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The wait for Justice : CHR Report Final Nov 17

The wait for Justice : CHR Report Final Nov 17

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Published by Sri Lanka Guardian
(November 17m Colombo, Sri Lanka Guardian) The end of 30 years of war provides a unique opportunity to the Sri Lankan Civil society to look back and ascertain the past mistakes.

However the Sri Lankan civil society has little space to generate alternative policies against
the existing ones of the state. It has been further aggravated following the war due to
the triumphant mentality of the majority and the victorious mindset of the rulers. This is
not a new feature and it is commonly existent in many a post war situation. Nevertheless,
Center for Human Rights believes that it is our bounden duty as a civil society organization to avert reoccurrence of conflict and address the causes that lead to ethnopolitical violence.
for more details: www.srilankaguardian.org
(November 17m Colombo, Sri Lanka Guardian) The end of 30 years of war provides a unique opportunity to the Sri Lankan Civil society to look back and ascertain the past mistakes.

However the Sri Lankan civil society has little space to generate alternative policies against
the existing ones of the state. It has been further aggravated following the war due to
the triumphant mentality of the majority and the victorious mindset of the rulers. This is
not a new feature and it is commonly existent in many a post war situation. Nevertheless,
Center for Human Rights believes that it is our bounden duty as a civil society organization to avert reoccurrence of conflict and address the causes that lead to ethnopolitical violence.
for more details: www.srilankaguardian.org

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Published by: Sri Lanka Guardian on Nov 17, 2011
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06/26/2012

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THE WAIT FOR JUSTICE
 1
 
THE WAIT FOR
JUSTICE
Critical analysis of Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission
Center for Human RightsCHR-Sri Lanka
 
2
THE WAIT FOR JUSTICE
 
The Center for Human Rights- SriLanka was established in 2010 in abid to address the growing humanrights concerns in the country andto educate the people about issueswhich have been neglected by themain stream media or civil societygroups for various reasons.In the past two years we have stud-ied, spoken about and publishedgreatly on Freedom of Information,Academic Freedom of Universitiesand the Lessons Learnt and Recon-ciliation Commission.We were the only independent civilsociety who observed the LLRC’soutstation sessions consistentlyand its reports on these sessionshave been widely quoted by bothlocal and foreign media. From thebeginning the LLRC has respondedpositively to CHR’s reports and rec-ommendations and we have beeninstrumental in introducing severalmechanisms ensuring the safety of those coming to give evidence andassuring transparency.
Published in November, 2011Center for Human Rights100/19AWelikadawatta RoadRajagiriya, Sri Lanka0114-341514fax:0112866224
©
CHR- Sri Lanka 2011
All rights reserved.This publication iscopyright, but may bereproduced for purposesof advocacy with prior permission from thepublisher.Inquiries, please contact
rajith_tennakoon@yahoo.com
Images © CHR Sri Lanka
chrsrilanka.com
Written byVositha WijenayakeRathindra KuruwitaEdited byRajith Keerthi TennakoonSurangi Ariyawansha
 
THE WAIT FOR JUSTICE
 3The end of 30 years of war provides a uniqueopportunity to the Sri Lankan Civil society tolook back and ascertain the past mistakes.However the Sri Lankan civil society has littlespace to generate alternative policies againstthe existing ones of the state. It has beenfurther aggravated following the war due tothe triumphant mentality of the majority andthe victorious mindset of the rulers. This isnot a new feature and it is commonly existentin many a post war situation. Nevertheless,Center for Human Rights believes thatit is our bounden duty as a civil society
organization to avert reoccurrence of conict
and address the causes that lead to ethno-political violence.Therefore, through the existing LLRC processit is the duty of civil society organizations,to explore and lobby to reframe the path of reconciliation efforts by the government alongthe lines of true political, psycho-social andvictim perpetrator reconciliation.We believe the current process is not
sufcient to understand the depths of theethno-political conict of Sri Lanka andits past, or the current post war–conict
situation. In addition the LLRC process and
its objectives cannot be deemed as sufcient
to understand the true reconciliation means:political, psycho-social and victim-perpetrator aspects of reconciliation.Therefore, there is the need to generate anew action program and a strategy to makereconciliation, in order to reach a viablealternative future in Sri Lanka.Moreover any alternative efforts that areaimed at the creation and sustenance of reconciliation and polices need to enhancethe mandate of the receiving testimonies.There exists also the need for the LLRCcommissioners to whom the submissions
are made to be of impartiality, non-conict of 
interest, and also be representatives of ethnicharmony and be politically balance.Thus it is indispensable that he processis equipped with experts who have multi-disciplinary knowledge, skills and correctattitudes to resolve data gaps between
conicting perceptions and resolving
perceptions. The strategy we propose is touse the existing LLRC process to resolve thisexisting data gap.In the conversion of testimonies into lessonslearnt, the adoption of modern narrativetechniques combined with expert knowledgeguided by correct terms of references forman asset. In this sense what is needed is a
correct working denition for reconciliation
that is deem worthy as suitable for theconditions pertaining in Sri Lanka.Furthermore, the lessons learnt need beevolved into policies without perpetualstagnation as results that emanated fromformer commissions of inquiry.On an additional observation of the process itis visible that there is a lack of participation or involvement of masses in the process. Therehas also existed a persistent lacuna of mediaactivism for the implementation of a processthat is communicated to the grassroot level of Sri Lankan society.CHR, Sri Lanka through this report and itsactive observation of the LLRC processstrives to rectify the problems that be notedsince the inception of the LLRC. Thus the
report is a reection of those observations
and thoughts for improvement in a processthat needs to be experiences leading tolessons learnt, which in turn will lead toimplementation of practical and productivepolicies for reaching reconciliation in the SriLankan society.
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