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Wilamowitz-Mollendorff - Future Philology

Wilamowitz-Mollendorff - Future Philology

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Fordham University 
Future Philology! by Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff - Translated by G. Postl, B. Babich,and H. Schmid
Babette babich
 Fordham University
 , babich@fordham.edu
This Article is brought to you for free and open access by the Philosophy at DigitalResearch@Fordham. It has been accepted for inclusion in Articles,Book-Chapters, and Essays by Babette Babich by an authorized administrator of DigitalResearch@Fordham. For more information, please contactconsidine@fordham.edu.
Recommended Citation
 babich, Babette, "Future Philology! by Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff - Translated by G. Postl, B. Babich, and H. Schmid"(2000).
 Articles, Book-Chapters, and Essays by Babette Babich.
Paper 3.http://fordham.bepress.com/phil_babich/3
 
Zukunftsphilologie
is a play upon the 1861 German publication of Wagner’s ironically
i
titled “
Zukunftsmusik
” [“Music of the Future” — the quotation marks are Wagner’sown], an open letter to Frederic Villot, Conservator of the Picture Museums at theLouvre, first translated into and published in French in 1860. See L. J. Rather,
 ReadingWagner: A Study in the History of Ideas
(Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press,1998), p. 56. [
Zukunftsmusik
may already then (Grimm’s
Wörterbuch
will confirm it) havehad the perjorative connotation of ‘something built on nothing.’ — J. I. Porter.]“Condiments, vinegar, piquant seasonings, scallions, beets, highly refined sauces, leaves
ii
stuffed with brains, oregano — delicacies for a catamite compared to a good hunk of meat.” Providing an important key to the overall theme of the review as well as the his-tory of its effects, Wilamowitz’s epigraph follows August Meineke,
Comoedia Antiquae
,Vol. II:
 Fragmenta Comicorum Graecorum
(Berlin: Reimer, 1840)
 ,
Aristophanes’
ÃÅÑÁ
G
,fr.17, p. 1000. Meineke includes the following gloss emphasizing Aristophanes’judgment of Euripides’ poetry (according to Diogenes Laertius [IV. 18-19] the epigraphcorresponds to one of Aristophanes’ contests between Euripides and Aeschylus, but forthe obscene meaning of the term
 
êáôáðõãïóýíç
,
cf. Iulius Pollux,
Onomasticon
, Bk. 2,184) as so much decadent spice — stimulating depravity: “
 Dicta haec sunt in Euripidis poesin, quae ut ipse alicubi locutus est
,
êéíï
Ø
óá
 
êïñä

ò
 
ô

ò
 
•
÷éíÞôïõò
 
öñåí
ä
 í
 
 animorum motius gravissimos excitabat, itaque comparari potuit cum cibis, qui effrenatas libidines stimularent et accendaerent
.” Meineke,
Comoedia Antiquae
, Ibid. See, too, L. Seeger’s German translation:
Gewürze, Weinessig, Zwiebelknollen, Beete, Hirn, Hackfleisch, Feigenfülle, Wohlgemut, kurz
 New Nietzsche Studies
, Volume Four: Nos. 1 & 2, Summer/Fall 2000, pp. 1-33.© 2000 Nietzsche Society. ISSN 10910239.
FUTURE PHILOLOGY!
i
a replyto
FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE’S
Ordinarius Professor of Classical Philology at Basel
 „birth of tragedy
by
Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Möllendorff 
Dr. Phil.
z
Ïîùô

 
óéëöéùô

 
âáë 
ò
 
ôåýôëéïí
 
ß
ðüôñéììá
 
h
ñ
Ã
ïí
 
¦
ãêÝöáëïí
 
Ï
ñßãáíïíêáôáðõãïóýíç
 
ôá
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ô
z
 
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óô
 Â
 
ðñ
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ò
 
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ìÝãá
.
— Aristophanes,
 Age
17
ii
 
2
New Nietzsche Studies
[
 Footnote ii continued from previous page
.}
lauter Dinge, die zur Geilheit reizen!
 Aristophanes Werke
(Frankfurt am Main: LiterarischeAnstalt, 1846), Vol. 3, p. 424. Current editions include R. Kassel and C. Austin, eds.,
Poetae Comici Graeci. III 2. Aristophanes, testimonai et Fragmenta
(Berlin: Walter de Gruyter,1984) and F. W. Hall and W. M. Geldert, eds.,
 Aristophanis Comoediae
(Oxford: OxfordUniversity Press, 1954 [1901]), fr.130, which follows the 1869 Dindorf edition. For thescato-erotically satiric expression,
 
êáôáðõãïóýíç
,
 Jeffrey Henderson in
The Maculate Muse: Obscene Language in Attic Comedy
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991), offersthe surprisingly standard (given the author’s happy break with tradition by translatingGreek terms into Anglo-Saxon rather than Latin correspondent terms) and ultimatelyinsufficiently exact — where allusion is the vehicle and barb of the epigraph —periphrasis “pathic depravity” [
êáôáðõãïóýíç
is defined as “brutal lust” in the Liddelland Scott lexicon]. Even James Davidson (in an otherwise unprecedented and usefulcritique of the term in an extended section included in a study illuminating thebackground context of the epigraph as a whole) stops short of a translation although andspecifically summarizing Aristophanes’ epigraph as a “spendid piece of metaphor mixing,compar[ing] Euripides’ tragedies to dishes overdressed with spices and condiments, ‘allthis is
 katapugosune
,’ he says, ‘compared to a real piece of meat.’” Davidson,
Courtesans and Fishcakes: The Consuming Passions of Classical Athens
(Harper: New York, 1999), p.168, and, further, pp. 167-182. Nietzsche provides ample material for such an‘Aristophanic’ feast in BT 11, and the tone of Wilamowitz’s epigraph echoes in itsrhetorical associations with passivity or effeminacy (see Wilamowitz, pp. 17-18 below;cf. Davidson, pp. 172-173). By means of such barbed aristophanic color, Wilamowitz,seemingly on Euripides’ behalf, meant to install Nietzsche in a place worse than thatreserved for Euripides/Socrates in Nietzsche’s
Birth of Tragedy
. See too thecorrespondence between Nietzsche and Rohde. Rohde objected to Nietzsche’scommunication of Overbeck’s proposal of “
 Afterphilologie
” as a possible title for the replyRohde was composing on Nietzsche’s behalf in response to Wilamowitz as excessively
 aristophanesque
” [letter from Rohde, 27 July 1872], but ultimately accepted Overbeck’ssuggested title. Discussions of 
 Afterphilologie
are not in short supply and may be foundin nearly any commentary on the public aftermath of Nietzsche’s
Birth of Tragedy
..
.. how suddenly the desert of our exhausted culture, just described insuch gloomy terms, is changed when it is touched by the Dionysianmagic! A tempest seizes everything that has outlived itself, every-thing that is decayed, broken, and withered, and whirling, shroudsit in a cloud of red dust [red?] to carry it into the air like a vulture[how is this?]. Confused, our eyes look after what has disappeared;for what they see has been raised as from a depression into goldenlight, so full and green, so amply alive, immeasurable and full of yearning.Tragedy is seated amid this excess of life, suffering, andpleasure, in sublime ecstasy, listening to a distant melancholy song[who is singing?] that tells of the mothers of being whose names are:Delusion, Will, Woe
Yes, my friends, believe with me inDionysian life and the rebirth of tragedy. The age of the Socratic manis over; [This strange species of man is also called theoretical man,critic, optimist, non-mystic
all those are quite horrifying things.

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