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Logic Assignment 2

Logic Assignment 2

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SUAREZJASPER G.LOGIC 003
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10:30AM TTHASSIGNMENT 2
 
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ST. THOMAS AQUINAS
Thomas was a theologian and aScholasticphilosopher. However, he neverconsidered himself a philosopher, and criticized philosophers, whom he saw as pagans,for always "falling short of the true and proper wisdom to be found in Christianrevelation". With this in mind, Thomas did have respect for Aristotle, so much so that inthe
Summa 
, he often cites Aristotle simply as "the Philosopher." Much of his work bearsupon philosophical topics, and in this sense may be characterized as philosophical.Thomas's philosophical thought has exerted enormous influence on subsequentChristian theology, especially that of the Roman Catholic Church, extending to Westernphilosophy in general. Thomas stands as a vehicle and modifier ofAristotelianismandNeoplatonism. 
Commentaries on Aristotle
Thomas wrote several important commentaries on Aristotle, includingOn theSoul, Nicomachean EthicsandMetaphysics.His work is associated withWilliam of Moerbeke'stranslations of Aristotle fromGreekintoLatin. 
Epistemology
Thomas believed "that for the knowledge of any truth whatsoever man needsdivine help, that the intellect may be moved by God to its act." However, he believedthat human beings have the natural capacity to know many things without specialdivinerevelation,even though such revelation occurs from time to time, "especially in regard tosuch (truths) as pertain to faith."
Revelation
Thomas believed that truth is known through reason (natural revelation) and faith(supernatural revelation).
Supernatural 
revelation has its origin in the inspiration of theHoly Spirit and is made available through the teaching of the prophets, summed up inHoly Scripture, and transmitted by theMagisterium,the sum of which is called"Tradition".
Natural 
revelation is the truth available to all people through their humannature; certain truths all men can attain from correct human reasoning. For example, hefelt this applied to rational ways to know the existence of God.
 
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Though one may deduce the existence of God and his Attributes (One, Truth,Good, Power, Knowledge) through reason, certain specifics may be known only throughspecial revelation (such as the Trinity). In Thomas's view, special revelation isequivalent to the revelation of God inJesus Christ.The major theological componentsof Christianity, such as theTrinityand theIncarnation,are revealed in the teachings of the Church and theScripturesand may not otherwise be deduced.Supernatural revelation (faith) and natural revelation (reason) are complementary ratherthan contradictory in nature, for they pertain to the same unity: truth.
Creation
As a Catholic, Thomas believed that God is the "maker of heaven and earth, ofall that is visible and invisible." Like Aristotle, Thomas posited that life could form fromnon-living material or plant life, a theory of ongoingabiogenesisknown asspontaneous generation: Since the generation of one thing is the corruption of another, it was notincompatible with the first formation of things, that from the corruption of the less perfectthe more perfect should be generated. Hence animals generated from the corruption ofinanimate things, or of plants, may have been generated then.Additionally, Thomas consideredEmpedocles'theory that various mutatedspeciesemerged at the dawn of Creation. Thomas reasoned that these species weregenerated throughmutationsin animalsperm,and argued that they were not unintended bynature;rather, such species were simply not intended for perpetualexistence. This discussion is found in his commentary onAristotle's Physics: The same thing is true of those substances which Empedocles said were
produced at the beginning of the world, such as the ‗ox
-
progeny‘, i.e., half ox and half 
man. For if such things were not able to arrive at some end and final state of nature sothat they would be preserved in existence, this was not because nature did not intendthis [a final state], but because they were not capable of being preserved. For they werenot generated according to nature, but by the corruption of some natural principle, as it

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