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RODULF CARNAP
RODULF CARNAP

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THE LIBRARY OF LIVING PHILOSOPHERS VOLUME XI
THE PHI LOSOPHY OF RUDOLF
CARNAP
EDITED BY PAUL ARTHUR SCHILPP NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
LA SALLE, ILLINOIS \u2022 OPEN COURT \u2022 ESTABLISHED 1887
-v-
THE PHILOSOPHY OF RUDOLF CARNAP
Open Court Publishing Company is a division of Carus Publishing
Company.
Copyright \u00a9 1963 by The Library of Living Philosophers, Inc.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored
in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the
prior written permission of the publisher, Open Court Publishing Company,
315 Fifth Street, P.O. Box 300, Peru, Illinois 61354-0300.

First printing 1963 Second (first paperback) printing 1991 Third printing
1997
Printed and bound in the United States of America.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Schilpp, Paul Arthur, 1897-ed.
The philosophy of Rudolf Carnap. [ 1st ed] LaSalle,
Ill., Open Court [ 1963]
xvi, 1088 p. facsim., port. 25cm. (The Library of living philosophers, v.

11)
"Bibliography of the writings of Rudolph Carnap, compiled by Arthur L.

Benson": P. [1015]-1070.
1. Carnap, Rudolf, 1891- I. Title. (Series)
B945.C16453 193 62-9577

*
GENERAL I NTRODUCTI ON
Library of Congress [5]
The Library of Living Philosophers is published under the sponsorship of
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.
-vi-
TO
" THE LI BRARY OF LI VI NG
PHI LOSOPHERS"

According to the late F. C. S. Schiller, the greatest obstacle to fruitful
discussion in philosophy is "the curious etiquette which apparently taboos
the asking of questions about a philosopher's meaning while he is alive."
The "interminable controversies which fill the histories of philosophy," he
goes on to say, "could have been ended at once by asking the living
philosophers a few searching questions."

The confident optimism of this last remark undoubtedly goes too far.
Living thinkers have often been asked "a few searching questions," but
their answers have not stopped "interminable controversies" about their
real meaning. It is none the less true that there would be far greater
clarity of understanding than is now often the case, if more such searching
questions had been directed to great thinkers while they were still alive.

This, at any rate, is the basic thought behind the present undertaking. The
volumes of The Library of Living Philosophers can in no sense take the
place of the major writings of great and original thinkers. Students who
would know the philosophies of such men as John Dewey, George
Santayana, Alfred North Whitehead, G. E. Moore, Bertrand Russell, Ernst
Cassirer, Karl Jaspers, Rudolf Carnap, Martin Buber, et al., will still need to
read the writings of these men. There is no substitute for first-hand
contact with the original thought of the philosopher himself. Least of all
does thisLibrary pretend to be such a substitute. TheLibrary in fact will
spare neither effort nor expense in offering to the student the best
possible guide to the published writings of a given thinker. We shall
attempt to meet this aim by providing at the end of each volume in our
series a complete bibliography of the published work of the philosopher in
question. Nor should one overlook the fact that the essays in each volume
cannot but finally lead to this same goal. The interpretative and critical
discussions of the various phases of a great thinker's work and, most of
all, the reply of the thinker himself, are bound to lead the reader to the
works of the philosopher himself.