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Emer de Vattel - Law of Nations Vol 1 Ch 19 - One's Country and Matters Relating to It - Sec 212 - Natural Born Citizen defined

Emer de Vattel - Law of Nations Vol 1 Ch 19 - One's Country and Matters Relating to It - Sec 212 - Natural Born Citizen defined

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Emmerich de Vattel - Law of Nations or Principles of Natural Law - Vol 1 Ch 19 - One's Country and Matters Relating to It - Sec 212 - Natural Born Citizen defined.

For more information about Obama's constitutional ineligibility issues and criminal activities before and after he entered the Oval Office:
http://www.protectourliberty.org
http://cdrkerchner.wordpress.com
http://puzo1.blogspot.com
Emmerich de Vattel - Law of Nations or Principles of Natural Law - Vol 1 Ch 19 - One's Country and Matters Relating to It - Sec 212 - Natural Born Citizen defined.

For more information about Obama's constitutional ineligibility issues and criminal activities before and after he entered the Oval Office:
http://www.protectourliberty.org
http://cdrkerchner.wordpress.com
http://puzo1.blogspot.com

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Published by: protectourliberty on Nov 09, 2011
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04/14/2012

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The Online Library of Liberty
A Project Of Liberty Fund, Inc.
Emer de Vattel,
The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and Affairsof Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays onthe Origin and Nature of Natural Law and on Luxury(LF ed.)
[1797]
The Online Library Of Liberty
This E-Book (PDF format) is published by Liberty Fund, Inc., a private,non-profit, educational foundation established in 1960 to encourage study of the idealof a society of free and responsible individuals. 2010 was the 50th anniversary year of the founding of Liberty Fund.It is part of the Online Library of Liberty web sitehttp://oll.libertyfund.org, whichwas established in 2004 in order to further the educational goals of LibertyFund, Inc.To find out more about the author or title, to use the site's powerful search engine, tosee other titles in other formats (HTML, facsimile PDF), or to make use of thehundreds of essays, educational aids, and study guides, please visit the OLL web site.This title is also part of the Portable Library of Liberty DVD which contains over 1,000 books and quotes about liberty and power, and is available free of charge uponrequest.The cuneiform inscription that appears in the logo and serves as a design element inall Liberty Fund books and web sites is the earliest-known written appearance of theword “freedom” (amagi), or “liberty.” It is taken from a clay document written about2300 B.C. in the Sumerian city-state of Lagash, in present day Iraq.To find out more about Liberty Fund, Inc., or the Online Library of Liberty Project, please contact the Director atoll@libertyfund.org.
Copy provided courtesy of: http://www.ProtectOurLiberty.org
 
Edition Used:
The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and  Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays on the Origin and Natureof Natural Law and on Luxury,
edited and with an Introduction by Béla Kapossy andRichard Whitmore (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008).Author:Emer de VattelEditor:Béla KapossyEditor:Richard Whatmore
About This Title:
A republication of the 1797 translation of Vattel’s work, along with new Englishtranslations of 3 early essays.
Online Library of Liberty: The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to theConduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays on the Origin and Nature of  Natural Law and on Luxury (LF ed.)PLL v6.0 (generated September, 2011)
3
http://oll.libertyfund.org/title/2246
Copy provided courtesy of: http://www.ProtectOurLiberty.org
 
§211.What is oucountry.§212.Citizens andnatives.§213.Inhabitants.§214.Naturalisation.
[Back to Table of Contents]
CHAPTER XIX
Of Our Native Country, And Several Things That Relate To It.
The whole of the countries possessed by a nation and subject toits laws, forms, as we have already said, its territory, and is thecommon country of all the individuals of the nation. We have been obliged to anticipate the definition of the term,
native country
(§122), becauseour subject led us to treat of the love of our country,—a virtue so excellent and sonecessary in a state. Supposing then this definition already known, it remains that weshould explain several things that have a relation to this subject, and answer thequestions that naturally arise from it.The citizens are the members of the civil society: bound to thissociety by certain duties, and subject to its authority, they equally participate in its advantages. The natives, or natural-borncitizens, are those born in the country, of parents who are citizens. As the societycannot exist and perpetuate itself otherwise than by the children of the citizens, thosechildren naturally follow the condition of their fathers, and succeed to all their rights.The society is supposed to desire this, in consequence of what it owes to its own preservation; and it is presumed, as matter of course, that each citizen, on enteringinto society, reserves to his children the right of becoming members of it. The countryof the fathers is therefore that of the children; and these become true citizens merely by their tacit consent. We shall soon see, whether, on their coming to the years of discretion, they may renounce their right, and what they owe to the society in whichthey were born. I say, that, in order to be of the country, it is necessary that a person be born of a father who is a citizen; for if he is born there of a foreigner, it will beonly the place of his birth, and not his country.The inhabitants, as distinguished from citizens, are foreigners,who are permitted to settle and stay in the country. Bound to thesociety by their residence, they are subject to the laws of the state, while they reside init; and they are obliged to defend it, because it grants them protection, though they donot participate in all the rights of citizens. They enjoy only the advantages which thelaw or custom gives them. The
perpetual inhabitants
are those who have received theright of perpetual residence. These are a kind of citizens of an inferior order, and areunited to the society, without participating in all its advantages. Their children followthe condition of their fathers; and as the state has given to these the right of perpetualresidence, their right passes to their posterity.A nation, or the sovereign who represents it, may grant to aforeigner the quality of citizen, by admitting him into the body of the political society. This is called
naturalisation.
There are some states in which thesovereign cannot grant to a foreigner all the rights of citizens,—for example, that of holding public offices,—and where, consequently, he has the power of granting only
Online Library of Liberty: The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to theConduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays on the Origin and Nature of  Natural Law and on Luxury (LF ed.)PLL v6.0 (generated September, 2011)
130
http://oll.libertyfund.org/title/2246
Copy provided courtesy of: http://www.ProtectOurLiberty.org

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