Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Ain’t misbehaving - do British children need the army to sort them out?

Ain’t misbehaving - do British children need the army to sort them out?

Ratings: (0)|Views: 33 |Likes:
Published by Harley Richardson
Do teachers – and parents, passers by and the general public – all need the back-up of the army to deal with this problem inside and outside the classroom? Can we all learn a lesson in discipline from the one section of society that really knows about authority and how to do it? Or is this a step too far away from education in the drive to sort out the basics of civility?

(Audience notes from a Battle of Ideas 2011 debate)
Do teachers – and parents, passers by and the general public – all need the back-up of the army to deal with this problem inside and outside the classroom? Can we all learn a lesson in discipline from the one section of society that really knows about authority and how to do it? Or is this a step too far away from education in the drive to sort out the basics of civility?

(Audience notes from a Battle of Ideas 2011 debate)

More info:

Categories:Types, Speeches
Published by: Harley Richardson on Nov 09, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as ODT, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Ain't Misbehaving: Do British children need the army to sortthem out?
Battle of Ideas debate, 30 Oct 2011Notes by Harley Richardson
Disclaimer 
These are my sketchy personal notes of debates at the Battle of Ideas 2011, which I attended in a personal capacity. thought they might be of interest to folks who weren't able to attend. They're not comprehensive – I'm a fast typer but some of the speakers were faster talkers - and any quotes I give are from memory and may not be 100% accurate. tried to capture the main points I thought each speaker was making, but if you're one of those speakers and you feel I'vemisrepresented you, please let me know. I've flagged up the names of questioners from the audience where I know them.
Blurb
Fromhttp://www.battleofideas.org.uk/index.php/2011/session_detail/5751/ The Conservative-led coalition white paper on ‘the importance of teaching’ appears to have gone back tobasics on behaviour in schools. The army has even been called in with the Troops to Teachers proposal for ex-soldiers to go into failing schools. But most teachers are already familiar with ‘behaviour managementstrategies’ (aka, ‘getting the buggers to behave’) and parents know all about the ‘naughty step’ from TVprogrammes. So is the hard line on behaviour a step too far by the new government? Or, as David Starkeyclaimed in the Channel 4 programme
Jamie’s Dream School 
earlier this year, is behaviour so bad even thebest teachers can’t deal with it unless they become ‘like lion tamers dealing with savage beasts’.Meanwhile, many school-age children were involved in the riots in London and other English cities in August,leading many to lament a more general collapse of adult authorty. Every day, schools receive complaintsfrom shop owners and bus drivers about the general rowdiness and rudeness of schoolchildren, so at leastone hardline comprehensive (the Mossbourne Academy in Hackney) has banned its children from enteringlocal shops at all. So, as a BBC
Panorama
programme ‘Classroom Warriors’ hinted earlier this year, will thearmy make the difference for a generation of softies who do not know what it means to be disciplined? After all, a recent study showed ex-soldiers made a difference in New York schools, and British comprehensiveswith cadet squads claim to be showing improvement in exam results as well. So why not roll it out across thecountry as an example of what the Big Society really means?So do teachers – and parents, passers by and the general public – all need the back-up of the army to dealwith this problem inside and outside the classroom? Can we all learn a lesson in discipline from the onesection of society that really knows about authority and how to do it? Or is this a step too far away fromeducation in the drive to sort out the basics of civility? Should schools focus on teaching, and make that thebasis of discipline rather than seeing it as an entirely separate problem? Do we really need the army to do a job on the yobs - or are British kids really just ‘being themselves’ and not misbehaving at all?
Speakers
Michael Shaw
, section editor, Times Educational Supplement; invented the term 'happy slapping'.
Jamie Bartlett
, head of violence and extremism programme, Demos; writer on extremism and bingedrinkings.
Daisy Christodoulou
, English teacher; author 
Skills and Knowledge in the UK Curriculum
(publishedshortly)
Dr Mark Taylor 
, assistant head, Addey and Stanhope comprehensive school; London convenor, Insitute of Ideas Education Forum
Chair: Kevin Rooney
, head of social science, Queens' School, Bushey; Insitute of Ideas Education Forum
Michael Shaw 
Doesn't think there's a crisis of child behaviour which needs the army to sort it out.
 
