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Fall 2011 Compass Rose Society Communicator

Fall 2011 Compass Rose Society Communicator

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Published by Norris Battin
Fall 2011 issue of the newsletter of the Compass Rose Society
Fall 2011 issue of the newsletter of the Compass Rose Society

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Published by: Norris Battin on Nov 08, 2011
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01/15/2013

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Liverpool Cathedral Offers Compass RoseMembers Radical Hospitality
By Norris Battin
W
hile my travels to England over the years have taken me to manycathedrals through the country, this was just my third visit to an Englishcathedral with the Compass Rose Society – we’d been to CanterburyCathedral or a board meeting several years ago and to SalisburyCathedral on a previous study visit. At each o these magnifcent placeswe learned a great deal about the cathedrals, about Anglicanism, aboutThe Church o England and its liturgy and about English history. Ourvisit to Liverpool Cathedral and the Diocese o Liverpool continuedto expand this knowledge.Liverpool Cathedral, or example, is the largest Anglican Cathedral,the largest cathedral in England and the fth largest cathedral in theworld. It is a modern edifce. Designed in the Gothic style by the architectSir Giles Gilbert Scott with its oundation stone laid in 1904 by KingEdward VII, its third and fnal phase was completed in 1978.
Fall 2011
1
MESSAGE FROM OURPRESIDENT
DEAR FRIENDS,
As I write this, the changeo seasons in Eastern Canadais slowly underway as wecelebrate our CanadianThanksgiving (second Mondayin October) with summer-liketemperatures and brilliantall colours.This year’s Annual General Meeting (September21st & 22nd) o the Compass Rose Society in London,England flled me with deep thanks or my brothersand sisters within our beloved Anglican Commu-nion. I also give thanks or the ministry o the sta at Andrew’s House – the ofces o the AnglicanCommunion.I think is it is air to say that more can always belearned about our Anglican Communion whichthe Compass Rose Society supports. This year, ourmeetings oered a deeper look into the lie o ourworldwide church.
Here are a few thumbnail sketchesof what we learned:
Around the globe, gender-based violenceplagues our world and our church. In keepingwith the Five Marks o Mission, we listened tothe Reverend Terrie Robinson clearly articulatingthese issues and sharing the work that is beingdone around the world to eradicate this blight.
•
 Ms. Sally Keeble spoke about the Anglican Alli-ance initiative – an eort frst proposed at theLambeth Conerence. The Anglican Alliancecommunicates and raises major issues in the areas
Continued on page 7 Continued on page 2
The nave bridge near the west entrance of Liverpool Cathedral 
 
2
What’s really striking about it is that rom the dramatic bridgenear the west entrance to the reredos there is only open space.There’s not a column to be seen down an enormous open navewith its two transepts and “Central Space”, a ceiling 175 eetabove it (at its apex) and a 331 oot central tower topping ito: ride two lits up to the bell chamber – 14 bells reside there;the heaviest and highest peal bells in the world – then walk 108steps to the top o the tower and a magnicent view.But as it turned out, this spectacular cathedral was but onepart o a broadly educational and spiritual visit to the Dioceseo Liverpool.Lynne Butt, the travel manager or the Anglican CommunionOce in London who along with Clare Kerrigan on the Cathedralsta looked ater our arrangements fawlessly, described thescope o our visit well:“Liverpool wasan excellent visit.I assumed that as astudy visit we wouldbe hearing a lot romboth sides about therelationship betweenAnglicans and theRoman Catholic Churchin the diocese. Relation-ships are obviously verycordial, as our welcomedinner with Dean JustinWelby was held in theRoman Catholic cathe-dral [the MetropolitanCathedral o Christ theKing]! We also attendedmass there.“But it turned out tobe more o a missionvisit, as our visits wereto various community projects in the diocese – schools, children’scentre with parenting classes, a hal-way house or womenprisoners, and a community centre oering art classes and wemet some truly inspiring people (mostly women!) who were doingso much with virtually no unding at all.“Liverpool has some o the most deprived boroughs in the wholeo Europe, a mix o unemployment, drugs, lack o educationalattainment, alcohol and underage pregnancies – the works.“The basic theme o our visit was regeneration, and the citycentre and waterront are very impressive, but it’s hard to seehow it will continue to the very poor areas with all the governmentcuts they are experiencing.”We came to Liverpool Cathedral at a transition point in itslie. Dean Welby has been appointed Bishop o Durham andwas in the midst o taking his leave as he assumes his new postat the end o November. Nevertheless, he was most graciousand generous with his time as he introduced us to the history o Liverpool and the Cathedral, accompanied us to several stops onour program, led an Evensong or our group and, with his wieCaroline, hosted us at a nal dinner in the cathedral’s on-sitereectory, Couture.A presentation by Mike Eastwood, Diocesan Secretary, Dioceseo Liverpool and Director o Operations o the Cathedral, taughtus about the mission o the Diocese o Liverpool and how theactivities o its Cathedral in are integrated into that mission.The Diocese see its mission as: “To see a sustainable, led andtransorming Christian presence in every community to enableall people to act justly, love mercy and walk humbly with God.”The Dean characterizes the Cathedral as a “sae place to do riskythings in Christ’s service.”Mary Donovan reported, “I was impressed by the way inwhich the Diocese had analyzed the basic social and economicproblems conrontingthe clergy, developedthe “Bishop’s GrowthAgenda” and thentranslated that agendainto specic goals oreach congregation. Ob-viously a great deal o thought has gone intohelping clergy dealwith the problems theyconront.“Ater this brieng,we were well preparedto visit local parishesand the institutions inthe Diocese. (Recall thata parish in the Churcho England reers to ageographic area andthat the clergy in theparish support theschools and socialagencies within it as well as the congregations in the parishes.The Diocese o Liverpool and the Cathedral are stronglyocused on ministry in the local community.)A subsequent tour o the city with Ken Pye, a mostknowledgeable local historian, helped us understand the city’spast, its current ongoing renaissance and the challenges thatthe Diocese aces. Mary Donovan provided an insightulsummary o our visit to city and its suburbs:“This trip had such a powerul eect on me because it orcedme to conront the diiculty o adjusting to lie in a post-industrial age. All around us were the remnants o the industryand commerce that had made Liverpool a great city: the extensivedock system, the huge tobacco and sugar warehouses standingempty and literally unusable today, the elaborate collection o locks within the harbor, even the Cathedral itsel, a monumentto a system o pomp and ceremony that is largely gone out o people’s lives today.“The work o importing and distributing goods continues –
Cathedral views
 
