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Capricorn 3: The human soul receptive to growth and understanding.

Capricorn 3: The human soul receptive to growth and understanding.

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Published by Starling
Capricorn 3: The human soul receptive to growth and understanding.

The word human descends from the Indo-European (IE) root dhghem- which means “earth.” Its paronyms include the words chthonic (of the underworld), autochthon (one of the earliest known inhabitants of a place; an aborigine; one that springs from the soil he inhabits), chamaephyte (a low-growing perennial plant whose dormant overwintering buds are borne at or just above the surface of the ground), chameleon (a lizard characterized by the ability to change color), chamomile (an aromatic perennial herb), germander (an aromatic planet with purplish or reddish flowers), humble, humiliate, humility, humus (a brown or black organic substance consisting of partially or wholly decayed vegetable or animal matter), omerta (rule or code that prohibits speaking or divulging information about certain activities), exhume, homage, hombre, hominid, humane, chernozem (a very black topsoil, rich in humus), and sierozem (soils found in cool to temperate arid regions).

The word soul has many definitions, one of the most common being “the immaterial part of a person; the actuating cause of an individual life.” The origin of the word is unknown. According to the Online Etymology Dictionary its most proximate root is the Old English sawol, the “spiritual and emotional part of a person, animate existence.” This word is traced back to the Pre-Germanic saiwalo but is also related to the Old Norse sala, Old Frisian sele, Middle Dutch ziel, Old High German seula, and the Gothic saiwala among others. The word may have originally meant “coming from or belonging to the sea” since in many traditions “that was supposed to be the stopping place of the soul before birth or after death.”

The word receive descends from the IE root kap-, “to grasp.” Its paronyms include heddle (one of the sets of parallel doubled threads in a loom), heavy, haven, hawk (bird of prey), gaff (a large iron hook attached to a pole), heft, cable, caitiff (a despicable coward; a wretch), capias (a warrant for arrest), capture, catch, cater, chase (to pursue), cop (to take unlawfully or without permission), copper (a police officer), accept, anticipate, conceive, deceive, have, hawk, receive, inception, occupy, participate, perceive, recipe, recover, hoof, behoove, copepod (minute marine and freshwater crustaceans), and the compound behave.

The word growth descends from the IE root ghre- which means “to grow, become green” and from which also descend the words green, grass, and graze.

The word under descends from the IE root ndher- which means “under.” Its paronyms include inferior, infernal, inferno, and the prefixes infra- and under-.

The word stand descends from the IE root sta- which means “to stand.” Among its dozens of paronyms are: arrest, cost, desist, destitute, distant, ecstasy, estate, extant, the prefix histo-, instant, institute, obstacle, oust, post, prostrate, rest, resist, restore, stable, stage, stall, stance, starling, state, station, status, stay, steed, stead, stern, still, stool, store, stow, stud, subsist, substitute, and system.

THEMES: The first theme concerns that which lies UNDER. The word under is a part of the compound keyword understand. It also can be used in forming a compound with a second keyword growth, i.e. undergrowth which means “low-growing plants, saplings, and shrubs beneath trees in a forest.” Notably, several paronyms of human describe the soil (humus, sierozem, chernozem) in which plants (chamomile, chamaephyte, germander) and other things grow (autochthon). Also, it is notable that another paronym of growth is chthonic which means ‘underworld.’

Another theme concerns THE SEA and things that live in, emerge from, and/or return to it. Recall that saewel-, the root of soul, may have originally meant “coming from or belong to the sea.” Then there is copepod, a paronym of receive that means “a marine and freshwater crustacean.” Another paronym of receive is gaff whic
Capricorn 3: The human soul receptive to growth and understanding.

The word human descends from the Indo-European (IE) root dhghem- which means “earth.” Its paronyms include the words chthonic (of the underworld), autochthon (one of the earliest known inhabitants of a place; an aborigine; one that springs from the soil he inhabits), chamaephyte (a low-growing perennial plant whose dormant overwintering buds are borne at or just above the surface of the ground), chameleon (a lizard characterized by the ability to change color), chamomile (an aromatic perennial herb), germander (an aromatic planet with purplish or reddish flowers), humble, humiliate, humility, humus (a brown or black organic substance consisting of partially or wholly decayed vegetable or animal matter), omerta (rule or code that prohibits speaking or divulging information about certain activities), exhume, homage, hombre, hominid, humane, chernozem (a very black topsoil, rich in humus), and sierozem (soils found in cool to temperate arid regions).

The word soul has many definitions, one of the most common being “the immaterial part of a person; the actuating cause of an individual life.” The origin of the word is unknown. According to the Online Etymology Dictionary its most proximate root is the Old English sawol, the “spiritual and emotional part of a person, animate existence.” This word is traced back to the Pre-Germanic saiwalo but is also related to the Old Norse sala, Old Frisian sele, Middle Dutch ziel, Old High German seula, and the Gothic saiwala among others. The word may have originally meant “coming from or belonging to the sea” since in many traditions “that was supposed to be the stopping place of the soul before birth or after death.”

The word receive descends from the IE root kap-, “to grasp.” Its paronyms include heddle (one of the sets of parallel doubled threads in a loom), heavy, haven, hawk (bird of prey), gaff (a large iron hook attached to a pole), heft, cable, caitiff (a despicable coward; a wretch), capias (a warrant for arrest), capture, catch, cater, chase (to pursue), cop (to take unlawfully or without permission), copper (a police officer), accept, anticipate, conceive, deceive, have, hawk, receive, inception, occupy, participate, perceive, recipe, recover, hoof, behoove, copepod (minute marine and freshwater crustaceans), and the compound behave.

