Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Importado (Issue IV)

Importado (Issue IV)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 483|Likes:
Published by Jonathan Leschinski
"De: Helen Morris
Enviado el: martes, 04 de noviembre de 2008 21:41
Asunto: Importado

Here is this semester's first publication of Importado.
Enjoy

Los editores quisieran agradecer a todos los participantes de este numero de Importado e enviar a cualquier miembro de la comunidad inspirado por el tema de la siguiente edición, Ideologias Politicas, a que nos envíen sus artículos, análisis o poesía para publicar antes del Lunes 17 de Noviembre. Quisiéramos agradecer a nuestras traductoras de esta edición, Eva y Regina.

The editors would like to thank all of the contributors to this issue of Importado, and encourage any member of the community inspired by the theme of the next issue, Political Ideology,to send us their articles, analysis or poetry for publication, by Monday 17th November. We would also like to thank our translators for this issue, Eva and Regina."
"De: Helen Morris
Enviado el: martes, 04 de noviembre de 2008 21:41
Asunto: Importado

Here is this semester's first publication of Importado.
Enjoy

Los editores quisieran agradecer a todos los participantes de este numero de Importado e enviar a cualquier miembro de la comunidad inspirado por el tema de la siguiente edición, Ideologias Politicas, a que nos envíen sus artículos, análisis o poesía para publicar antes del Lunes 17 de Noviembre. Quisiéramos agradecer a nuestras traductoras de esta edición, Eva y Regina.

The editors would like to thank all of the contributors to this issue of Importado, and encourage any member of the community inspired by the theme of the next issue, Political Ideology,to send us their articles, analysis or poetry for publication, by Monday 17th November. We would also like to thank our translators for this issue, Eva and Regina."

More info:

Published by: Jonathan Leschinski on Nov 02, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/02/2011

pdf

text

original

 
EO IMPORTADO ISSUE IV3 NOVEMBER 2008
 
UNITED WORLD COLLEGE OF COSTA RICA PAGE 1
 
In keeping with the original concept of Importado being a space in which thecommunity can express their views, anal-ysis and opinions on topics relevant to ourlives, both at school and in the context of the outside world, the focus of the first is-sue of the new year is Language. We havetried to include articles and poetry thatcover a range of the numerous aspects of language-related issues that people face,either here or in the wider context of theirlives. We hope that you are moved,amused and provoked to thought by thecontributions presented here.
In this issue:Bilingualism or Diglossia?Ejemplo gallegoAfrikaans-
The AfricanDutch"Palabrotas
Du sprichst aber gutDeutsch
 You
re from Belgium?La Lengua ImperialA woman
s languageGetting to know youLenguaje corporal y facial:Las sonrisas no tiene idi-omasBanana GirlLanguageAnd the final Veni, Vidi
Note from the Editors
 
EOR IMPORTADO ISSUE IV3 NOVEMBER 2008
 
UNITED WORLD COLLEGE OF COSTA RICA PAGE 2
 
 
WE WANT YOUR VOICE!
Any responses that members of the community have for articles or issues raised in thisfirst edition should be sent toimportado@uwccr.combecause we plan to establish a
Letters to The Editor
section in the next publication.
Spain is, de acuerdo con la constitución, amultinational state, this meaning that there aredifferent nations (grupos culturales) coexistingwithin its fronteras. There are territories in whichthere are two lenguas oficiales, such as the caseof Galicia, los Países Catalanes o el País Vasco.Does it mean, however, that we are bilingualcommunities? Not really. For the understandingof this issue, we must go down to the root of thediscussion: definiciones.We are already all familiar with the pala-bra bilingualism. However, I would like to recallits technical definition:
bilingüismo es la habili-dad de una persona de comunicarse en dos len- guas, cualesquiera que éstas sean
(for instance, Iknow a guy from the Netherlands who speaksDutch and Swahili). El bilingüismo is a conceptthat concerns
 solely
the individual. Hence, it is alogic falacia to talk about a bilingual comunidado escuela, por ejemplo.On the other hand, el gran desconocidopara el gran público: diglosia. Diglossia is a situ-ation of linguistic conflict: two languages are be-ing spoken in the same area, and the coexistenceis not balanced. La lengua A es ajena e impuesta,y acapara las funciones de prestigio y de poder.Language B, on the other hand, is vernacular i.e.original from the territory, and is subordinatedand displaced by language A. Esta situacióntakes place during any kind of conquista o colo-nialism process, may it be political, cultural oreconomical.Galicia is taken by many linguists to beone of the most representative examples of a di-glossic cultural group y un grupo es diglósicotan solo porque la mayoría de los individuostambién lo son. Therefore, diglossia, unlike bi-lingualism,
is
both an individual and a socialconcept.Qué mejor manera de explicar la diferen-cia entre bilingualism and diglossia que con unejemplo. Lets take two typical individuals, bothhablantes of both Spanish and Galician. The firstindividual is mi compañero Fran: Fran and hisparents speak Galician to Frans grandparents,pero hablan castellano (aka Spanish) entre ellos.Fran habla gallego con sus amigos de la villagepero approaches girls in Spanish when he goesclubbing in the city; y merca una barra de pande leña at the grocery, aunque compra un ba-guette en el supermercado.The second individual is me: I speak ga-llego en cualquier situación: with my family, conel doctor, at school y en los actos oficiales. Thishas caused me to be subject to mockery and dis-crimination in many ocassions, y a menudo hancaído sobre mí los prejuicios típicos acerca de losgalaicoparlantes: I am either a country bumpkinor an ultranationalist neither of them being true.Volviendo a la definición de diglossia, itis worthy to mention that a situation of linguisticconflict cannot be held forever, and there are twopossible outcomes: la asimilación lingüística yfinal sustitución, with the disappearance of thevernacular language, o la normalizaciónlingüística, with the reintegration of all its lin-guistic functions.Therefore, we must ask ourselves about the sus-tainability of having a bilingual or better said,diglossic community, and my hope is that theunderstanding of the definitions and implicationsof bilingualism and diglossia can bring about areconsideration of the bilingualism debate, whichhas been so far worked out with conceptoserróneos and if erroneous are the premises, er-roneous must therefore be the conclusions.
Xiana García Freire 
 
