Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
9Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Bitters Recipe Sampler by Brad Thomas Parsons

Bitters Recipe Sampler by Brad Thomas Parsons

Ratings: (0)|Views: 832 |Likes:
Published by The Recipe Club
Included in this excerpt: Apple Bitters, Manhattan, Angostura Fizz, Autumn Sweater, The Long Hello, Scuppernong Sour, and Broiled Bitter Grapefruit. Gone are the days when a lonely bottle of Angostura bitters held court behind the bar. A cocktail renaissance has swept across the country, inspiring in bartenders and their thirsty patrons a new fascination with the ingredients, techniques, and traditions that make the American cocktail so special. And few ingredients have as rich a history or serve as fundamental a role in our beverage heritage as bitters.

Author and bitters enthusiast Brad Thomas Parsons traces the history of the world’s most storied elixir, from its earliest “snake oil” days to its near evaporation after Prohibition to its ascension as a beloved (and at times obsessed-over) ingredient on the contemporary bar scene. Parsons writes from the front lines of the bitters boom, where he has access to the best and boldest new brands and flavors, the most innovative artisanal producers, and insider knowledge of the bitters-making process.

Whether you’re a professional looking to take your game to the next level or just a DIY-type interested in homemade potables, Bitters has a dozen recipes for customized blends--ranging from Apple to Coffee-Pecan to Root Beer bitters--as well as tips on sourcing ingredients and step-by-step instructions fit for amateur and seasoned food crafters alike.

Also featured are more than seventy cocktail recipes that showcase bitters’ diversity and versatility: classics like the Manhattan (if you ever get one without bitters, send it back), old-guard favorites like the Martinez, contemporary drinks from Parsons’s own repertoire like the Shady Lane, plus one-of-a-kind libations from the country’s most pioneering bartenders. Last but not least, there is a full chapter on cooking with bitters, with a dozen recipes for sweet and savory bitters-infused dishes.

Part recipe book, part project guide, part barman’s manifesto, Bitters is a celebration of good cocktails made well, and of the once-forgotten but blessedly rediscovered virtues of bitters. For more information, visit crownpublishing.com.
Included in this excerpt: Apple Bitters, Manhattan, Angostura Fizz, Autumn Sweater, The Long Hello, Scuppernong Sour, and Broiled Bitter Grapefruit. Gone are the days when a lonely bottle of Angostura bitters held court behind the bar. A cocktail renaissance has swept across the country, inspiring in bartenders and their thirsty patrons a new fascination with the ingredients, techniques, and traditions that make the American cocktail so special. And few ingredients have as rich a history or serve as fundamental a role in our beverage heritage as bitters.

Author and bitters enthusiast Brad Thomas Parsons traces the history of the world’s most storied elixir, from its earliest “snake oil” days to its near evaporation after Prohibition to its ascension as a beloved (and at times obsessed-over) ingredient on the contemporary bar scene. Parsons writes from the front lines of the bitters boom, where he has access to the best and boldest new brands and flavors, the most innovative artisanal producers, and insider knowledge of the bitters-making process.

Whether you’re a professional looking to take your game to the next level or just a DIY-type interested in homemade potables, Bitters has a dozen recipes for customized blends--ranging from Apple to Coffee-Pecan to Root Beer bitters--as well as tips on sourcing ingredients and step-by-step instructions fit for amateur and seasoned food crafters alike.

Also featured are more than seventy cocktail recipes that showcase bitters’ diversity and versatility: classics like the Manhattan (if you ever get one without bitters, send it back), old-guard favorites like the Martinez, contemporary drinks from Parsons’s own repertoire like the Shady Lane, plus one-of-a-kind libations from the country’s most pioneering bartenders. Last but not least, there is a full chapter on cooking with bitters, with a dozen recipes for sweet and savory bitters-infused dishes.

Part recipe book, part project guide, part barman’s manifesto, Bitters is a celebration of good cocktails made well, and of the once-forgotten but blessedly rediscovered virtues of bitters. For more information, visit crownpublishing.com.

