Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Power Chords

Power Chords

Ratings: (0)|Views: 180|Likes:
Published by api-3736337

More info:

Published by: api-3736337 on Oct 18, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/18/2014

pdf

text

original

Title: Power Chords
Title: Power Chords
Title: Power Chords
Title: Power Chords
Level: Beginner
Style: Heavy Metal Rhythm

Hey kids, its Ky again! Today we will learn about power chords! Last time we
learned the Half-Step and Whole-Step intervals. To start this lesson off we will
learn a new interval: the Perfect Fifth. A perfect fifth is equal to seven half
steps, i.e. two notes seven frets apart. However, since we are talking about a
chord, that means we want to strike both notes simultaneously, and the only way to
do this is by using two strings. Here is a sample power chord:

E|----------------| B|----------------| G|----------------| D|--------5-------| A|--------3-------| E|----------------|

The root note, played on the A string, is the C. And the fifth of C, which is a G,
is played on the D string. The beauty of power chords, is that you can make a
root-fifth chord almost anywhere by simply moving the same shape around the
fretboard. However, note that the shape changes when you play the root on the G-
string, since the interval between the G-string and the B-string is different from
the interval between other strings. Now lets look at some variations on the power
chord:

E|---------------|---------------|---------------| B|---------------|---------------|---------------| G|-------5-------|-------5-------|---------------| D|-------5-------|-------5-------|---------------| A|-------3-------|-------3-------|-------3-------| E|---------------|-------3-------|-------3-------|

In the first example, we have added another root above the fifth. This is another very common shape. The added high note makes the chord a little brighter. In the second example, we still have the root above the fifth, and now we have added a fifth below the root.

The third example shows just the two lowest notes of the previous example. Here the
root is actually the higher of the two notes, and the fifth is the lower note.
This is another important shape to learn. Technically, this chord is called an
"inverted" power chord. "Inversion" simply refers to the fact that the root is
higher than the fifth ... you can think of this as turning the chord upside-down.

Now lets combine our understanding of power chords with the minor scale that we
learned in the last lesson. Lets write all the power chords for the E minor key.
I
II iii
IV
V
vi vii

I
E|-------------------------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------------------------|
G|-----------------------------------2----4--------|
D|--------------------2----4----5----0----2--------|
A|-----2----4----5----0----2----3------------------|
E|-----0----2----3---------------------------------|

Notice several things:
Notice several things:
Notice several things:
Notice several things:

The root notes of the chords simply follow the pattern we learned last time, the
ascending E minor scale. I numbered the chords using roman numerals. This is the
convention for chords. In this and future lessons from me, it will be understood
that we are talking about root-fifth power chords when I use a roman numeral. Note
that this is not always the case in other kinds of music.

Finally, if you are wondering why I used lowercase letters for the 3rd, 6th and 7th chords, it is because we are using the minor scale, and these three minor intervals are flatted with respect to the major scale.

Notice how the first chord and the last chord are both I-chords. In fact, any
chord whose root note is an E would be an I-chord in the E minor key. Similarly,
there are many of each chord all over the fret board.

Class Assignment:
Class Assignment:
Class Assignment:
Class Assignment:
Try finding some more I-chords, II-chords, etc. in the E minor key. Also,
try finding all the chords for another minor key of your choice.
In the next lesson, we will learn about the tonic, which is an extremely
important concept.
Subject: INFO: Powerchords I for Beginners
Subject: INFO: Powerchords I for Beginners
Subject: INFO: Powerchords I for Beginners
Subject: INFO: Powerchords I for Beginners
Powerchords I (for Beginners)
Powerchords I (for Beginners)
Powerchords I (for Beginners)
Powerchords I (for Beginners)
----------------------------
----------------------------
----------------------------
----------------------------
Hello, I just want to show you how to play and locate the "simple" Powerchords
(A5,B5..... etc.)
Enjoy !

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
robert02000 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->