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Document #8 - Chief Librarian's Report

Document #8 - Chief Librarian's Report

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Published by Gary Romero

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Published by: Gary Romero on Nov 14, 2011
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11/14/2011

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T
he
C
hief
L
ibrarian
s
eporT
Library News HighlightsNovember 16, 2011
1. T
he
e
uro
f
esTivaL
b
rings
 
The
W
orLd
 
To
ids
 
aT
dCpL
From
madeleines
to mask-making, old-fashioned puppet shows to Skype, the 2011 Kids
Euro Fest was lled with wonder and creativity. Participants in this fourth Kids EuroFestinvolved 27 member countries of the EU, and 16 cultural institution collaborators. DCPLoffered Euro Fest programs at every library. Here are highlights:UNICEF and Good Will Ambassador and master puppeteer Juha Laukkanen and his assistantdescribed Finnish Lapland through a popular tale, “told” by the puppets, about a mean trollwho lives inside a mountain. The children then made snowman puppets. This program washeld at Georgetown and Northeast Libraries.In partnership with the Imavere PohikoolElementary School in Estonia, Colleen Semitekol,Children’s Librarian at Palisades Library hosteda Skype story time with Ille Krimm and her Language Arts class. Colleen read three books inEnglish to the children at Palisades, and by Skype,to the children in Estonia. In turn, children at theschool read a traditional fairy tale in Estonian. A pianist in Estonia played the closing song—“If You’re Happy and You Know It”—and thechildren sang along, rst in Estonian and then inEnglish. The program was held on October 20
th
 
in honor of Estonia’s annual National ReadAloud Day.Maltese folktales and traditional Maltese riddles wereused in a shadow puppet show, “Why Bats Fly at Night.” Jess Stork, also at Palisades, created the story
after reading
Studies of Maltese Folklore
. The bat, whoconsidered himself too special to be grouped with other animals, was punished for his arrogance and made to yonly in the dark of night.
Document #8Board of Library Trustees Meeting November 16, 2011
 
2. C
heCKing
o
uT
e-b
ooKs
? J
oin
 
The
C
roWd
!
The rich offerings of e-books that can be digitally downloaded to e-readers, tablets,and mobile devices, are in high demand among DCPL users. With over 10,000 titlesto choose from, there has been an exponential increase in the number of downloadsfrom the Library collection. Almost 60,000 e-books were downloaded this past scalyear. Amazon and Overdrive, the company contracted to provide e-books to DCPL,launched a long-awaited lending program for Kindles in late September. As a resultof that and as more people use e-devices as “readers,” we expect the interest anddemand to continue to grow. In the month of September alone, 9,420 e-books were“checked out.”
3. sTar C
onTinues
W
iTh
g
ranT
f
unds
Sing Talk and Read (STAR) Workshops have begun in libraries and other locations.A grant from Better World Books is funding this effort. Leaders follow a prescribedseries of lessons for parents and caregivers that give them fun, easy skills that engagechildren, from newborns to age 3 years, and get them ready to learn how to read.The skills show how to use singing, play, talking, and rhyming as learning tools. TheLibrary’s most recent partner is the New Heights Program at the DC Public Schools,which is for pregnant teens and teens who have recently become parents. Sevenschools have either received or signed up for the program in all areas of the District.Micki Freeny is coordinating this effort.
4. a
nd
a
noTher 
g
ranT
-f
unded
L
iTeraCy
 i
niTiaTive
b
egins
The Family Literacy Involvement Program (FLIP), aimed at families with childrenfrom newborn to age 8 years, granted an award to DCPL and its partner, the NationalChildren’s Museum in Maryland, for a new approach to early literacy. Washington,DC, was one of ten cities across the country whose application was accepted for funding. The proposal was submitted by DCPL’s Wendy Lukehart, Youth CollectionsCoordinator, and the National Children’s Museum. The core of the project is thecirculation of kits that contain a book, suggestions on how to engage children inthe reading experience, and instructions and materials for related activities to becompleted in the home. The Library and Museum are replicating the kits to providemultiple copies for circulation at the Dorothy I. Height/Benning Library and theMuseum’s Launch Zone. Major funding for this initiative was provided by theInstitute of Museum and Library Services.
5. n
eW
s
Taff
h
ired
The Library’s Public Services was given a needed boost in September and October with the completion of a major hiring initiative to help get ready for the threenew libraries opening in the next several months. In addition to several internal promotions, 19 of the remaining 31 people hired—61%—are DC residents. Thisreects DCPLs ongoing commitment to the city-wide goal of providing employmentopportunities for District residents. We reached an exciting new milestone by hiringve of DCPL’s former Teens of Distinction as Library Technicians. The new staff members are assigned throughout the system for training. Welcome!
2
 
6. a
naCosTia
L
ibrary
T
eaChes
C
roCheT
 
and
esearCh
s
KiLLs
 
A new children’s program, “Hooks N’ Books,” teaches children, tweens, and adults basic crocheting stitches on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. The program hasattracted boys and girls, and all are close to mastering the basic stitches of a grannysquare. Every crochet and knitting book has been checked out and several have been put on reserve. Staff members also used a comprehensive website for videoinstruction and quick tips during classes. One goal of “Hooks N’ Books” is thecompletion of an Anacostia Library quilt by February for Black History Month.
7. d
ream
C
iTy
a
uThors
C
ome
 
To
W
aTha
T. d
anieL
/s
haW
L
ibrary
Harry S. Jaffe and Tom Sherwood led a panel discussion at Watha T. Daniel/Shaw Library about DC government then-and-now. The city’s workings fascinatedthe two men and they joined forces to write
 Dream City: Race, Power, and the Decline of Washington, DC 
, which was published in 1994. The book traces theimpact on city government of turmoil through the civil rights movement, riots andracial polarization after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., congressionaldomination of the city, and tensions generated by competing local economic andsocial interests. The panelists talked to the audience of roughly 100 people about theinuence of the history of DC government on its functioning today. The presentationstimulated a lively Q&A.
 
8. s
haring
 
The
s
uCCesses
 
of
dCpL’
s
T
een
p
rograms
 
and
s
erviCes
Rebecca Renard, Teens of Distinction Program Coordinator, was the invited keynotespeaker at the October North Carolina Library Association’s Biannual Conference.This year’s conference theme was
 Libraries: The Next Generation
. Weaving storiesand key lessons learned from her experiences over the last four years while workingwith teens at DCPL, Rebecca discussed the need to engage teens and the communityin projects of importance to them, as well as the myth that libraries will soon becomeirrelevant to current users and potential users. Rebecca was also asked recentlyto join the Mayor’s “One City Summer Fun Steering Committee,” which is beingorganized to develop a comprehensive and effective summer program for DC youthin 2012.
3

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