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Vilas County News-Review, Nov. 16, 2011 - SECTION A

Vilas County News-Review, Nov. 16, 2011 - SECTION A

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08/10/2013

 
To DEER HUNT,Pg.2ATo RESORTS,Pg.4A
WELCOME HUNTERS!
I
Information on theuncased gun law anda list of registrationstations are featured.Pgs.8A-10A
 Hunters offered  tips in Outdoors
VOL. 126, NO. 35$1.25
Section
 A
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011
VILAS COUNTY
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EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521 (715) 479-4421 • www.vcnewsreview.com
Gun deerseason opens Saturday
 Herd on rebound following buck-only hunts
 A rebounding deer herd willmean improved harvest opportuni-ties when hunters take to northernforests for the start of the nine-daygun season this Saturday,Nov.19. After the buck harvest plummet-ed in Vilas,Oneida and Forestcounties from 2007 through 2009,the 2010 buck harvest took a sur-prisingly high jump in 2010 — up38% in Vilas County and up 34% inOneida County.Department of NaturalResources (DNR) wildlife expertsare predicting another promisingdeer season starting Saturday,especially after two straight sea-sons of buck-only hunting in sever-al units here.“We have experienced two gener-ally mild winters back-to-back,”said Mike Zeckheister,DNR North-ern District wildlife supervisor.“Inaddition,the two correspondingsprings have been favorable forfawn production.”Because eight northern Wiscon-sin deer management units arestill below goal,the DNR has madethose buck-only units again in2011.In this area,Unit 35 acrossthe northern tier of Vilas Countyand Unit 39 in Forest County willremain buck only.The only exceptions to the zeroantlerless harvest are certain dis-abled hunting permit holders andmembers of the Armed Forces.Inaddition,in a new rule this year,hunters between the ages of 10 and17 who purchased a gun deerlicense will receive an antlerlesstag for any unit in the state.With the rebounding deer herd,several units in this area have lim-ited antlerless permits available,including units 36,37 and 38.These regular quota units stillhave antlerless tags available,including 5,163 in Unit 36,1,354 inUnit 37,1,702 in Unit 38.“The 2011 deer season structurereflects the rebounding deer herd,especially in northern Wisconsin,”said Zeckheister.“We have fewerzero-quota units,more herd controlunits (in central and western Wis-
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Dragging out a nice buck is thedream of every deer hunter.Hunters hope that bucks will still berutting on opening weekend.THANK YOU —Eagle River area veterans and auxiliary memberswere honored with flowers during the Veterans Day program atNorthland Pines Middle School last Friday. See more photos insideand on page 1B. --Staff Photo By GARYRIDDERBUSCH
Three North Woods resortsWild Eagle Lodge in EagleRiver and Black Bear Lodgeand Rustic Manor Lodge,bothin St.Germain — are nowowned and managed by newfirms,according to companyofficials.The properties are nowowned by WIMI Holdings,LLC,a wholly owned sub-sidiary of River Valley Bankin Wausau,and the resortsare now being managed byIDM Group LLC.Concerning ownership,offi-cials said the two partiescame to an agreement whichsettled their obligations toeach other and transferredthe assets to River ValleyBank.There was no foreclo-sure proceedings at any timein the process,officials said.IDM Group,based in Fort Atkinson,specializes in themanagement of independentboutique hotels around theMidwest.A company officialsaid the public will see fewchanges at the resorts,espe-cially when it comes toemployees.“We believe in keepingemployees when we beginmanagement of a propertyand especially so in this case,”said Craig Neddersen,IDMGroup co-founder and presi-dent.“After all,it’s that collec-tive talent and know-how thatcontributed to such a loyal fol-lowing for these resorts and
Three resortsget new owners,management
 No interruption in serviceexpected, says firm official 
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The effectiveness of Eurasian water milfoil (EWM)control treatments on the low-er Eagle River Chain of Lakesand management options for2012 were presented to theUnified Lower Eagle RiverChain of Lakes Commission(ULERCLC) last week.The “report card”concludedthat the objectives of the pro-gram have been a huge suc-cess,according to Eddie Heathof Onterra LLC,consultantsto the commission.“When we first started in2007,there were 278 acres of EWM colonies identified,with245 colonies classified as dom-inant or greater,”Heath toldthe commission.“As of 2011,there were only 24 acres of colonies mapped and less than2.5 acres classified as domi-nant.“We had an 87% reductionand met our goal of 50%reduction and all areasdropped at least one densityrating,from 13.7% to 1.7%,”said Heath.The project to identify andcontrol milfoil over the pastfour years has been a 50-25-25public-private partnershipamong the state,local munici-palities and lakeshore proper-ty owners.Department of Nat-ural Resources (DNR) grantscovered 50% of the costs,whilemunicipalities covered 25%and private contributions cov-ered 25%.For the spring of 2012,38acres are being proposed fortreatment and no treatmentareas are proposed for Duck,Lynx,Scattering Rice or Voyageur lakes.Heath indi-cated one area they are con-