BILINGUALISMOR DIGLOSSIA?
El ejemplo gallego
 
EOR IMPORTADO ISSUE IV31 OCTOBER 2008
 
UNITED WORLD COLLEGE OF COSTA RICA PAGE 3
 
AFRIKAANS-
THE AFRI-CAN DUTCH
 P
icture thisa black, coloured(mixed-race) and white SouthAfrican, sitting around a table,conversing about the latest hap-penings in South African poli-tics. They have varying levelsof education and wealth and hailfrom different parts of SouthAfrica. Yet, the three have onecommon factor- Afrikaans istheir native language, their pre-ferred medium of communica-tion.To discuss the state of Afri-kaans in post-Apartheid SouthAfrica, the languages originsand development must be con-sidered. The first European set-tlers arrived at the Cape in 1652under Jan van Riebeek. Thearea was inhabited by indigen-ous people, known as theKhoikhoi. Later, French Hu-guenots, Germans and slavesfrom Indonesia and Malaysia joined the Dutch settlers. Thus,German, Portuguese, Malay andFrench minimally influencedAfrikaans. Historians disagreeabout the languages origins anddevelopment. Some argue thatthis unique coalesce contributedto the formation of a KitchenDutch. Others argue that theslaves, who wanted a mediumof communication not unders-tood by their masters, formedthe language. The slaves usedAfrikaans as their mother ton-gue, whilst Dutch was spokenby the Dutch descendants. TheDutch descendants only con-verted to Afrikaans as theirmother tongue and a medium of instruction after they decided tostay in South Africa and createtheir own culture. They felt thatthey needed their own distinc-tive language to help forge acommon bond between peopleof European descent that did notwant to take on the English cul-ture. Thus, they adopted Afri-kaans as part of their uniqueAfrikaner culture.The only African language totake its name from the conti-nent, Afrikaans means Afri-can in Dutch. Classified as anIndo-European language, be-longing to the West-Germanicfamily, Afrikaans and Dutch aremutually intelligible. Afrikaansshares about 80-90% of thesame vocabulary as StandaardNederlands (Standard Dutch).Afrikaans is one of South Afri-cas 11 official languages. It isthe home language of about 13,3% of the population. In com-parison, English is only spokenby 5, 8% of the population as ahome language, but is the lan-guage favored by commerce,politics and the media. Afri-kaans is the native language of 79.5% of South Africas ap-proximately 3, 9 million Colou-reds, followed by 59.1% of Whites (4.29m), 1.7% of In-dians/Asians (1.16m) and 0.7%(35.42m) of Blacks. Due to theformer regimes preference of Afrikaans, it is a language al-most every South African un-derstands. Afrikaans-speakingcommunities are found abroad,such as in Canada, Belgium, theUSA, UK and Australia, due toimmigration.Afrikaans remained a spokenlanguage until the beginning of the 20
th
century. In 1875, DieGennootskap van Regte Afri-kaners (The Fraternity of TrueAfrikaners) was formed. Thisgave birth to the association of an Afrikaner being a white. AnAfrikaner is defined as A whiteSouth African who speaks Afri-kaans as their first language,esp. one descended from Dutchsettlers. Ironically, the majorityof Afrikaans speakers are non-white (coloured). South Africabecame a Union in 1910 andDutch and English were theofficial languages. In 1925,Afrikaans gained official recog-nition and was no longer consi-dered a dialect of Dutch. 1948saw the introduction of Apar-theid under the National Party.Afrikaans was the governmentsfavored language, but it heldequal status with English as anofficial language.The link between Apartheid andAfrikaans still exists. Manyblack South Africans still seeAfrikaans as the language of the oppressor and as the lan-

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->