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A Brave New (Connected) World

A Brave New (Connected) World

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Published by: PipelinePublishing on Nov 17, 2011
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© 2011, All informaon contained herein is the sole property of Pipeline Publishing, LLC. Pipeline Publishing LLC reserves all rights and privileges regarding the use of this informaon. Anyunauthorized use, such as distribung, copying, modifying, or reprinng, is not permied. This document is not intended for reproducon or distribuon outside of 
.To obtain permission to reproduce or distribute this document contact
 for informaon about Reprint Services.
A Brave New (Connected)World
By Jesse CrydermanAs we stand on the cusp of an all-IP world, it’s hard toimagine a world without the internet or a land beforemobile. The ammable combination of Web 1.0 with the launch of the mobile era set off a communicationsnetwork big bang that has literally changed the worldin 20 years. Much like the universe itself, globalcommunication networks are expanding rapidly; sofast that IP addresses ran out this year, necessitating achange to IPv6. Astronomy students can bicker aboutwhether the fabric of space itself is expanding at 71 or74 km per second per megaparsec, but the speed of global network growth is fairly certain.According to Melanie Posey, Research Vice Presidentat IDC, “The worldwide base of consumer broadbandsubscribers will expand from 485 million in 2010 to 666million in 2014, and consumer mobile data connectionswill jump from 2.1 million to 3.84 million during the same timeframe...Internet trafc, on a worldwide basis, is set togrow from a daily average of 168 petabytes to nearly 794petabytes in 2014...”If framing the scope of network growth in terms of petabytes doesn’t work for you, this might: by 2015 thefollowing will occur:470% growth in global internet trafc; the equivalentof 204,100,000 people streaming Internet HD videosimultaneously, all day, every day.Global IP trafc will be equivalent to 28 million DVDsdownloaded per hour.Mobile data will experience a 26-fold increase.Globally, there will be 15 billion networked devices,up from 7 billion in 2010.To keep up with this explosion, carriers will ramp upaverage broadband speeds by about 300-500%, andmobile broadband in 2015 will match current xedline speeds. As Sandvine Executive Marie Fiala Timlinsummarized, “Undoubtedly there will continue to be
Volume 8, Issue 3
 
© 2011, All informaon contained herein is the sole property of Pipeline Publishing, LLC. Pipeline Publishing LLC reserves all rights and privileges regarding the use of this informaon. Anyunauthorized use, such as distribung, copying, modifying, or reprinng, is not permied. This document is not intended for reproducon or distribuon outside of 
www.pipelinepub.com
.To obtain permission to reproduce or distribute this document contact
sales@pipelinepub.com
for informaon about Reprint Services.
demand for more Internet coverage, at higher speeds,as applications continue to evolve and consumers gethooked on the “Internet anytime anywhere” lifestyle.”All of this presents some major challenges for CSPs.As Carlos Rodriguez, Manager of Regulatory Affairsat Telefónica USA pointed out, telcos need to makechanges to keep revenue ahead of costs. “Costs growas trafc across the networks grows, but revenues havebeen stagnating,” Rodriguez said, via the Cisco virtualforum in June. “If not changed, we may face a periodwhere rms are simply unable to invest in improving network infrastructure due to a lack of funding.”While the challenges are enormous, they are certainlynot insurmountable, and standing ready on the sidelinesare myriad OSS solutions that can ensure the globalcommunications networks can continue expanding likeour universe, and not a supernova.
Crucial Functions
As service providers stretch to deliver more servicesacross greater geographical footprints, the OSS is acritical determinant. Not only can it standardize ordering,provisioning, and assurance, but it also can revealextremely valuable subscriber data. It also is the lynchpin that connects the multiple technologies and systemsinherent to a global network.Specically, crucial OSS functions that support globalnetwork expansion include, “discovery and multi layerand technology support like CORE/FTTx access/Layer 2VPNs etc., across vendors and with a strong set of APIsfor interfacing with other OSS systems,” says AnandVenkat, Director of Global Solutions, APAC, at Telcordia.Marie Fiala Timlin, an executive at Sandvine, connectedwith Pipeline to discuss the importance of OSS regarding subscriber metrics:“Carriers are recognizing that their Operations SupportSystems are treasure troves of information regarding subscriber behavior. In the past, networking equipmentwas only needed to make the network run and effectively troubleshoot connectivity issues. Now, due to the rapidadoption of new devices (e.g. tablets, gaming consoles)and increase in demand for video and real-timeapplications, networks are experiencing a large strainon their capacity. Carriers need to be one step ahead of subscriber demand, in order to maintain and grow a loyalcustomer base. That is only possible by understanding subscriber behavior and usage patterns, and this type of data is readily obtained from OSS, such as inline policycontrol devices.”Michael Kearns, CEO of Amartus, sees the OSS asa key factor in the ability to enable partnering andservice catalog growth. The OSS will also gain increasedrelevancy with cloud services, which will introduce a newlayer to the equation.“Going global is all about partnering, few serviceproviders have the means to build their own globalnetworks,” said Kearn. “Service Providers and NetworkOperators have an opportunity to differentiate and createnew service revenue streams as both buyer and seller of ‘service reach’. The OSS is an important determinant in their ability to deliver and consume these services. Mostof today’s OSSs were designed to deliver on-net servicesand lack the support required to actively manageor provide off-net services. The goal from a servicesperspective, should be to treat on-net and off-netservices in the same way. This means to order, provision,and assure the service regardless of whether it is on yournetwork or partners.”“Furthermore, the rapid growth in cloud-based servicesis driving demand for dynamic end to end servicefulllment that goes beyond the traditional network asa service to incorporate the ICT components in a singleservice,” Kearns continued. “Cloud services introduce awhole new dimension for the OSS beyond the boundariesof the network.”
Tall Hurdles
Service providers around the world are preparing for the transition from legacy TDM and ATM technologies to all-IP/packet networks. They are simultaneouslyimplementing plans to erase the seams betweenmultiple partners and services, which will become more
For global expansion, OSSis a key factor in the abilityto enable multi-providerpartnering and servicecatalog growth and delivery.

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