Winning the battle against AIS
 But Chain group warns ‘we can’t get too complacent’
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The Eagle River City Coun-cil decided it will not post citybuildings with signs prohibit-ing carrying concealedweapons,but will make lan-guage changes on an ordi-nance that would prohibitthrowing snowballs,stonesand other projectiles in thecity. As communities react tothe state’s new concealed car-ry law,the council last weekasked Police Chief Mark Van-der Bloomen if his recommen-dation was to post signs pro-hibiting concealed carry.Hisone-word answer was “no.”“A sign won’t stop anybodywho wants to be bad,”said Vander Bloomen.“I feel 99.9%of the people won’t be affect-ed;only the good guys get tocarry guns now.”Mayor Jeff Hyslop also saidit would simply be “false secu-rity”to put up a sign.The police chief went on todescribe his thought on thesubject.“If I had a child in a day-care center,I would like anemployee to be armed,hesaid.“We were the 49th state
City won’t post signsprohibiting weapons
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To CONCEALED,Pg.2ATo AIS,Pg.4A
 
2A
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011VILAS COUNTYNEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
NEWS
to pass this (concealed carrylaw) and not one (state) hasrepealed it.I’m not going to puta sign on the Police Depart-ment door.” A motion to abide by thestate law with a local ordi-nance but do nothing at thelocal level was adopted byunanimous vote of the council.
Throwing snowballs
The city ordinance prohibit-ing the throwing or shooting of any object,arrow,stone,snow-ball or other missile or projec-tile within the city limits wasagain discussed. Vander Bloomen explainedhe was absent from the lastmeeting when the ordinancewas discussed,but understoodquestions were raised aboutthe ordinance that includedsnowballs and other objects.Heexplained that portion of theordinance was already in exis-tence and he simply quotedwhat was in the present lan-guage.Indicating he didn’t want tosee 5-year-olds in a playgroundbreaking the ordinance,maybeit should be taken out of thelanguage.“Who will be committingthis offense?”asked VanderBloomen.“Kids.Usually drag-ging them to their moms solvesthe problem.I don’t anticipatemuch enforcement.”Hyslop said former PoliceChief Sig Hjemvick interpretedthe ordinance if the snowballwas thrown from one propertyto another.Councilman Jerry Burkettadmitted he may be guilty of  violating the present ordi-nance.“Once a week,I throw a rockat a doe eating my wife’s flow-ers,he said.“We should bringit (the ordinance) back nextmonth.” Additional language shouldinclude an exemption for cere-monies,Vander Bloomen said.This would include such thingsas military salutes when a rifleis discharged even though the“bullets”are blanks.Language changes will bereviewed at the Decembercouncil meeting.
Silver Lake Road
 A contract was approved forthe preliminary design of theSilver Lake Road upgrade withMSA Professional Services at acost of $64,000.The proposedproject will include 1,700 feetof urban roadway includingcurb,gutter,sidewalk,storm-water sewer and a bike path.The preliminary design willbe returned to the council todetermine final road width,which tentatively was going tobe 41 feet,but could be narrow-er.According to city adminis-trator Joe Laux,the city couldget a U.S.Department of Agri-culture project loan for 40years at 3% interest.“The sewer side for Highway70 West could be included inthe package and is grant eligi-ble,although the water won’tbe,Laux indicated.He said asidewalk (bike path) was addedto the project,though it’s noteligible for reimbursement. A joint meeting with thelight and water department togo over the project is planned.
Other action
In other business,the coun-cil:approved a list for theelection poll workers;heard a report from Van-der Bloomen on the success of the unused drug drop-off sys-tem at City Hall,who said 293pounds of prescriptions havebeen deposited in the latestround;andreceived a notice fromMinistry Eagle River MemorialHospital stating the ambu-lance subsidy will be $12,986in 2012,$15,583 in 2014 and$18,700 in 2015.