More info:

Published by: The Recipe Club on Nov 03, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/29/2013

pdf

text

original

 
itt

make your own bitters
 y 
 Apple Bitters2
bitters hall of fame
 y 
Manhattan4
old-guard cocktails
 y 
 Angostura Fizz6
new-look cocktails
 y 
 Autumn Sweater9The Long Hello10Scuppernong Sour12
bitters in the kitchen
 y 
Broiled Bitter Grapefruit15
BItTERs
REcIPE SAMPLER
 
itt
 
TEN SPEED PRESS
 
www.tenspeed.com
Mk Yu w itt
3
TEN SPEED PRESS
 
www.tenspeed.com
Cover the solids in the saucepan with the water and bring toa boil over medium-high heat. Cover the saucepan, lower theheat, and simmer for  minutes.Remove the saucepan from the heat and let cool completely.Once cooled, add the contents of the saucepan (both liquidand solids) to another quart-sized Mason jar. Cover the jar andstore at room temperature out of direct sunlight for  week,shaking the jar daily. Aer  week, strain the jar with the liquid and solids througha cheesecloth-lined funnel into a clean quart-sized Mason jar.Repeat until all of the sediment has been ltered out. Discardthe solids. Add this liquid to the jar containing the originalbourbon solution. Add the rich syrup to the jar and stir to incorporate, thencover and shake to fully dissolve the syrup. Allow the mixture to stand at room temperature for 3 days. At the end of the 3 days, skim o any debris that oats to thesurface and pour the mixture through a cheesecloth-linedfunnel one last time to remove any solids.Using a funnel, decant the bitters into smaller jars and label.If there’s any sediment le in the bottles, or if the liquid iscloudy, give the bottle a shake before using. e bitters willlast indenitely, but for optimum avor use within a year.
Makes about 20 ounces
 y 
Peels from 6 medium to largeapples, preferably organicZest of 
 1
 / 
 2
lemon, cut intostrips with a paring knife 2 cinnamon sticks
 1
 / 
 2
teaspoon allspice berries
 1
 / 
teaspoon coriander seeds
 1
 / 
 2
teaspoon cassia chips
 1
 / 
 2
teaspoon cinchona bark cloves 2 cups high-proof bourbon, or more as needed 1 cup water  2 tablespoons rich syrup(page 2)
ere’s no better sign that fall has arrived than a basket of crisp apples on the kitchen counter. Whether you pluck themstraight o the tree at an orchard or pick them up from avendor at the farmers’ market, it’s hard to resist eating themout of hand, but try to save a few for this recipe. e cinnamonand brown sugar echo the avor of traditional apple pie, but inthis recipe you use only the skin of the apples, a tip I picked upfrom Bobby Heugel at Houston’s Anvil Bar (the peel introducesbitterness and apple avor without the added sugar andwater that would make the solution too sweet). is bittersadds a sweet spiciness to bourbon, rye, whiskey, applejack,or apple brandy, and is also just dandy in an old-fashioned orManhattan.
 y 
Place all of the ingredients except for the bourbon, water,and rich syrup in a quart-sized Mason jar or other large glasscontainer with a lid. Pour in the  cups of bourbon, addingmore if necessary so that all the ingredients are covered. Sealthe jar and store at room temperature out of direct sunlight for weeks, shaking the jar once a day. Aer  weeks, strain the liquid through a cheesecloth-linedfunnel into a clean quart-sized jar to remove the solids. Repeatuntil all of the sediment has been ltered out. Squeeze thecheesecloth over the jar to release any excess liquid and transferthe solids to a small saucepan. Cover the jar and set aside.
 Apple Bitters
 
4
itt
 
TEN SPEED PRESS
 
www.tenspeed.com
Makes 1 drink
 y 
 2 ounces rye or bourbon 1 ounce sweet vermouth 1 dash Angostura or other aromatic bitters 1 dash orange bittersGarnish: amarena or marascacherry or lemon twist 
Better cocktail historians than I have presented and debunkedendless accounts of how the Manhattan came to be, so I won’twaste ink here rehashing those colorful stories (see GaryRegan, William Grimes, and David Wondrich for that). Whilebourbon has become the de facto spirit in most Manhattans,the classic spirit for this drink is rye (though I would neverturn down a bourbon Manhattan). Always stir this drink,never shake it. And a Manhattan isn’t a Manhattan withoutthe bitters. Angostura is the way to go for a classic, but Ipersonally like to split the dierence and use one dash of aromatic bitters and one dash of orange. Going all orangetends to ramp up the sweetness without bringing the spice.
 y 
Combine the rye or bourbon, vermouth, and bitters in amixing glass lled with ice. Stir until chilled and strain intoa chilled coupe or cocktail glass. Garnish with the cherry orlemon twist.
Manhattan

Activity (9)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
agobarman liked this
Dadati Sou liked this
Jose A. Alicea liked this
Diana Di liked this
Odyl Jones liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download