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GMAT - Vocabulary List[1]

GMAT - Vocabulary List[1]

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05/09/2014

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GMAT Vocabulary List
Movie HONG
abaft
(adv.) on or toward the rear of a ship
The passengers moved abaft of the ship so as to escape the fire in the
front of the ship.
abandon
(v.; n) to leave behind; to give something up; freedom; enthusiasm;
impetuosity
After failing for several years, he abandoned his dream of starting a
grocery business.
Lucy embarked on her new adventure with abandon.
abase
(v.) to degrade; humiliate; disgrace
The mother's public reprimand abased the girl.
The insecure father, after failing to achieve his own life- long goals,
abased his children whenever they failed.
abbreviate
(v.) to shorten; compress; diminish
His vacation to Japan was abbreviated when he acquired an illness
treatable only in the United States.
abdicate
(v.) to reject, renounce, or abandon
Due to his poor payment record, it may be necessary to abdicate our
relationship with the client.
aberrant
(adj.) abnormal; straying from the normal or usual path
The aberrant flight pattern of the airplane alarmed the air traffic
controllers.
His aberrant behavior led his friends to worry the divorce had taken its
toll.
abeyance
(n.) a state of temporary suspension or inactivity
Since the power failure, the town has been in abeyance.
abhor
(v.) to hate
By the way her jaw tensed when he walked in, it is easy to see that she
abhors him.
The dog abhorred cats, chasing and growling at them whenever he had
the opportunity.
abject
(adj.) of the worst or lowest degree
The Haldemans lived in abject poverty, with barely a roof over their
heads.
abjure
(v.) to give up
The losing team may abjure to the team that is winning.
abnegation
(n.) a denial
The woman's abnegation of her loss was apparent when she began to
laugh.
abominate
(v.) to loathe; to hate
Randall abominated all the traffic he encountered on every morning
commute.
Please do not abominate the guilty person until you hear the complete
explanation.
abridge
(v.) to shorten; to limit
The editor abridged the story to make the book easier to digest.
abrogate
(v.) to cancel by authority
The judge would not abrogate the law.
abrupt
(adj.) happening or ending unexpectedly
The abrupt end to their marriage was a shock to everyone.
abscond
(v.) to go away hastily or secretly; to hide
The newly wed couple will abscond from the reception to leave on the
honeymoon.
absolve
(v.) to forgive; to acquit

The judge will absolve the person of all charges.
After feuding for many years, the brothers absolved each other for the
many arguments they had.

abstemious
(adj.) sparing in use of food or drinks
If we become stranded in the snow storm, we will have to be abstemious
with our food supply.
In many abstemious cultures the people are so thin due to the belief that
too much taken into the body leads to contamination of the soul.
abstinence
(n.) the act or process of voluntarily refraining from any action or
practice; self- control; chastity
In preparation for the Olympic games, the athletes practiced abstinence
from red meat and junk food, adhering instead to a menu of pasta and
produce.
abstruse
(adj.) hard to understand; deep; recondite
The topic was so abstruse the student was forced to stop reading.
The concept was too abstruse for the average student to grasp.
abysmal
(adj.) very deep
The abysmal waters contained little plant life.
accede
(v.) to comply with; to consent to
With defeat imminent, the rebel army acceded to hash out a peace treaty.
acclaim
(n.) loud approval; applause
Edward Albee's brilliantly written Broadway revival of A Delicate
Balance received wide acclaim.
accolade
(n.) approving or praising mention; a sign of approval or respect
Rich accolades were bestowed on the returning hero.
Accolades flowed into her dressing room following the opening- night
triumph.
accomplice
(n.) co- conspirator; partner; partner- in- crime
The bank robber's accomplice drove the get- away car.
accretion
(n.)growth by addition; a growing together by parts
With the accretion of the new members, the club doubled its original size.
The addition of the new departments accounts for the accretion of the
company.
accrue
(v.) a natural growth; a periodic increase
Over the course of her college career, she managed to accrue a great
deal of knowledge.

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