Concealed:
FROM PAGE 1A
VETERANS REMEMBERED — Veterans from across the NorthWoods were honored in Veterans Day services last Friday. AtEagle River, veterans attended a program at Northland Pines Mid-dle School. --Staff Photo By GARYRIDDERBUSCH
Deer hunt:
earlier opener means rut activity
FROM PAGE 1A
consin) and an increase in thenumber of available bonusantlerless tags.” Antlerless permits areavailable at $12 each for resi-dents and $20 each for non-residents at the rate of oneper day.Registration figures fromlast year show hunters took928 bucks in Vilas,up from669 in 2009,and 1,560 bucksin Oneida,up from 1,159 in2009.In Forest County,whereit is mostly public forest,hunters registered 943 buckslast year,up from 749 in 2009.The antlerless harvest wasextremely low last yearbecause no antlerless tagswere available to the generalpublic in the three counties.“All indications are that thedeer herd is on the rebound inareas where they were fewerin the past,”said Zeckmeister.“Although populations aregrowing,local conditions stilldetermine what you will seefrom your hunting spot.Deerare not evenly distributedacross the landscape.”The dismal herd andhunter complaints in 2008and 2009 prompted the DNRto decide in 2009,for the firsttime,to eliminate the oppor-tunity for gun hunters toshoot antlerless deer in unitswhere the herd was 20% ormore below goal.The buck-only hunt meant one of themost traditional deer seasonssince the 1970s.The big question this yearis if there will be trackingsnow for hunters.Snowalmost always improveshunter success as deer areeasier to see,shoot and trackin snow.It also aids hunters interms of scouting and findingthe best areas to hunt.WJFW TV-12 meteorologistMatt Serwe said snow flurriesand lake-effect snow are inthe forecast for several daysthis week,which could givehunters some tracking snow.Following 3 to 8 inches of snow last week,most of thatsnow has melted except inpine plantations and north-facing slopes.Saturday’s forecast calls fora low temperature of 27degrees and a high of 37.There is a chance of rain inthe morning,with afternoonsnow showers and windy con-ditions.The forecast for Sun-day is morning snow with falltemperatures,with a low of 23and high of 31.Zeckmeister said preseasonscouting is always importantfor deer hunters.“Deer change their habits,sometimes on an annualbasis,based on habitat,”saidZeckmeister.“For example,the area that you have huntedfor years may be on the down-ward spiral as good deer habi-tat.If this is the case,you maywant to consider a change andredirect your efforts to areasoffering better deer habitat.”Because there are severalbuck- only units here,includ-ing 35 and 39,along with 34and 29B in western VilasCounty,Zeckmeister recom-mends that hunters check thedeer hunting regulationsbooklet to make sure theyknow which unit they arehunting in and know the sea-son structure for that unit.“The more time put intoscouting,planning your huntand hunting your plan,themore you will enjoy your over-all hunting experience,saidZeckmeister.“The top priorityis always a safe hunt.”Hunters will be faced withthe third-earliest openingdate possible,so it is too soonto tell at what level ruttingactivity might still be occur-ring to boost buck movement.Biologists say once rutting isover,exhausted bucks tend todisappear into seclusion torecover.The nine-day hunt will runthrough Sunday,Nov.27,andwill be followed by a 10-daymuzzleloader season Nov.28to Dec.7 that is open to any-one with an unused carcasstag.The four-day antlerlesshunt Dec.8-11 will be open forthose hunters that haveantlerless tags in regular quo-ta units,but not the buck-onlyunits.
Uncased gun law
Gun deer hunters will havea new rule concerninguncased guns in a vehiclestarting this year.The new legislation modi-fies the state law concerningthe manner in which long-bar-reled firearms,bows andcrossbows can be transportedin motor vehicles or placed inor on stationary vehicles.The new law will be pub-lished in time to take effectthis Saturday,Nov.19,open-ing day of the 2011 nine-daygun deer season.In its essence,the new lawcan be boiled down to a singlestatement,said Tim Lawhern,DNR division of enforcementand science administrator.“Unless otherwise prohibit-ed,you can carry a long gununcased and unloaded in or ona motor vehicle in Wisconsinat any time,Lawhern said.The DNR has prepared afrequently asked questionslist on Act 51 on the lawenforcement pages of the DNRwebsite at dnr.wi.gov.While the law has changed,Lawhern said there will stillbe many people who continueto use a carrying case totransport unloaded firearmsin motor vehicles,as huntershave been and will continue tobe advised in hunter educa-tion courses.“It’s a great way to protectyour investment in yourfirearms,Lawhern said. As is always the case with anew law,Lawhern said,thefirst year is an educationalopportunity.DNR chief warden RandyStark has already providedthe state’s warden force withdetailed instructions on thenew law and its enforcement.Wardens will use a mix of enforcement,communicationand education to help huntersunderstand and comply withthe new law,Lawhern said.“We are always ready tohelp people in the field,toanswer their questions and toprovide advice,”Lawhernsaid.In another new rule in2011,youth hunters ages 10through 17 who purchase afirearm deer license will auto-matically be issued an antler-less permit that can be usedwith a gun in any deer man-agement unit statewide.Starting in 2009,Wisconsin’smentored hunting programallows 10- and 11-year-olds tohunt with an adult withinarm’s reach.