Idea of bringing in the army dates back to WWI at least. GK Chesterton said he was bored of the discussionback in 1910.1933 craze for smashing in windows. Lord Baden Powell said: promising sign of spirit of adventure.Adrian Elliot, author 
State Schools Since the 1950s: The Good News,
looks at cases of extreme violenceover the years. In Hull 5 boys tried a boy and set him on fire. Their punishment was they had to pay £5 fineand bring him flowers in hospital.There's a history of school shootings in UK. In 1938 the shooting of a teacher was the main story in theTimes that day – but was not followed up.Some things have got better, others got worse.Spread of low-level misbehaviour in classroom and increasing lack of parental respect. Truancy has gonedown.Has seen an example of an army school. Wasn't what you'd expect, children liked the extra attention.
Jamie Bartlett 
His dad was a computer programmer, gave him and his siblings a list of things they had to do each week anddocked 10p every time they missed some thing off.Everybody has an anecdote of what parenting they think works. Anecdotes don't tell the whole picture > sowe need research.All the problems are with young men – too much testosterone, not being expended. Always been a problem.Need to give them more opportunities to channel that in a positive fashion.What does the army bring? Discipline, structure, task orientation. All fundamental to young people'scharacter. Children need love and discipline. The latter very difficult for parents today due to time pressures.UK comes somewhere near bottom of list of time spent with children.Disciplined structure and activity can fill the gap. Gives them the opportunity to see beyond their ownhorizons. One of the reasons young people drawn into extremism because it offers a sense of adventure. Ina corrosive and destructive way.Every cadet or scout class is oversubscribed.Liberals don't like it very much, but a little bit of discipline does us all some good.
Daisy Christodoulou
A lot of military metaphors about – classroom as a battleground, teachers donning armour.Rather than seeing pupils and children on separate sides of No Man's Land, need to view them both as onthe same side. The enemy would then be the intangible force of ignorance.Although the army is hierarchical, it's not necessarily that top down. You want to delegate decisions to thepeople on the ground who have the best information. Captains have more freedom in what they can do thanteachers.General Patten's maxim: Never tell a man how to do something, tell them what you want them to do, and youwill be surprised by their ingenuity.Teachers told in micro-detail what they have to do. But very little about what the aim is.
 
Army would be wiped out if it had no aim, classrooms going that way. Could learn a lot from the army.
Mark Taylor 
Should we get the army into schools? No.Or, they should be there, if he can go to Afghanistan to advise them on the history of the situation.Behaviour is now a subject – so people have all kind of tips on what to do. And some teachers need it –throws you into areas of authority and personal freedom. (His top tip - if you're going to use glue, put it outbefore the lesson, otherwise there will be disruption.)No wider understanding in sociey about how you create order.Not in favour of army... but you have to recognise people don't get on bus because there's kids on it... peopleback off...On TV... any education show you can name... filmmakers always pick up on the behaviour. We don't seeanything about the joy of education.We don't expect kids to sit quiet and pay attention. Behaviour no longer seen in a scholarly way – a matter of concentration – it's been reduced to discipline.
Discussion
Kevin Rooney:
Is there really no crisis now?
Jamie Bartlett:
We're in a state of perpetual crisis. Society has always struggled to socialise young men inparticular. No longer any wars, so need to find some other way to keep them occupied.
Mark Taylor:
Yes, there's a crisis when 50 year old men skateboard down Brighton beach, the Stone Rosesare reforming and look the same as they did in 1990 – crisis of growing up, of adult expectations of students.Exam boards don't expect much of them. Yes there's Gifted and Talented, but there's a wider problem.
Kevin Rooney:
Isn't parenting just a matter of personal choice?
Jamie Bartlett:
Some very general guidelines that seem on aggregate to make a lot of difference.Very generic.
Michael Shaw:
Lots of private schools now offering parenting classes, so there is a demand.
Kevin Rooney:
His pupils get good results, so lets them chew gum. Are people
exercising 
authority but not
in
authority?
Mark Taylor:
In his new job, been given the poison chalice of behaviour management. A lot of kids don't likeit when other kids muck about and disrupt their learning.OK to learn with mobile phone, as long as the teacher has the authority to push them up to the next level.Old school Hitler types obsessed with authority, end up shouting at children all the time, don't get anywherein long run.Not enough people have an understanding of what it means to have children socialised for learning.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->