Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Vampire

Vampire

Ratings: (0)|Views: 56|Likes:
Published by Jhonray Cruz Alday
Vampire
Vampire

More info:

Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Jhonray Cruz Alday on Nov 15, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/02/2012

pdf

text

original

 
Vampire
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see  Vampire (disambiguation). 
 
The Vampire 
 
Vampires
are mythological or folkloric beings who subsist by feeding on the life essence (generally in the form
 
of blood) of living creatures, regardless of whether they are undead or a living person.
 Although
 
vampiric entities have been recorded in many cultures,and may go back to"prehistorictimes",
 the
 
term
vampire 
was not popularized until the early 18th century, after an influx of vampire superstitioninto Western Europe from areas where vampire legends were frequent, such as the Balkans and Eastern
 
 although local variants were also known by different names, such
 
as 
 in Romania.This increased level of vampire superstition in Europe led
 
to mass hysteria and in some cases resulted in corpses actually being staked and people being accused of
 
vampirism.While even folkloric vampires of the Balkans and Eastern Europe had a wide range of appearance ranging fromnearly human to bloated rotting corpses, it was the success of John Polidori's 1819 novella 
 that
 
established the archetype of charismatic and sophisticated vampire; it is arguably the most influential vampirework of the early 19th century,
 inspiring such works as 
 and eventually 
.
The 
 
Vampire 
was itself based onLord Byron's unfinished story"Fragment of a Novel", also known as "The Burial: A
 
Fragment", published in 1819.However, it is Bram Stoker's 1897 novel 
 that is remembered as the quintessential vampire novel and
 
which provided the basis of modern vampire fiction.
Dracula 
drew on earlier mythologies of werewolves and
 
similar legendary demons and "was to voice the anxieties of an age", and the "fears oflate Victorianpatriarchy".
 The success of this book spawned a distinctive vampire genre,still popular in the
 
21st century, with books, films, video games, and television shows. The vampire is such a dominant figure inthe horror genre that literary historian Susan Sellers places the current vampire myth in the "comparative safety of nightmare fantasy".
 
Contents
[hide] 
 
travelogue titled
Travels of Three English Gentlemen 
published in the 
 in
 
1745.
 Vampires had already been discussed in German literature.
 After Austria gained control of
 
northern Serbia and Oltenia with the Treaty of Passarowitz in 1718, officials noted the local practice of
 
exhuming bodies and "killing vampires".
 These reports, prepared between 1725 and 1732, received
 
widespread publicity.
 
The English term was derived (possibly via French 
vampyre 
) from the German 
Vampir 
, in turn derived in theearly 18th century from the Serbian 
вампир/
vampir 
,
 when Arnold Paole,a purported vampire
 
in Serbia was described during the time Serbia was incorporated into the Austrian Empire. 
 
The Serbian form has parallels in virtually all Slavic languages: Bulgarian and Macedonian 
вампир
 
(
vampir 
vampir 
upír 
wąpierz 
, and (perhaps East Slavic- influenced)
upiór 
упир (
upyr 
упырь (
upyr' 
упыр (
upyr 
упирь (
upir' 
). (Note that many of these languages have also borrowed forms such as "vampir/wampir"subsequently from the West; these are distinct from the original local words for the creature.) The exactetymology is unclear.
 Among the proposed proto-Slavic forms are *
ǫ
pyr 
ь
and *
ǫ
pir 
ь
.
 Another, less
 
widespread theory, is that the Slavic languages have borrowed the word from a Turkic term for "witch" (e.g., Tatar 
ubyr 
).
 
The first recorded use of the Old Russian form Упирь (
Upir' 
) is commonly believed to be in a documentdated 6555 (1047 AD).
 It is a colophon in a manuscript of the Book of Psalms written by a priest who
 
 The

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->