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Nuclear War Survival

Nuclear War Survival

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Published by: api-3840428 on Oct 18, 2008
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H-20 / June 1985
PROTECTION IN THE
NUCLEAR AGE

THE FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ACT OF 1950, AS AMENDED
Public Law 920-81st Congress
(50 usc App. 2251-2297)

It is the policy and intent of Congress to provide a system of civil
defense for the protection of life and property in the United
States.... The term \u201ccivil defense\u201d means all those activities and
measures designed to minimize the effects upon the civilian population
caused by an attack upon the United States. The Administrator is
authorized, in order to carry out the above-mentioned purposes, to ...
publicly disseminate appropriate civil defense Information by all
appropriate means.

Federal Emergency Management Agency
Washington, D.C. 20472
FOREWORD

The primary goal of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is
to protect lives and reduce property loss from disasters and
emergencies. To accomplish this, FEMA works with state and local
governments to help them deliver better, more effective emergency
management services across the whole spectrum of hazards\u2014both natural
and man-made.

Regardless of the type, size, or severity of an emergency, certain
basic capabilities are needed for an effective response: evacuation,
shelter, communications, direction and control, continuity of govern-
ment, resource management, law and order, and food and medical
supplies. FEMA developed its Integrated Emergency Management System to
focus efforts on building these and other generic capabilities needed
to cope with a wide range of hazards.

This publication provides basic preparedness guidance combined with
specific measures useful in national security emergencies.
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Part 1: THE EFFECTS OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS. . . . . . . 1
Part2:

WARNING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Part 3: POPULATION PROTECTION. . . . . . . . . . . 12
Part 4: SHELTER LIVING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Appendix A: PERMANENT SHELTERS. . . . . . . . . . . 31
Appendix B: EXPEDIENT FALLOUT SHELTER\u2014
ABOVE-GROUND DOOR-COVERED SHELTER. . . . . . . . . 32
Appendix C: EXPEDIENT FALLOUT SHELTER\u2014
DOOR-COVERED TRENCH SHELTER. . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Appendix D: EXPEDIENT FALLOUT SHELTER\u2014
LOG-COVERED TRENCH SHELTER. . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

INTRODUCTION

Most counties and cities throughout the country have civil
preparedness programs to reduce the loss of life and property in the
event of major emergencies. These emergencies can range from natural
disasters such as hurricanes, floods, or tornadoes to man-made
emergencies like hazardous materials spills, fire, or nuclear attack.

This booklet focuses on the ultimate disaster\u2014nuclear attack. It
discusses what individuals and families can do to improve their
chances for survival in the event of a nuclear attack on the United
States. Basic information is provided on the physical effects of a
nuclear detonation, attack warning signals, and what to do before,
during, and after an attack.

Much has been done to address emergency needs unique to nuclear
attack. Public fallout shelter space has been identified for millions.
In addition, some warning and communications networks have been
\u201chardened\u201d against blast and electronic disruptions, preparations have
been made to measure fallout radiation, and many local emergency
services personnel have been trained in use of radiation detection
instruments and other emergency skills.

This booklet contains general information applicable anywhere in the
United States to supplement specific local instructions. Local plans
are more detailed and are adapted to particular communities. When
local instructions differ from this general guidance, thelocal
instructions should always take precedence.

For more information on plans for your community, contact your local
or state emergency management (civil defense) office.

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