The word growth descends from the IE root ghre- which means “to grow, become green” and from which also descend the words green, grass, and graze.

The word under descends from the IE root ndher- which means “under.” Its paronyms include inferior, infernal, inferno, and the prefixes infra- and under-.

The word stand descends from the IE root sta- which means “to stand.” Among its dozens of paronyms are: arrest, cost, desist, destitute, distant, ecstasy, estate, extant, the prefix histo-, instant, institute, obstacle, oust, post, prostrate, rest, resist, restore, stable, stage, stall, stance, starling, state, station, status, stay, steed, stead, stern, still, stool, store, stow, stud, subsist, substitute, and system.

THEMES: The first theme concerns that which lies UNDER. The word under is a part of the compound keyword understand. It also can be used in forming a compound with a second keyword growth, i.e. undergrowth which means “low-growing plants, saplings, and shrubs beneath trees in a forest.” Notably, several paronyms of human describe the soil (humus, sierozem, chernozem) in which plants (chamomile, chamaephyte, germander) and other things grow (autochthon). Also, it is notable that another paronym of growth is chthonic which means ‘underworld.’

Another theme concerns THE SEA and things that live in, emerge from, and/or return to it. Recall that saewel-, the root of soul, may have originally meant “coming from or belong to the sea.” Then there is copepod, a paronym of receive that means “a marine and freshwater crustacean.” Another paronym of receive is gaff whic

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Published by: Starling on Nov 11, 2011
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11/11/2011

 
Starling Hunter © 2011 1
Capricorn 3: The human soul receptive to growth andunderstanding.
The word
human
descends fromthe Indo-European (IE) root 
dhghem-
 
which means “earth.”
1
Itsparonyms include the words
chthonic 
(of the underworld)
 ,autochthon 
(one of the earliest known inhabitants of a place; anaborigine; one that springs from thesoil he inhabits)
 , chamaephyte 
(a low-growing perennial plant whosedormant overwintering buds are borne at or just above the surface of theground)
 , chameleon 
(a lizard characterized by the ability to changecolor)
 , chamomile ( 
an aromatic perennial herb)
 , germander 
(an aromaticplanet with purplish or reddish flowers)
 , humble, humiliate, humility,humus 
(a brown or black organic substance consisting of partially orwholly decayed vegetable or animal matter)
 , omerta ( 
rule or code that prohibits speaking or divulging information about certain activities)
 ,exhume, homage, hombre 
,
hominid, humane, chernozem ( 
a very black topsoil, rich in humus), and
sierozem 
(soils found in cool to temperatearid regions)
.
 The word
soul
has many definitions, one of the most common being
“the immaterial part of a person; the actuating cause of an individual
life
.
2
The origin of the word is unknown. According to the
Online Etymology Dictionary 
its most proximate root is the Old English
sawol 
,
the “spiritual and emotional part of a person, animate existence.”
3
Thisword is traced back to the Pre-Germanic
saiwalo 
but is also related tothe Old Norse
sala 
, Old Frisian
sele 
, Middle Dutch
ziel,
Old High German
1 Watkins, C. (2000), The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo European Roots, p. 202 http://onelook.com/?w=soul3 http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=soul
 
Starling Hunter © 2011 2
seula,
and the Gothic
saiwala 
among others. The word may have
originally meant “coming from or belonging to the sea” since in manytraditions “that was supposed
to be the stopping place of the soul before
birth or after death.”
4
 The word
receive
descends from the IE root 
kap-
, “to grasp.”
5
Itsparonyms include
heddle 
(one of the sets of parallel doubled threads in aloom),
heavy 
,
haven 
,
hawk 
(bird of prey),
 gaff  
(a large iron hook attached to a pole),
heft 
,
cable 
,
caitiff  
(a despicable coward; a wretch),
capias 
(a warrant for arrest),
capture 
,
catch 
,
cater 
,
chase 
(to pursue),
co
(to take unlawfully or without permission),
copper 
(a police officer),
accept 
,
anticipate 
,
conceive 
,
deceive 
,
have 
,
hawk,
 
receive, inception,occupy, participate, perceive, recipe, recover, hoof, behoove, copepod 
 (minute marine and freshwater crustaceans), and the compound
behave 
.The word
growth
descends from the IE root 
ghre-
which means
togrow, become green” and from which also descend the words
 green, grass,
and
 graze.
6
 The word 
under
descends from the IE root 
ndher-
which means
“under.” Its paronyms include
 
inferior, infernal, inferno 
, and the prefixes
infra- 
and
under- 
.The word
stand
descends from the IE root 
sta-
 
which means “tostand.”
Among its dozens of paronyms are:
arrest,
 
cost, desist, destitute,distant, ecstasy, estate, extant 
, the prefix
histo-,
 
instant, institute,obstacle, oust, post, prostrate, rest, resist, restore, stable, stage, stall,stance, starling, state, station, status, stay, steed, stead, stern, still,stool, store, stow, stud, subsist, substitute,
and
system.
 
THEMES:
The first theme concerns that which lies
UNDER
. The word
under 
is a part of the compound keyword
understand
. It also can be usedin forming a compound with a second keyword
growth
, i.e.
undergrowth 
 
4 http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=soul5 Watkins, C. (2000), The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo European Roots, p. 376 Watkins, C. (2000), The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo European Roots, p. 317 Watkins, C. (2000), The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo European Roots, p. 84

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