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High Availability Basics

High Availability Basics

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Published by: api-3827062 on Oct 18, 2008
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03/18/2014

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Can your organisation deal
with a sudden and immediate
loss of its IT systems?

And can you avoid it?
A guide to removing user downtime as part of a core
business Initiative

Includes a practical check-list for assessing the
effectiveness of your proposed High Availability,
Business Continuity or Disaster Recovery solution

By Neil Robertson
\u00a9 Copyright of the Neverfail Group 2005
Connected!A management guide to removing user downtime as part of a core business initiative.
\u00a9 Copyright of the Neverfail Group 2005
To contents page

It is no secret that technology moves forward at seemingly ever
increasing pace. As a result, it becomes progressively more dif\ufb01cult
for senior management to keep-up-to date with what is technically
possible and therefore what has become commercially desirable.

It is a fact that almost every organisation is continually increasing its
dependency on IT to do business. Critical applications are woven
into the very fabric of day-to-day business operations, yet senior
management of the vast majority of organisations still fail to even
review their vulnerability, exposure and liability to IT downtime.

The options available to organisations for IT Disaster Recovery (DR),
High Availability (HA) and Business Continuity (BC) planning have
fundamentally changed in what is achievable, whilst the complexity
and cost of deployment / on-going management have reduced
signi\ufb01cantly.
The IT industry has been built on the delivery of solutions that are
fast, easier to use and cheaper than their predecessors. This process
delivers better value to all businesses, whilst making the solution
available to an ever increasing market. For the larger organisations
this means better protection at lower cost. For the smaller
organisation, it means that vastly superior protection is not only
available to them for the \ufb01rst time, but is \ufb01nancially justi\ufb01able and,
perhaps more importantly, commercially desirable.

This book will help corporate executives and senior IT staff to re-
evaluate their core strategy in the use, protection and availability of
the critical IT systems that underpin the moment-by-moment running
of their business.

It will also help IT staff to cut through the marketing spin and address
the critical issues during the purchasing process of systems and
software that claim to eliminate user-downtime.

The emphasis has moved from protecting data to protecting the
productivity of the user; whether that user is a member of your staff,
or one of your customers, suppliers or prospects, whether they are
internal, on-line or accessing applications and information on your
intranet, extranet or website.

Every business recognises its increasing reliance on IT for the day-to-
day operation of its business.

Now, management has a clear choice on whether they are prepared to recognise and quantify their corporate exposure to downtime, and based on those \ufb01ndings, tolerate downtime or not.

The signi\ufb01cance of that decision is relevant to your shareholders,
stakeholders, employees, partners, customers and prospects, who
look to you to protect and advance their respective interests.

Neil Robertson
April 2005
FOREWORD
3
4
Connected!A management guide to removing user downtime as part of a core business initiative.
\u00a9 Copyright of the Neverfail Group 2005
To contents page

Foreword
Contents
A Glossary of Terms
Why do we tolerate Downtime?
Quanti\ufb01cation of Downtime Risk
High Availability or Disaster Recovery?
Does Downtime really Matter?
Who is Responsible and therefore who is to Blame?
Next Steps
Critical Server Identi\ufb01cation:
Data Protection
High Availability and Disaster Recovery: Selection criteria
Architecture: Basic Structure of the HA / DR solution
Reliability & Monitoring
Application Software Protection / Auxiliary Software Protection
Switch / Failover Criteria and Performance
Bandwidth Considerations
Summary
The Critical Components required to removing Downtime
About the Author

CONTENTS
Page

3-4
5-6
7-8
9-10
11-12
13-15
16-20
21-22
23-24
25-26
27-28
29-30
31-34
35-38
39-41
42-44
45-47
48
49-50
51-52

www.neverfailgroup.com
CONTENTS
5
6
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