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The LaSallian (August 2005)

The LaSallian (August 2005)

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PHOTO BY ERIC SIY
ROYCE ROBERT ZUÑIGA
A
mid the growing clamor for impeachment from differentsectors across the Philippines, DLSU is still firm in itsstand that the best way to resolve the problems that besetthe country today is for President Gloria Macapagal-Ar-royo (GMA) to “voluntarily relinquish her post.”"I think it will only be a matter of time before the nation gath-ers enough courage to tell her the naked truth. People’s patiencedefinitely will not last five years. The mood will shift from a callto voluntary resignation to ouster," DLSU System President Br. Armin Luistro stated.DLSU is considered the first educational institution to makea bold and strong stand on GMA's resignation through an openletter released by Lasallian Brothers entitled,
Restoring Faith inDemocracy 
last July 3. Media also reported that DLSU's move isan uprise of the Middle Forces, a class that triggered the dethrone-ment of Erap Estrada. Wit this, the Administration formed an ad hoc committee onnational affairs to mobilize the different sectors to participate inthe politcal discussions. Series of prayer rallies, educational lectures,and other activities were being conducted by the committee.However, some alumni and faculty were not supporting theBorther's stand. These responses were also published in nationaldailies in the past weeks.
SONA Aftermath
Together with the District for Justice and Peace, DLSU or-ganized a round table discussion in La Salle Greenhills last July 29. Dubbed as
Let the Ligh Shine: Towards a Consensus on the National Crisis 
, the discussion highlighted the aftermath of GMA'sState of the Nation Address (SONA).Present in the conference were House of RepresentativesMinority Floor Leader Francis Escudero and Party List Congress-man Teddy Casiño, who both represented the opposition. CabinetSecretaries Ricardo Saludo and Rigoberto Tiglao, on the otherhand, spoke for the GMA Government. Also present in the conference were members of partylist Labanng Masa, historian Manolo Quezon III, Akbayan RepresentativeEtta Rosales, and Running Priest Fr. Robert Reyes among oth-ers.DLSU-System schools also attended the forum.
Resignation or Impeachment?
The conference was put in order so that various segments of the country can come up with a consensus regarding the best way to resolve current issues that hound the president. According to DLSU Student Council (SC) President Army Padilla, who was one of the student reactors in the conference,DLSU will never change its stand on the issue.Nevertheless, when she was asked about impeachment, she saidthat in the discussion, it was agreed that, “impeachment is just ameans to solve the problem and not the end.”The participants of the conference reached a consensus that callsfor the resignation should continue; but if the president decidesto stay in office, impeachment should be the recourse to solve theensuing political crisis. When asked about the alternative of the opposition if and whenthe impeachment complaint that they filed in the Lower Houseof Congress would not prosper, Congressman Escudero said thatthey would only allow it to happen “if it would be based on meritand not on technicalities.”Escudero furthered that calls for Charter Change are untimely 
The fight continues
THE FIGHT, SEE PAGE 15
LaSallian
The
VOL. XLVI NO. 3
THE OFFICIAL STUDENT PUBLICATION OF DE LA SALLE UNIVERSITY
4 AUGUST 2005
 
Prof charged withsexual harassment
10 male students file formal complaint
PAULO JOSE MUTUC
T
he “Can I hug you as a friend?”case has turned into a University dilemma.Ten students filed a sexual harass-ment against Enrico Baluyut, a part-time faculty member of the Account-ancy Department.Engineering College Assembly President Dan Dizon took the respon-sibility of compiling the complaints,since nine of the 10 complainants werefrom the College of Engineering. Thetenth complaint came from the Collegeof Science.The complaint will be handled by the Committee on Decorum and In- vestigation, headed by Vice Presidentfor Academics and Research Dr. JuliusMaridable as chairman. The student,faculty, employee, and Administrationsectors are represented in the com-mittee.
He’s the one!