Tourism boost
While hunter numbersmight be down in northernunits compared to the gloryday of deer hunting in the1990s,DNR officials estimate40,000 hunters will still taketo the woods this Saturday in Vilas,Oneida and Forestcounties.Last year,Wisconsinhunters purchased more than607,000 gun deer licenses byopening day.Many hunterswait until that last minute topurchase their license,as theDNR reported selling morethan 89,000 licenses Fridaylast season.Many northern hunterswill come to cabins,resortsand motels in the tri-countyarea,home to massive tractsof public forestland and indus-trial forestland that harbordeer in varying densities.Public forests here includethe Chequamegon-NicoletNational Forest,the NorthernHighland-American LegionState Forest and countyforests.There are also thousands of acres of privately ownedindustrial timberlandsenrolled in forest crop man-agement that are open to pub-lic hunting.
ONE YEAR AGO
LAST YEARCOMPARISONFORESTCONDITIONS
LAST SEVEN DAYS
STREAMSAND LAKESOUTLOOK
(PORTIONS OF THE WEATHER CORNER ARE THROUGH THE COURTESY OFKEVIN BREWSTER,EAGLE RIVER and NEWSWATCH 12 METEOROLOGIST.)
Wednesday there will be light lake-effect snow, with a high of31 and a low of 24.Thursday will be a chilly morning and part-ly sunny, with a high of 28 and a low of 13.Friday should bemostly cloudy and maybe light flurries, with a high of 36 anda low of 19.The forecast for Saturday is morning rain, after-noon snow and windy, with a high of 37 and a low of 27.Sun-day expect morning snow with falling temperatures, with ahigh of 31 and a low of 23.
With water temperatures dropping into the upper 30s,anglers are still pursuing fall muskies.The approaching cis-co spawn could trigger action by the larger fish.Days precipitation recorded since Oct.1, 2011, 21 days;2010, 19 days.Average high of past 30 days, 2011, 48;2010, 50.Averagelow of past 30 days, 2011, 29;2010, 30.
HiLoPrec.
Tues., Nov.9...........5932NoneWed., Nov.10.........6035NoneThurs., Nov.11.......5239.04"RFri., Nov.12.............4424NoneSat., Nov.13...........37302"SSun., Nov.14..........3629Tr.SMon., Nov.15..........3826.8"SMost of the snow that fell last week is gone, except on north-facing slopes.The public forests will be busy this weekendwith the opening day of the gun deer season Saturday.
WEATHERCORNER
Note: 
Precipitation amounts are recorded at 8 a.m. for the previous 24 hours.
HiLoPrec.
Wed., Nov.9...........3630NoneThurs., Nov.10.......3527 3.2"SFri., Nov.11.............39181"SSat., Nov.12...........4523NoneSun., Nov.13..........4938NoneMon., Nov.14..........5023NoneTues., Nov.15.........4824NoneThe average daily high at this time last year for the next sev-en days was 35, while the average overnight low was 24.There was rain on two days measuring .07 of an inch and atrace of snow on two other days.
