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Wireless Access Networks - Fixed Wireless Access and WLL Networks

Wireless Access Networks - Fixed Wireless Access and WLL Networks

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Published by: api-3700036 on Oct 18, 2008
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03/18/2014

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Part I
Fundamentals of Fixed Wireless
Wireless Access Networks: Fixed Wireless Access and WLL
Networks \u00d0 Design and Operation. Martin P. Clark
Copyright
&
2000 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Print ISBN 0-471-49298-1 Online ISBN 0-470-84151-6
1The Case for Fixed Wireless
Networks

Radio is playing an important role in the restructuring of the public telecommunications industry \u00d0 at a time of deregulation, structural change and rapid growth in demand. It is an effective means of communication between remote or mobile locations and over dif\u00aecult terrain, where cable laying and maintenance is not possible or is prohibitively expensive. It is also an ef\u00aecient means of broadcasting the same information to multiple receivers. The \u00aerst part of the renaissance of radio in public telecommunications networks was its use in mobile telephone networks, but the next phase is already upon us, the use of radio as an `access means' in `\u00aexed wireless networks'. In this chapter, we discuss when and why \u00aexed wireless networks are attractive. We introduce the basic applications of \u00aexed wireless networks, and consider the alternative technologies. We also discuss the economic, coverage and service advantages.

1.1 Radio

By using a very strong electrical signal as a transmitting source, an electromagnetic wave can be made to spread far and wide through thin air. That is the principle of radio, discovered by Heinrich Hertz in 1887. The radio waves are produced by transmitters, which consist of a radio wave source connected to some form of antenna. Examples of radio systems which are used in public telecommunications or broadcast networks include:

.
low frequency radio and mast antenna used in public radiobroadcast applications (LW
(longwave), MW (medium wave), SW (shortwave));
.

HF (High Frequency), VHF (Very HF), or UHF (Ultra-HF) radio system and mast antenna used for modern public radiobroadcast, particularly for local radio stations and television broadcasting;

.
troposheric scatter radio systems used in early `over-the horizon' telecommunications
radio systems, e.g. from ship-to-shore;
.
microwave radio links, providing forpoint-to-point (PTP) connections between pairs of
endpoints, using highly directional dish-type antennas;
.
satellite radio systems, providing for bothpoint-to-point (PTP) as well aspoint-to-
multipoint(PMP) and broadcastapplications over long distances and very large
geographical areas;
3
Wireless Access Networks: Fixed Wireless Access and WLL
Networks \u00d0 Design and Operation. Martin P. Clark
Copyright
&
2000 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Print ISBN 0-471-49298-1 Online ISBN 0-470-84151-6

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