In the July issue of 
The LaSallian
,four students pinpointed the suspect tobe a University employee. The newsreport said that the suspect introducedhimself as Eric and strangely tried tobefriend students. Normally done inrest rooms and isolated places, the sus-pect would ask to hug the student “asa friend.” Victims stated they encoun-tered Eric in restrooms at Yuchengco,Mutien Marie, and Miguel Buildings.However, it turned out to be a caseof mistaken identity.Last July 27, a certain employeefrom College of Business and Econom-ics tipped Student Council President Army Padilla that a more “primary”suspect is the part-time faculty mem-ber. The employee also heard reportsthat the faculty had been awkwardly approaching students as early as lastterm. The earliest student complaint ascompiled by Dizon was May 2004.Upon learning of the develop-ments, Dizon obtained the pictureof Baluyut in the DLSU website andshowed his picture to the students.The complainants positively confirmedBaluyut to be the one who harassedthem.Baluyut has been teaching account-ing subjects since 1997. He served as afull-time professor from 1998 to 2001,and later on chose to teach on a part-time basis. In fact, some employees saidhe has been
CSI-like investigation
Dizon observed that all complaintsfollowed a pattern. Routinely introduc-ing himself as Eric, the worst incidentaccording to a complaint happenedon July 18 at 7:30 am, when Baluyuttried to get inside the cubicle a student was in. He followed up his exploits by using his default “Can I hug you as afriend?” on the engineering major. Thishappened in the rest room of the 3
rd
 floor of Yuchengco Building.The claim was corroborated by a Closed Circuit Television (CCTV)feeds (The times are approximate). The video verified that Baluyut indeed wentto the 3
rd
floor of Yuchengco Building,entered the rest room at 7:25 am and went out to the drinking fountain at7:28 am. He hesitantly entered the restroom again at 7:29 and exit at 7:30 am, walking along the hallway. The studentexited the rest room at 7:38 am.Baluyut teaches only one subjectthis term, ACCOM2B, an MWF8:10-9:10 class at LS318. However,another student claimed that Baluyutapproached him at around 9:30 pm onJuly 20, a Wednesday. According to his testimony, Bal-uyut asked to tour the University withhim. The student hesitantly obliged,but as he sensed that they were walkingtowards the dark corners of Br. ConnonHall, made an excuse and hurriedly  went away.The latter incident was also con-firmed by two CCTV feeds. Baluyut was seen in the La Salle Building CCTV entering the Accountancy Departmentat around 8 in the morning. He wasseen at around 9:25 pm in the ConnonHall CCTV along with the student victim.Dionisio Escarez, director of theSafety and Security Office (SSO), saidthat the CCTV videos could serve ascircumstantial evidence that Baluyutindeed had been in those two placesat the time the victims claimed. It may be recalled that 32 CCTV cameras were installed and operational early this term.In fact, the SSO also monitoredthe suspect to determine if he is stilldoing his awkward motives in theUniversity. Although 10 students only filed acomplaint against Baluyut,
The La-Sallian
confirmed at least 20 studentsencountered the faculty with the sameapproaches. In fact, three students ap-proached the publication and claimedthat the part-time faculty also ap-proached them. 
Entrapment
The SSO has been planning entrap-ment operations to catch the allegedharasser in the act.Entrapment serves to support stu-dent claims, Escarez said. As early as July 22, an additionalundercover guard has been assigned totrack the activities of the faculty in theUniversity. The male guard was specifi-cally chosen to look like a student.The guard “encountered” Baluyuton August 1. At approximately 8:35am, Baluyut went out of his class andsaw the guard outside.Baluyut used his routine “Can I hug you as a friend?” line on the guard. Theguard brought to Baluyut the fact thatthey were in the LS building hallway,so they went to the staircase. ThereBaluyut hugged him. The entrapmentdid not materialize since Baluyut im-mediately entered his class.However, the operation will con-tinue this week.
Report incidents
Since the incident is already a Uni- versity dilemma, Dizon encouragedstudents to report all cases of harass-ment to any SC officer. The StudentHandbook strongly denounces in thisact, as it is explicitly written in themanual.Students should not be afraid be-cause the SC will keep the cases strictly confidential, Dizon said.The SC is also planning to intensify its education campaign against sexualharassment in the University. The ad-ministration will also do so.
DONELLE GAN
In Review
Harassmenot!
The recent sexual harassment case filed by 10 male students brings the Anti Sexual Harassment Act of 1995 into the limelight. The student body should be armed with knowledge of the act to discourage further instancesof harassment
Harassment 101
Republic Act No. 7877, also known as
Anti-Sexual Harassment Act of 1995,is a law that declares sexual harassment unlawful in the employment, educationor training environment, and for other purposes.RA7877 led to the formation of a Committee on Decorum and Investiga-tion, the principal function of which is to conduct meetings and orientationswith the University community to increase awareness of sexual harassment as penalized by law.Additionally, the Committee should “take steps to prevent incidents of sexualharassment,” and “conduct investigations of violations of the Anti-Sexual Harass-ment Act of 1995,” as stated in the Student Handbook. It has jurisdiction over all sectors of the University.Sub-committees are formed to address individual sexual harassment cases.Under the law, several types of sexual harassment offenses are prohibited.They include but are not limited to physical assault of a sexual nature such asrape, molestation, or touching the victim’s body.Unwanted sexual advances which include commenting on a person’s sexual-ity “made in the presence of the complainant who indicates… that such conductin his or her presence is unwelcome.” These are not exhaustive and other casescould be considered sexual harassment as well.
The law requires the University to take immediate action regarding Sec-tion 5 of RA 7877, which stated that the University “
shall be solidarily liablefor damages arising from the acts of 
 
sexual harassment” if inaction is taken.
