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"Founding Rivals" Free Chapter

"Founding Rivals" Free Chapter

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Published by Regnery Publishing
James Madison and James Monroe were friends, Founding Fathers, and ran against each other in the most important congressional race in American history.

Yet historians have virtually ignored this incredible story. Until now.

In Founding Rivals: Madison vs. Monroe, the Bill of Rights, and the Election That Saved a Nation author Chris DeRose reveals one of the most important but untold stories in American history—one that determined the future of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the very definition of America.

Want to learn more? Click here: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/159698192X/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tnam10-20&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399373&creativeASIN=159698192X
James Madison and James Monroe were friends, Founding Fathers, and ran against each other in the most important congressional race in American history.

Yet historians have virtually ignored this incredible story. Until now.

In Founding Rivals: Madison vs. Monroe, the Bill of Rights, and the Election That Saved a Nation author Chris DeRose reveals one of the most important but untold stories in American history—one that determined the future of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the very definition of America.

Want to learn more? Click here: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/159698192X/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tnam10-20&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399373&creativeASIN=159698192X

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Published by: Regnery Publishing on Nov 11, 2011
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Founding Rivals
the Bill of Rights andthe Election That Saved a Nation
 Madison 
 vs.
Monroe 
CHRIS DeROSE
 james madison james monRoe
 
x 
Prologue 
Opening Days
“No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore theinvisible hand, which conducts the affairs of men, morethan the people of the United States. Every step, by whichthey have advanced to the character of an independent nation, seems to have been distinguished by some tokenof providential agency.”
—George Washington,First Presidential Address to Congress
O
n April 30, 1789, a sea of people spilled into the streets of thecity of New York, standing shoulder to shoulder, crowding onrooftops, hanging out of open windows, vying for a view. Theirfocus was the second-story balcony of Federal Hall, the “large and ele-gant Bible” placed atop a crimson-draped table, and the closed door thatwould open at any minute.
1
But as the hours went by, nothing happened.The First Congress of the United States of America under the newConstitution had gathered that morning to receive General GeorgeWashington as the new president, but the ceremony was delayed by fightsabout how that president should be received. One senator pointed outthat the House of Lords is seated when the king addresses Parliament,but the House of Commons stands. Another explained that the Com-mons stood because they had no chairs to sit in. A third dismissed out-right the idea of using or even consulting British protocol. The dispute
 
 x 
 
Prologue 
among the legislators dragged on. It was a portrait in miniature of theessential differences still dividing the young nation, and a reminder of just how precarious the very existence of the United States of Americawas.It seems inevitable to us today—the steady march of history from thecolonial era to independence, a revolution against the greatest empire inthe world, ending in the establishment of republican government, ratherthan in anarchy or despotism. In truth, the path to this place was narrowand threatened by peril at every turn. It could all have turned out verydifferently.When the door finally opened and Washington stepped out onto thebalcony with members of Congress, the crowd erupted in cheers. Thetriumph of this momentous day had been achieved by a narrow margin;one man staring out at the sea of revelers knew just how narrow. Con-gressman James Madison was witnessing the birth of a creation that borehis stamp more than anyone else’s. But his own presence on that balconyhad been decided by a swing of only 169 votes.Nobody was there to see
him
, of course, and at 5'4"anyone whotried would likely have failed to find him. But fame did not motivateMadison. His best-known writings were anonymous. He would ask oth-ers to propose his ideas if he thought that they were less likely to succeedcoming from him. Madison was motivated by the desire to create agovernment that worked for a union of states. This day was a productof his success.But Madison was consumed by what he had yet to do. The UnitedStates had a crippling national debt, no credit, no revenue system, andno means of honoring obligations or meeting even the government’s mostbasic responsibilities. As of March 4, Rhode Island and North Carolinahad officially become independent states, “as independent as any othernation,” in the words of one newspaper.
2
Rhode Island sea captains hadlowered the flag of the United States and raised their state’s flag.
3
RhodeIsland had rejected the Constitution outright, and North Carolina wasrefusing to ratify until a bill of rights was passed. Meanwhile, New Yorkand Virginia had called for a new constitutional convention. If two-thirds

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