 
VILAS COUNTYNEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWSWEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011
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 A future comprehensiveland-use plan for the city of Eagle River that contains a“mixed-usecategory wouldprovide flexibility to propertyowners who may want a vari-ety of zoning classificationswas discussed last week by thecity’s Plan Commission. According to city adminis-trator Joe Laux,the new cate-gory would be intended to cus-tomize development,particu-larly for properties currently vacant or those that do nothave an active use.“This would give the citymaximum flexibility and couldbe intended to apply to a vari-ety of districts including com-mercial,office,entertainment,institutional,residential andplanned unit development,”Laux explained.The mixed-use category wasimmediately questioned bycommission member BillDoerr,who said that,withoutspecific language,it may not beappropriate for all parts of thecity.“I don’t think we need to goto that extent,said Doerr.“Property owners west of thefairgrounds wanted specificzoning and they haven’t comeback and wanted changes,so Idon’t think we should bringuncertainty by changing cate-gories.We just can’t throwthese districts into mixed usewithout ordinance language.Commission members KimSchaffer and Mike Dueningresponded to Doerr.Schafferpointed out that “mixed use isnot zoning,but a plan.Duen-ing said the advantage is forthe property owner as well asthe city.“It allows us the flexibility tozone those properties whensomeone comes and wants todo something,said Duening.Mayor Jeff Hyslop agreedthat a property owner in themixed-use plan “would stillhave to come to the Plan Com-mission and City Council tomake their case for a specificzoning classification under thisflexibility.”Schaffer stressed it wouldsimply be a category on a land-use map.“It has nothing to do withzoning;it allows you to pick azoning category,”she said.“Ourcomprehensive plan does notthrow out our zoning ordi-nance.”Hyslop said those areas cur-rently being used for specificactivity could be set aside fromconsideration and the focusshould be on undevelopedareas.“For bigger tracts of land,this would seem logical,”themayor said.“For large undevel-oped parcels,this wouldn’t beall that bad and remember allthe town of Lincoln land thatborders the city is zoned allpurpose.”The mayor reminded thecommission members theyhave had persons come in withan idea needing a zoningchange and were informed the“chance of any change would bezero,”but if they wanted to con-tinue the process,it was up tothem.“We have to be straight withthem and tell them the PlanCommission wouldn’t recom-mend the change,”said Hyslop.Doerr suggested languagebe placed in the comprehensiveplan that says the intent (of mixed use) is to avoid changingthe comprehensive plan whena zoning change was request-ed,but Duening said the plandoesn’t need to go that far.“Just say in the plan the fol-lowing zoning districts shall bepart of this (mixed-use) area.We’re trying to fix a problemthat doesn’t exist and probablywon’t exist,said Duening.“We’re not changing anybody’szoning;there won’t be a zoningdistrict called ‘mixed use.’“We want to make it as easyas we can to help them developthe property with as few road-blocks and still protect theirneighbors,”said Duening.
Commission seeksadditional flexibilityin land-use plan
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DONATION TO VETERANS —River Valley Bank in Eagle Riverdonated $500 to Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 8637 inEagle River last week. Bank President Nancy Schuller and her staffpresented the check to VFW Commander Tom Unti. The bankdonates $25 for each account opened at the bank by a veteran tothe local VFW post. --Staff Photo By GARYRIDDERBUSCH
The Vilas County HealthDepartment will be moved outof the courthouse and intoleased space in Eagle River,the Vilas County board decidedon a 12-7 vote at its meetinglast week.Meanwhile,the boardrejected a resolution to fill twoof four vacant HighwayDepartment positions thatwere open due to retirements,amid concerns that the wintersnowplow season is justaround the corner.While moving the HealthDepartment out of the court-house will “buy us time,coun-ty board Chairman SteveFavorite said the move stillwill not solve all the county’sspace needs.“We still have space issues,”Favorite told the board.“Thiswill give us about 2,000 squarefeet to work with.”The Health Department isbeing moved to 302 W.PineStreet,in the Eliason buildingat the intersection of highways45 and 70 in the city.The five-year lease would cost approxi-mately $2,789 a month,depending on the size of a stor-age building yet to be built.Supervisor Mary Platnersupported the move,as didSupervisor Jim Behling.“When I see mothers drag-ging two or three children intothe courthouse and up stairs tothe Health Department,weneed to make this move,saidPlatner.“We’re shuffling peoplearound to make space andwe’re about to the point of using hallways for officespace,”Behling said.“The costis quite reasonable.”But Supervisor Erv Teich-miller said it was a pre-maturemove due to not receiving theresults and recommendationsof the $60,000 consultantstudy on county employeenumbers and possible mergingor consolidating departments.“We’re making decisionswithout the consultants’ find-ings and we need to find $1.5million in cuts (to balance the2012 budget).This seems to menot to be the year to be spend-ing more money,”said Teich-miller.“My inclination is to saythis is way premature and,with today’s economy,I’m vot-ing against it.Everyone is cut-ting back and we’re spendingmore money.”That consultants’ report isexpected to be presented to theFinance Committee Nov.18,according to Favorite.