Legal process
 According to the Appendix L of Student Handbook, a formal complaintshould be written by the victims under oath to be filed with the chair of thecommittee. The complaint should contain the name of the person or personsaccused and a factual narration of the case. According to 4.1.2 of Appendix L, “respondent shall be required toanswer the complainant in writing, under oath within three days from receiptof the complaint.” If the respondent failed to comply within the set days,this means admission of the case.Parents and guardians shall also be sent a copy of Notice of Hearing, if the victims are students.
Blast from the past
There are already reported incidents of sexual harassment cases in theUniversity. Suspects of harassments include administrator, faculty members,and a student.On August 15 of 2002, two male guards filed a sexual harassment com-plaint against Enrico Cordero, assistant vice president for Campus Develop-ment. The guards came from Combined Blue Dragon Security and ServicesInc (CBDSSI). During the investigation, the guards were redeployed toother establishments.But Cordero was acquitted, since no sufficient evidence can prove theguard’s claims. The guards discontinued the formal complaint, and CBDSSIended its 24-year service with the University last June 30. Right8 Agency Inc. is now serving as DLSU’s guard agency.In September 2003, a male student was also found guilty of sexualharassment case. The student made untoward advances to several ladies inthe library. Although the females had difficulty filing the case, the complaintpushed through. After four months, the student was found guilty and wasput on probation until he graduated.In 2004, a CBE student filed a sexual harassment complaint against afaculty from Management of Financial Institution.From these reported harassments, the latest incident involving a part-timefaculty member is the most celebrated case since it involves 10 complainantsand has been going on for at least a year.If the part time faculty is proven guilty, the Committee would imposesanctions such as severe reprimand; suspension without pay, with prejudiceto subsequent promotion, reclassification and permanency; dismissal fromthe University upon clearance from the Department of Labor and Employ-ment.
Go back to the poor,Brother Visitor exhorts
“We need to go back to our roots and reaffirm our com-mitment to educate the poor.” This was what Br. EdmundoFernandez FSC, Brother Visitor, told the Lasallian commu-nity in his July 16 pastoral letter to the DLSU community.He echoed the same thought in his speech at the WorldCongress V held last June 18.
Servant of the Poor
Br. Edmundo advocated for the change of public per-ception that La Salle schools are elitist and inaccessible tothe poor. He explained that despite many existing projectsdirectly serving the poor, there still exists a dichotomy inthe public eye that pits the so-called rich schools againstthe poor schools. “We need to address this dichotomy by presenting an image that we are one La Salle and that in whatever situation we find ourselves, we have a common vision for educating the Filipino youth,” Br. Edmundo saidin his World Congress Speech.In line with the Lasallian Mission of being of service toGod and country, the 16
th
District School will open in Juneof 2006. The Jaime Hilario Integrated School in Bagac,Bataan is the first poor school that the District will officially open after almost half a century. Ambassador Carlos Valdesdonated the land the school will stand on. Tuition fee foran entire school year would cost Php500.The Brother believed that an “excellent educational pro-gram for the poor—based on sound pedagogy, an updatedcurriculum, and sound values (including love of country)—isalso the salvation of our country.”
Divided, we cannot stand
Br. Edmundo appealed for unity amongst Lasallian In-stitutions. He tackled issues hindering the pushing throughof the Lasallian Mission in 15 District schools comprisingthe Federation of Lasallian Institutions (FLI). In the currentLasallian Educational Model, there are 11 district schools inLuzon, 2 in the Visayas and 2 in Mindanao from Canlubang,Pampanga to Misamis Occidental offering all levels of educa-tion from pre-school to post graduate studies. The FLI hasbecome a venue for coordinating and organizing Districtactivities, which benefited the individual schools.Despite the advantages of the establishment of the FLI,Br. Edmundo pointed out limitations in the existing LasallianEducational Model. The synergy of Lasallian schools missesout on important opportunities, inefficiencies and overlapssince the current structure has neither the capability northe personnel to push mutually beneficial and collaborativeactivities consistently and regularly. “With the current way  we do things, we end up spending our energy attending toomany meetings when in fact the issues and concerns that wetackle overlap,” Br. Edmundo articulated.He also singled out the FLI’s lack of venues for collec-tive learning to take place. “The rich experiences we have inrunning our individual schools should lead us to learn fromeach other’s mistakes as well as successes.” “As such, we tendto repeat our mistakes and/or spend a lot of time, energy and money reinventing what we have already perfected inanother situation,” he adds. The public perception of divi-sion and disunity has formed because of the autonomy of the district schools and the highly decentralized form of governance among schools.