3
but it is accomplished largely by mechanized systems. The hugenumber o teamsters who had ormerly moved those goods aresimply not needed today. All the people we talked to told usunemployment is the biggest problem they deal with. Unem-ployment and all its eects – apathy, lethargy, alcoholism, amilybrutality, and poor health – were so pervasive, both in Liverpoolitsel and in the outlying village o Wigan. And no one couldreally see ways to put people back to work.“I came away with a tremendous admiration or the peoplewe met in the various schools and social agencies who were soercely dedicated to instilling hope in clients who had so ewreasons or hope. I was impressed with the imagination andenergy with which programs were designed.“The St. Francis o Assisi School (editor’s note: a joint activityo the Anglican and Roman Catholic Churches in Liverpool), orexample, painted their hallway walls with scenes rom St. Francis’Canticle to the Sun to emphasize the school’s ocus on ecology.“The art center in Wigan (a Liverpool suburb that wevisited) actually hired a local grati artist to embellish its outerwalls to make the place more inviting to the “toughs” o theneighborhood.“Since the people o St. James in the City hadn’t yet oundthe unding to restore the roo o the deserted church buildingthey were reviving, they simply erected a tent inside and heldservices there.“I was also impressed by the obvious spirit o cooperationbetween the Anglican and the Roman Catholic authorities – their joint support o various community centers and schools wevisited and the evident working relationship between the twocathedrals. I was intrigued by the amount o church-statecooperation in the educational system – church schools undedby the state – in a way that would never be allowed in the UnitedStates and religious classes in the secular schools.“But at the end o the trip, the overwhelming question in mymind was why can’t we gure out a massive way to put peopleback to work? We can send a rocket to the moon, why can’t weregenerate our inner cities?”Our visit ended with a spectacular twenty minute
son
 
et lumière 
show inside the Cathedral ollowing our arewell dinnerwith clergy representing other aiths in the Liverpool religiouscommunity and the Cathedral sta and diocesan clergy who hadbeen so generous with their time during our stay.As the Cathedral organist played an ever growing crescendoo classic pieces on the massive 9,765 pipe Willis organ, the lightsfashed brightly around us in the deepest recesses o the buildinggradually bringing us rom total darkness to brightest light.This amiliar Christian metaphor sent us home thinking aboutthe renaissance we had seen taking place in the city o Liverpooland with its people, praying mightily that it would continue andmost thankul to all those who made our visit so memorable.(More pictures at
http://bit.ly/CRSLiverpool 
).
NEW BOARD &OFFICERS ELECTED
At the 2011Annual General Meeting the member-ship elected
The Right Reverend C. Andrew Doyle
,Houston and
Carlos R. Munoz
, White Plains, N.Y.to its board o directors.The Society’s President Phillip Poole thanked theretiring board members or their service and welcomedthose who agreed to join the board going orward asthe Compass Rose Society supports the work o theAnglican Communion and expands its membershipthroughout the Anglican world.
The New Directors Join These Board
Members (and Ofcers
*
) Currently Serving:
Mr. B. Norris Battin, Newport Beach, CA.;Mr. Robert Biehl
*
, Houston, TX;The Reverend Sarah Buxton-Smith, Bualo, NY;The Very Reverend Samuel G. Candler
*
, Atlanta, GA;The Reverend Canon Jan Naylor Cope
*
, Washington, DC;The Right Reverend George Councell, Trenton, NJ;Mr. Joey Fan
*
, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong;The Most Reverend Terence Finlay
*
, Toronto, ON;Mr. Robert Foltz, Bonita Springs, FL;Ms. Constance Fraser Gray, Winston Salem, NC;The Reverend Canon Kenneth Kearon, London, UK;The Reverend Rick Lord, Vienna, VA;The Right Reverend Victoria Matthews,Christchurch, New Zealand;Mr. Marshall McReal, Seattle, WA;The Reverend Canon John Peterson, Hendersonville, NC;The Right Reverend Philip Poole
*
, Aurora, ON;Ms. Janie Stevens, Houston, TX;Ms. Della Wager Wells, Atlanta, GA;Ms. Antonia Wong Tuen-Yee, Central, Hong Kong;Ms. Beverley Paterson Wood, Aurora, ON

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