Highway workers
While the resolution to filltwo general highway workerpositions failed on a 14-5 vote,the board agreed to hire limit-ed-term employees.Previous attempts to fillfour general worker vacanciesfor the Highway Departmentwere defeated,but this timearound,the resolutionrequested to fill two of thefour.“We’re at bare minimumstaff to maintain our level of service,interim highwaycommissioner and road super-intendent Jared Maney toldthe board.“If one gets sick orinjured,we’ll be short.”He noted it comes at a timewhen winter is fast approach-ing and having enough staff iscritical.Supervisor Fred Radtkepointed out the county pro- vides winter snowplowing of town roads for the towns of Cloverland and Lincoln and“we’ll be hiring people awayfrom what private enterprisecould be doing.”Maney said it takes threeemployees to snowplow roadsin those two towns,but theyalso do other work.He saidthe highway departmentmade an $11,000 profit lastseason plowing those townroads.Favorite said limited-termemployees rather than fulltime has “not even been dis-cussed.”Behling said the only wayto do things differently is “toforce the issue on ourselves. An amendment to hire anundetermined number of lim-ited-term employees,not toexceed $39,707,was approved16-3,with Supervisor Christo-pher Mayer saying,“We needto plow the roads.”In another hiring discus-sion,the board voted 12-7 tooverride Chairman Favorite’sdecision not to allow introduc-tion of a resolution to hire afull-time law enforcementclerk due to a vacancy.The original ruling wasthat the resolution had to beintroduced by a supervisorwhose signature was on theresolution.Law EnforcementCommittee Chairman BobEgan’s name was the only sig-nature on the resolution andhe was absent from the boardmeeting. After Favorite was over-ruled,the board approved on a16-3 vote to hire one full-timedeputy sheriff due to a resig-nation.
Highway M project
 A proposal from the stateDepartment of Transportationto reconstruct 9.5 miles of Highway M from Highway 51to Boulder Junction over a six-year period was rejected on a5-14 vote of the board.The cost estimate for theproject would be $6.5 million,with an 80/20 split betweenthe state and county.Thedesign costs for the countywere estimated at $129,000.If the county agreed to thedesign phase,it would be com-mitted to its 20% cost of con-struction.Saying everyone needsroads,Highway Committeemember Charles Rayala sup-ported the project.“The intersection of 51 andM needs complete reconfigu-ration;it’s for safety reasons,”Rayala said.Favorite pointed out thecost estimate is $750,000 amile,when other roadimprovements are only$200,000 a mile.“This will be built to statehighway standards;it’s triplethe cost of a county road,”Favorite said.Maney said there were bet-ter ways the county couldspend $2 million on countyroads.Supervisor Sig Hjem- vick agreed,pointing out theeast end of Highway K is “theworst county highway in oursystem.”The contract for prelimi-nary design costs was defeat-ed,effectively ending the pro- ject at this time.
Other action
In other action,the countyboard:— adopted a resolutionhonoring Supervisor JackHarrison of Presque Isle forhis 14 years of service to thecounty.Harrison submitted aletter of resignation due tohealth concerns;— named Supervisor FredRadtke to fill the vacancy onthe Highway Committee cre-ated with Harrison’s resigna-tion;postponed until Januaryfilling the vacancy of financialmanager for the Social Ser- vices department;— approved a County-Trib-al Law Enforcement agree-ment to seek a $60,251 stategrant;— expressed displeasure onmanagement of the Chequa-megon-Nicolet National For-est and the failure to complywith harvest goals in the 2004Forest Plan;and— approved petitioning theWisconsin Department of Nat-ural Resources to withdraw40 acres from the county for-est program to trade for 23acres from the OldenburgGroup to obtain a key sectionof former railroad corridor forrecreational trail purposes.The county also would enteran additional 61 acres into thecounty forest program.
Vilas supervisors vote 12-7to move health department
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Published weekly byEagle River Publications,Inc.Eagle River,WI 54521www.vilascountynewsreview.comConsolidation of the Vilas County News,the Eagle River Review andThe Three Lakes News
Publication #659480
Member of the Wisconsin Newspaper Associationand the National Newspaper Association
Entered as periodical mail matter atthe post office,Eagle River,WI 54521,under act of March 3,1879.Subscriptionprice in Wisconsin,Vilas and Oneida coun-ties only,is $50.00 per year,all of Wiscon-sin except for Vilas and Oneida counties,$57.00 per year.Out of Wisconsin,$68.00per year.Subscription payable in advance.Published every Wednesday.POSTMASTER:Send address changes,form 3579,to Vilas County News-Review,Inc.,P.O.Box 1929,Eagle River,WI 54521,phone 715-479-4421,fax 715-479-6242.

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