Quality education
In line with these limitations, Br. Edmundo proposedmoving towards a new and unified Lasallian EducationalModel with a more focused implementation of the Lasallian
KRISTEL GAYLE GUZMAN
DLSU targets world-class
L
evel up. Three years after attain-ing the Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleg-es and Universities’ (PAASCU)highest ranking at Level IV, De LaSalle University-Manila (DLSU-M)is now taking a closer look at possibleinternational accreditation options inefforts to be recognized by its foreigncounterparts.Towards this goal, Dr. CarmelitaQuebengco, Executive Vice President,attended talks in Vietnam from July 27to 30 with other ASEAN universitiesregarding Quality Assurance (QA)evaluation by an external agency.
Quality assurance
Quality assurance in higher edu-cation, according to Professor GrantHarnan in a Bangkok QA conferenceearlier in 2000, is “systematic man-agement and assessment proceduresadopted by higher education institu-tions and systems in order to monitorperformance against objectives, andensure achievement of quality outputsand quality improvements.” ASEAN University Network (AUN) undertakes QA to develop andharmonize overall teaching, research,and overall academic standards of member universities. Regular work-shops on QA have been conductedsince November 2000, when the idea was formally conceived by the AUN.DLSU had been part of many rank-ings before. Now-defunct news maga-zine
 Asiaweek 
ranked DLSU-M 71stamong multidisciplinary universities inthe Asia-Pacific region. Domestically,the Commission on Higher Education(CHED) identified within DLSU-M10 Centers of Excellence and fiveCenters of Development. And merely a few months ago, an alleged study by CHED based on board examinationpassing rates from 1992 to 2001 putDLSU-M on the near bottom of its listat 16th among 20.The Administration previously planned subjecting the College of Engineering (COE) for evaluation tothe United States-based AccreditationBoard for Engineering and Technol-ogy (ABET) This failed to materializethough; as ABET would at best grantCOE only a guarantee of “substantialequivalency” or certification of compa-rable educational outcomes with thoseof ABET-accredited programs.Mechanical Engineering Depart-ment Chair Dr. Manuel Belino, who was assigned to attend an ABETmeeting at Malaysia in 2003, addedthat the process would also have beentoo expensive for the University topursue.“In any case, we are still searchingfor an international assessment thatfits our present needs and will help uschallenge ourselves to excel beyond where we are now,” said DLSU SystemPresident Br. Armin Luistro FSC.
The research factor
The London Times Higher Educa-tion Supplement in November 2004ranked the World’s Top 200 Universi-ties. Prominent Asian universities fromJapan, India, Hong Kong and Chinamade it to the prestigious list, whileDLSU-M was conspicuously absent.Some indicators used included faculty,number of graduate students, admis-sions, and financial aid. Dr. Bernardoobserved the heavy importance placedon research in the criteria. He furthernoted that the criteria are free from cul-tural bias and economic prosperity.However, all is seemingly not lostfor the Philippines’ premier universi-ties, as the World University Rank-ings articulated that the Philippinesis “home to universities that may dobetter in years to come.”Research universities such as theMassachusetts Institute of Technol-ogy are continuous sources of break-throughs in a diverse number of fields,and more so, are highly regardedinstitutions globally. The University has long been aware of this, hence theexistence of different research centersacross the six Colleges and the Uni- versity Research Coordination Office(URCO).In line with this, URCO Chair Dr.Luis Razon revealed the establishmentof a first-ever departmental researchproductivity award in August based on journal papers and books published, as well as creative works by the faculty.However, he admitted that, “it [theaward] is still a very early exercise todetermine which one is the most pro-ductive department. A large department might haveplenty of publications compared toa small one but on a per capita basis[the smaller department might bemore productive].” Dr. Razon in turnemphasized that “We look towardsresearch as a goal in itself, to makethe university better; not for us to say that we are better than anyone else.Ultimately any research will make theuniversity better.”Dr. Bernardo presented that for2003, DLSU-M placed second inresearch with 17, next only to theUP System with 178. However, 178researches are just roughly the out-put of one department of the top 20universities.
Restraints and restrictions
Then again, several barriers im-pede the progress of DLSU research.“Money is a big part… The faculty, ineffect, restrict themselves because of budget limitations but make do with what is available,” Dr. Razon stated.The URCO is presently lobbying fora 20 percent share of the University budget. Aside from financial resources,former Vice President for Academicsand Research and present University Fellow Dr. Allan Bernardo also identi-fied other difficulties in the University’squest for international recognition viaresearch during the De La Salle Alumni Association’s Fifth World Congressearlier this year.Dr. Bernardo identified the absenceof a “critical mass of faculty expertise”,the incompatibility of teaching andresearch workloads, nonexistent full-time graduate students, and someUniversity policies as obstacles. And then there are concerns withregard to teaching being compro-mised for the sake of research. Thisapprehension, however, is unfoundedaccording to Dr. Razon, who said,“research will enhance the material[taught].” This will ultimately reflectin the improvement of undergraduatetheses, he added.Student Council President Army Padilla approved of the push for“world-class” status through researchas well, since DLSU “should add tothe world pool of knowledge.” In view of the goal of assisting in poverty alleviation, the research drive shouldbe met with proper budget allocationand reduction of unnecessary expenses,she expressed.
