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Common Sense by Thomas Paine

Common Sense by Thomas Paine

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Published by: serge89 on Nov 12, 2011
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1776COMMON SENSEThomas Paine( February 14, 1776 )
Paine, Thomas (1737-1809) - An Englishman who came to Americain 1774, he was a political philosopher who promoted changethrough revolution rather than reform. Paine is most renowned for his activities advocating democracy. Common Sense (1776) - Thiswidely-read pamphlet argued for America’s immediate separation from England. It is considered by many to be the catalyst that roused public feeling and was most influential in the creation of the Declaration of Independence.
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3CHAPTER 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4OF THE ORIGIN AND DESIGN OF GOVERNMENT INGENERAL. WITH CONCISE REMARKS ON THE ENGLISHCONSTITUTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4CHAPTER 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9OF MONARCHY AND HEREDITARY SUCCESSION . . . 9CHAPTER 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17THOUGHTS OF THE PRESENT STATE OF AMERICAN AFFAIRS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17CHAPTER 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31OF THE PRESENT ABILITY OF AMERICA, WITH SOMEMISCELLANEOUS REFLECTIONS . . . . . . . . 31APPENDIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40EPISTLE TO QUAKERS . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
 
INTRODUCTION
PERHAPS the sentiments contained in the following pages, are notyet sufficiently fashionable to procure them general favor; a longhabit of not thinking a thing wrong, gives it a superficialappearance of being right, and raises at first a formidable outcry indefence of custom. But tumult soon subsides. Time makes moreconverts than reason.As a long and violent abuse of power is generally the means ofcalling the right of it in question, (and in matters too which mightnever have been thought of, had not the sufferers been aggravatedinto the inquiry,) and as the king of England hath undertaken inhis own right, to support the parliament in what he calls theirs, andas the good people of this country are grievously oppressed by thecombination, they have an undoubted privilege to inquire into thepretensions of both, and equally to reject the usurpations of either.In the following sheets, the author hath studiously avoided everything which is personal among ourselves. Compliments as well ascensure to individuals make no part thereof. The wise and theworthy need not the triumph of a pamphlet; and those whosesentiments are injudicious or unfriendly, will cease of themselves,unless too much pains is bestowed upon their conversion.The cause of America is, in a great measure, the cause of allmankind. Many circumstances have, and will arise, which are notlocal, but universal, and through which the principles of all loversof mankind are affected, and in the event of which, their affectionsare interested. The laying a country desolate with fire and sword,declaring war against the natural rights of all mankind, andextirpating the defenders thereof from the face of the earth, is theconcern of every man to whom nature hath given the power offeeling; of which class, regardless of party censure, is THEAUTHOR. - Philadelphia, Feb. 14, 1776.

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