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Acidification EST Maug

Acidification EST Maug

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Published by: kristina_marlow_1 on Nov 06, 2011
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11/06/2011

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The Pacific Ocean’s AcidificationLaboratory
C H R I S T O P H E R P A L
The thermal vents of Maug Island offer a rare chance tostudy ocean acidification in situ, which gives us a glimpse ofwhat the future might hold.
Five years ago, at the quadrennial International Coral Reef Symposium in Okinawa, Japan, a poll of the scientists andresource managers present ranked ocean acidification 38thout of a list of 39 possible threats facing reefs, recalls Rusty Brainard, head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division.Last year, at the same conference in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.,“Acidification was mentioned almost everywhere.” Asithappens,theperfectinvivolaboratorytostudyoceanacidification lies across the Pacific from Brainard’s office inHonolulu, Hawaii: it’s the U.S. Commonwealth of theNorthernMarianasIslands,locatednorthofGuamandsouthof Japan. The Marianas offer a unique set of pristineecosystemslivingsidebysidewithhydrothermalventsbothdeepandshallow,spewinggaseousandevenliquidCO
2
andSO
2
. Near one vent, the pH of the water is 1.“I’ve been going to sea for 20 years, and these places areby far the most amazing; they’re just mind-boggling,” saysBill Chadwick, research professor of volcanology at OregonState University. Removed as they are from the rest of the world, these waters house an ecosystem that thrives aroundthefirstliquidsulfurfoundonearthandacolonyofmussels with paper-thin shells, exquisitely adapted to highly acidic water.“You can see coral bleaching events all over the world,but you can only look at the effects of acidification at a very few places,” says Brainard. “Maug Island is one of the best.”Uninhabited Maug, one of the northernmost Marianas,is a partly submerged crater with an unusually deep lagoonteeming with fish and coral. Hydrothermal vents spewing hot,acidicwatercreatedeadzonesthatspanjustafewmetersandofferawindowintohowcoralsreacttoacidinanaturalsetting.Alittledeeper,chemosyntheticcommunitiesoverlap withphotosyntheticones
s
oneofthefewplacesintheworld where the two can be observed together.
Two causes of acidification
 As the oceans absorb CO
2
from the atmosphere at the rateof one million tons per hour, the pH of the water ischanging. Since the Industrial Revolution, the amount of CO
2
in the atmosphere has risen from 280 to 380 parts permillion, and the pH of the ocean water at depths of 1000meters or less has dropped from roughly 8.2 to 8.1, saysBrainard. In the ocean, the rate of change is accelerating:in the past two decades alone, the pH fell from 8.13 to 8.08atStationALOHA,whichisanabstractpointlocatednorthof Honolulu. These are the only measurements that exist worldwide for that period. Brainard predicts where suchtrends might lead if they continue unchecked. “Forinstance, if we double the 280 figure to 560, we’d expectthe tropics to have the same coral cover as the Galapagos, which is very low,” he says.Ocean acidity varies naturally. For example, on many seamounts, cold-water corals grow in undersaturated water
s
 water in which a seashell will naturally dissolve,explains Peter Brewer, an ocean chemist at the Monterey BayAquariumResearchInstitute.“Ontheseseamounts,youdon’t see dead corals, because they dissolve as soon as they die, and the living ones you see are very old.” With acidification, the proportion of the ocean that’sundersaturated will grow, and undoubtedly some species will adapt, says Brewer. “But we don’t know which [ones]because the changes have never happened so fast before.”TheonlyotherknownsiteofshallowCO
2
ventingisinSicily,Italy, where the waters are not pristine and where no caseof such adaptation has been found so far.But that isn’t all. A second kind of acidification is going onthat’slesswell-known,saysBrewer:milderwintersmeanoxygen-rich surface waters have not cooled enough to sink as deep as they did in the past, so in effect, the ventilationof the deep oceans is diminishing. As a result, the denizensof the deep receive less oxygen, but they are still producing CO
2
as they breathe. “It’s a double whammy,” says Brewer.CO
2
levels rise from fossil fuel emissions in the air whilereduced ventilation cuts the supply of oxygen and builds uprespired CO
2
.
A living lab
Labworkhelpsresearcherstounderstandoceanacidification,but “it’s better to observe natural processes that do themanipulation for you,” says NOAA oceanographer RichardFeely of the Pacific Marine Environmental Laborator(PMEL).
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Environ. Sci. Technol.
XXXX,
xxx,
000–000
10.1021/es902148f
XXXX American Chemical Society VOL. xxx, NO. xx, XXXX / ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
9
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