Br. Armin dreams of"melting-pot" University
 Accessibility of Lasallian education on the nationwide level. This is the ra-tionale behind DLSU-Manila’s vision of having one in five students as fullscholars by 2011.In a meeting with the Council of Editors (CoEd) last June 22, DLSUSystem President Br. Armin Luistro FSC revealed that the
20% by 2011
driveis beyond giving scholarships to poor students, but changing the culture of DLSU-Manila. Br. Armin envisions DLSU as an academic ground for Filipinosof different races – thus, producing a “melting pot” university.“It is not [just a matter] of bringing the (DLSU) tuition fee down, butalso changing the very population of the campus to reflect the Philippines,”Br. Armin told the CoEd.Since a rare number of ethnic minorities study in the University, Br. Armindreams to see Aetas, Muslims, and other indigenous tribes studying in theUniversity. “It would be good to see Muslims with veils and Aetas wearingtheir tribal costumes. We can (even) interact with these exciting groups,” Br. Armin said.Br. Armin, however, clari-fied that his vision doesn’tcontradict DLSU’s line“Christian achievers for Godand Country.” Taking it froman ecumenical viewpoint, the“Christian” in the phraseshould not limit other cul-tures and faiths from studyingin DLSU. (Br. Armin usu-ally uses the phrase “Lasal-lian Achievers for God andCountry” as not to confusethe concerned parties).
 A global perspective
Since DLSU is already inthe process of applying for
PAUL DARWYNN GARILAO
Math Circle holds first ever Math Camp
For the four Saturdays of July, the De La Salle University Mathematics Circle played host to over 270 promising young high school students in the first ever Math Camp.One eight-hour session was held each Saturday. Around 65 schools throughout Metro Manila wereinvited to participate in the event with each school beingallowed to send a maximum of 12 students. The campaimed to promote the excellence of the BS-Mathematicsprogram, the College of Science and DLSU as a whole.Through lectures and hands-on activities, the organizers were able to interact with the students and introduce themto the different tracks offered by the program, which havespecializations in computers, statistics, and business. Thecamp was made possible through the combined efforts of the student organizers and the professors who facilitatedin the technical aspects of the lectures.The Mathematics Circle hopes to encourage the attend-ing high school students to eventually take up the BS-Mathprogram or at least relay to their peers the opportunitiesoffered by the course. A registration fee of Php600 wascharged for each participant to cover expenses and doubleas a fundraiser for the organization. Mathematics CirclePresident Philip Andrada believed that the event was a greatsuccess in promoting the quality of La Sallian education.
RAYMUND CHRISTOPHER CUESICO
 ARTWORK BYIAN ROMAN
Strong evidences.
Dan Dizon filed the testimonies of complainants, who claimed that they were "harassed" by the part-timefaculty. He also obtained video clips of CCTV footages, which will serve as circumstantial evidences.
PHOTO BYCHRISTOPHERKISON
Reaching the skies.
De LaSalle University is continuously upgrading not only itsfacilties but also educational programs towards the goal of achieving global status.
PHOTO BYLUISDE VERA
DONELLE GAN
BR. ARMIN, SEE PAGE 9GO BACK, SEE PAGE 15
4 August 20053
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The LaSallian
 
Paul Darwynn GarilaoJose Paolo LacdaoLuis Emmanuel De VeraDonelle GanJuan Carlos ChavezEarlene Clarissa ChingJan Michael JaudianEric SiyAlejandro Almendras IVKristel Kaye Chua
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4 AUGUST 2005
The LaSallian
 
has its editorial office at 502 Bro. Gabriel Connon Hall, De La SalleUniversity, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004. TLS can be contacted through telephonenumber 5244611 loc. 701, or through its e-mail address, the_lasallian@yahoo.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity or space. None of the contentsof this publication may be reprinted without the express written permission of theEditorial Board.
U
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Joyce Anne Alfonso, Felice Ann Cariaso, Ross Vergel Delantar,Kristel Gayle Guzman, Arvin Alcanar Jo, Michelline Kuon, Paulo JoseMutuc, Royce Robert Zuñiga
M
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Nancy Chua, Joseph Marc de Veyra, Franz Francisco Chan,Rosanna Guintivano, Angeline Martha Manuel, Anne Lorraine Ng, MarianeLourdes Perez, Anjeli Pessumal, Karess Rubrico, Dianne Margareth Tang,Nicole Tangco
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PORTS
Evelyn Chua, John de los Santos, Ivan Geoffrey Gayares, JhoannaKay Leal, Camille Bianca Pinto, Don Eric Sta. Rosa, Reuben Ezra Terrado,Candace Daphne Ting, Nikki Ann Mariel Tungol, Jewelynn Gay Zareno
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Patrick Joy Abanilla, Carvin Choa, Richard RustumGutierrez, Frank Herrera, Kenji Inukai, Kimberly Kha, Gene Carlo Magtoto,Christine Marie Mendoza, Rommel Mendoza, John Ian Roman, GerardPhilip So Chan, Charmaine Ventura
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Maria Michaela Ferrer, Ernestine Suzanne Teves,Meryll Anne Yan, Isabelle Regina Yujuico
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Rosanna Luz Valerio, Joel Orellana
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Fritzie Ian Paz-De Vera
LaSallian
The
The bastion of issue-oriented critical thinking.
 
"Eric" used his powerfor self-gratification,while exploiting youth's vigor and innocence.There is a fine linebetween need andwant.
Needs, emotions, and XSocial stigma
Such a measure is pro-active, but is meddlingreally necessary?I think it would bebetter if the qualifier“without failure in ANY term” be changed to“without failure in thePREVIOUS term”.
What is the REAL state of the nation?We welcome your
 
perspectives
:the_lasallian@yahoo.com
There's no conspiracy
B
ased on feedback we receivedlast issue, the article “Students‘harassed’ by a University employee”has erupted like a nuclear bombbecause of its malevolent content.News reports about DLSU’scall for President Arroyo’s voluntary resignation was even surpassed by thistabloid-type article, as it has vibrantly called the attention of the community.Perhaps, the students are already oversaturated with national politics andfound a more satirical relief in thearticle, because it directly concerns thecommunity.In reality, the “Can I hug you asa friend” issue is already a University social stigma, which seems to threatenthe whole community. Student rightshave been hampered because of theperson’s unusual movement in theUniversity.In my three years stay in theUniversity, the usual sexual harassmentcases I encountered only involved one victim. Yet in this incident, a lot of students have voiced their concerns,including 10 victims who filed acomplaint against the person. All complainants were fingerpointing a part-time faculty. Yes, thefaculty, who is supposed to moldChristian achievers, is the one whomodifies Christian values in a way that would benefit his personaldesires. A faculty who loves to use thename "Eric". (Yes, a part-time CBEfaculty and not any other Eric in theUniversity).I personally encountered Ericone exhausting evening. Surprisingly,he sat beside me near South Gateand asked if we could walk aroundthe University. The encounter is notnormal. I followed him to validatethe testimonies of students whom heapproached before. What alarmed me is that he wantedto direct me to the backstairs of SPSBuilding, a claustrophobic placerarely habituated by people. And so Idiverted his attention as I immediately left the building…Enough with thenightmare.***But what’s with the name Eric? According to babynames.com, Eric isa Scandinavian name that means “everpowerful”. In many glaring ways, Erichas used his power to follow studentsin rest rooms, to approach themunnaturally, or ask for a friendly hugfrom them.Eric’s Operation Hugging iscategorized as a sexual harassmentcase not just because of physicalattraction or sexual advances, butalso about power. As Dr. Esanislao,a guidance counselor, mentioned inlast issue’s news article, “wherein hedevelops a tendency to use his poweron people lower in level and youngerthan him.” Eric utilized his power forhis self-gratification, while exploitingthe youth’s vigor and innocence.Our society could find it difficultto accept Eric. For a strange guy,approaching male students withhuggable arms, is indeed a bizarrein a society that is rarely habituatedby male-male relationships. What iscommon in this society are femalestudents, holding hands and embracingeach other. As Dr. Esanislao explained it best, women are more emotional thanmen. That is why it is strange to seemen becoming “more concern” withtheir fellow genders. Not to mentionthat it is more alarming to see a menbefriending in rest rooms.***Let us try to decipher the operativephrases Eric used in his routine to catchboys in town. In sociology, this isknown as ethnomethodology, whichsimply means the study of the waysin which people make sense of theirsocial world.“Can I hug you as a friend?” is themost common statement of Eric thatall his victim knows. But read betweenthe lines. Why would Eric include thephrase, “as a friend”? Playing safe?This seems to be a preemptivestrike to claim that he would justembrace students with brotherly careand not with malicious intentions.However, such phrase is more freakingthan the usual “Can I hug you”,because he could defend that the actis just a brotherly love.Talking about semantics, the verb“can” is not the appropriate term touse in his famous line.
Can 
means“the ability to do something”, theability to hug someone. Of course,everyone can hug, (except the armlessbeings). Rather, the right term is “May I hug you as a friend?” that pertains toasking permission to bodily embracesomeone.Maybe, Eric wants to emphasizehis ABILITY to hug, because heexpects he would not be permitted todo so. Again, this is power tripping.Eric mostly communicates inrest rooms, where students withdraw their impurities. Imagine a guy in restroom would ask your name, course,and mobile number. Is rest rooman appropriate place and time forsocials? Another interesting note is that we never heard complaints from CBEstudents. Almost all the complainantsare engineering students. This is Eric’sbest strategy. If he would victimizestudents from CBE, students wouldeasily scold him to proper authorities.How come that he is still in theUniversity late at night, while hisclasses are in the morning? Maybe,doing a research about books andboys. Yet, every male in the University can be a victim of Eric. In fact, hegives himself even into the entrapmentoperations of security team.Indeed, it is illogical for Ericto justify that he is performing hisOperation Hugging out of love. Iremember reading a comic about Alberto Rivera, who revealed the“wicked” acts of Roman Catholicism.Dr. Rivera became a Jesuit priest andlater on was excommunicated by theChurch because of his exposes. While he was sleeping in adormitory for Jesuit missionaries, Alberto was suddenly grabbed andrepeatedly kissed by a priest. As anormal reaction, he threw a punchagainst the priest. The day after, theprincipal explained that the Father is just showing a “brotherly love” to the young boy.This is a great twist of Christianity’sdefinition of love. In reality, brotherly love emanates from the depths of compassion, respect, and concern.Jesus told us to “love one anothermore than yourself”, but not beyondlust of flesh and power.In some way or another, the verbaland non-verbal approaches of Eric aresubtle forms of sexual harassments. Callhis ways as severe sexual behaviors.I don’t want to dig Eric’s morepersonal and intimate character.He is old enough to know that what he’s doing is unacceptable andunlawful, though he would disagreethat his motives are morally right. Afterall, his worldview is full of fantasies.Since now he is under trial, may thelaw rule fair and just. How harsh itmay seem, Eric must be sanctioned with greater penalties.Sexual harassment is indeed amajor social problem faced by thecommunity, especially an educationaltraining ground.But if students and the rest confrontthis problem with confidence, we would be able to protect student rightsas well as the rights of others. A colorful election and at least 22padded resumes later, it is finally timefor our frosh student leaders to work.But what should be expected? I’m noprophet, but this I believe will holdtrue nonetheless: a leadership that willfocus on students’ want rather thanneed will achieve nothing but inheritthe wind.I use my favorite analogy, religion.(As early as now, think from the studentperspective – Who is the leader? Whoare the followers?) Jesus was the bestleader who ever walked around planet.But neither he was popular nor rich.Being a carpenter’s son and living asimple life, one should wonder how He managed to completely convincetwelve believers to give up everythingand follow Him and much later,millions of people as well.Simple: Jesus addressed a need thatno one else could address, and that isspiritual peace. The disciples may have wanted money, power or fame – Jesushad none of these – but Jesus piercedthese superficial whims. Jesus offeredthe disciples what they needed, not what they wanted. It is not necessary that the disciples knew what they needed, it is enough that He knew.People naturally flock around aleader who offers what they need.There is no hype, just a simple desire.There is a fine line between needand want. The world’s economy relieson it. Does one really need an iPod?Does one need to buy a Lacoste shirtover an exact shirt sans only the brandname? Does one need a pimped-upride a la Xzibit when the money couldbe given to NGOs?Governance that addresses only  want is no different from entertainment,even without media coverage orLupita Kashiwahara. Is this probably the reason why actors could ascendto high governmental posts? Thestudent version is only a more innocentmirror. What do our freshman studentsneed? Need is always very hard todistinguish, but I believe that needcould be realized when you filter outthe wants, the same way that politicalparties filter out aspiring candidates.The filtering process is extremely tedious, it involves an observanteye. It requires thinking: it shouldkeep leaders lost in thought whenothers should be relaxing their minds.It involves receiving criticisms andreacting constructively (unless youbelieve you’re perfect) It involvestaking fire for your constituents. Itinvolves unexpected circumstances. Itinvolves time. Indeed, leading is morethan managing.I bet GMA’s political survival,our fledgling leaders must’ve thoughtof that. That’s why they seemed soenergetic during the campaign.* * *It turned out that the initial suspectin the issue we had when we were working on our July issue (that wedid a follow-up on this month) turnedout to be wrong. I think this israther normal, as police investigatorsnormally have many suspects whichthey eliminate one by one.The whole process of investigationseems pretty much a pseudo-Josephusproblem to me, only this time there isno formula to solve it.My apology to Roderick Salita of Office of University Registrar for it hadbeen made clear to me the article hadmade such a negative impact on him.That “Eric” was not him. It hadnever been him.* * *It is quite saddening how innocencecould easily be drowned by utters of dubious nature. It could be a beaconof light piercing the darkness, and yetnow it seems to be utterly useless.Only three possible scenarios fit:the light is insufficiently bright, thedarkness eats up the light, or the lightis hidden under the table and not onthe lamppost.* * * As I write this, the real “Eric” isstill frolicking. I confirmed that he stillused the name Eric at least once. Malesneed to be alert.* * *My mother likes reading romancepocketbooks and watching romanticmovies. In one particular instance, Ihad nothing to do and seeing the book lying around, I thought of skimmingthrough it. These books and moviescould be full of very cheesy lines.Snippets of the infinite list would go:I won’t be able live my life normally if  you do this to me… I have not slept well after you left me…It is very interesting why people fromall walks of life resort to emotions to gettheir point through. This is a best researchtopic for our Psychology majors.* * *Professor X did it again. If X hadread my last column, some changesshould have been effected. MaybeX’s so psyched up. X hadn’t read,and so X reruns X’s students throughX’s seemingly orchestrated debacle.X has been flaunting X’s inefficiency efficiently.There is a reason why X is calledX. X is the 24
th
letter of the alphabet.If you add the order (in the alphabet)of the first letters of X’s first and lastname(s) together you will get 24.* * *Correct me if I am wrong, but Ithink the fire espoused by the DLSUcommunity regarding the Gloriacontroversy is getting weaker.Like a piece of firewood that hasbeen exhausted, it will turn to ash andbe blown away by the wind. Will welet this happen to us?
T
he Lasallian Schools PressConference, a gathering of campus publication units within theDLSU System, has allowed me to getto know various other publicationsand Lasallian editors. While theevent, last held in February, hasn’treally taken off, we’ve been ableto meet and share stories with oneanother.One particularly interestingstory that I’ve been following overthe last few months concerns thecreation of an oversight office for campus publications in DLSU-Dasmariñas(DLSU-D). That new Student Publications Office (SPO) has been patternedsomewhat after the SPO units here in DLSU-Manila and DLSU-College of St. Benilde.It’s noteworthy because Heraldo Filipino, which is DLSU-D’s officialstudent publication, has been running as a semi-autonomous unit underDLSU-D’s Dean of Student Affairs for the longest time. How such a unit would receive the formation of an umbrella office for publications wasinteresting to watch, especially given that the publication has been openly critical of various events and policies that have shaped the campus.* * *“Student publications shall enjoy the right to freely and responsibly publish articles, opinions, and other published works, guided by the CampusJournalism Act of 1991 (RA 7079) and the University Mission Statement, without any undue influence or threat.” (DLSU-Manila Student Handbook 2003-06, section 15.11.1)Such a principle guides the campus publications here in DLSU-Manilaand gives them freedom to determine the content that will come out intheir respective issues, subject to the standards of professional and ethical journalism. It also explicitly states the independence of publications editorsin their work.I would have to assume that such a principle also guides Heraldo Filipino, whose nature is similar to that of The LaSallian. But when DLSU-D’s SPOcame out with its own guidelines for all recognized in-campus studentpublications, that basic freedom has been put under threat. Allow me to utilizethe rest of this space in defending a sister publication against something thatcould become a precedent for many other dangerous things.Having read the document in its entirety, allow me to state that theguidelines are very poorly formed. It doesn’t cover several matters that itshould touch on, and many of the things it covers are those that shouldn’tbe covered by the DLSU-D SPO. What particularly bothers me is the DLSU-D SPO’s perceived need to“objectively screen, assess, and evaluate” all student publications. I understandthe intention of improving the quality of output produced by Heraldo Filipinoand other publications within DLSU-D. Such a measure is pro-active, but isthis form of meddling really necessary?The new guidelines reflect a poor understanding of how major campuspublications work. Many of us hold ourselves to high journalistic standards. We understand our responsibilities in the content we come out with and takemeasures to minimize mistakes. We can’t be error-free, but we know that wehave a responsibility to make sure that we are as right as possible. This objectivescreening indicates that the SPO (or the administration, for that matter) puts very little trust in the publications’ ability to regulate themselves.Given that, it also encroaches on tasks that should be performed by the Editorial Board of each publication. The guidelines devote pages onterminologies concerning proper English and ethical journalism that content will (supposedly) be evaluated during the objective screening, even thoughsuch things should be within the domain of the editors of publications. An external screeing also opens a can of worms as far as publicationsare concerned. There is no assurance that only technical mistakes will becorrected. There is a real danger that certain sensitive articles may be subjectto evaluation, and worse, be sanitized. The document makes mention of every student publication requiring an approval before final printing, and this only serves to raise suspicions over the entire process. Such guidelines might serveto take away the freedom that Heraldo Filipino enjoys under the law. I do notassume that the office wants to censor the publication, but rather I would liketo illustrate how the document could prove to be a double-edged sword.The guidelines also border on unethical behavior in journalism. Nearly all publications make it an editorial policy not to show articles to any externalparties prior to release, in order to maintain its credibility and professionalism.Such is true here at The LaSallian, where even the SPO Director is not allowedaccess to our articles before printing. This serves to protect the publication’sright to freely determine the content that it will release. However, thedocument disregards this ethical behavior just to make sure that there will be“fewer” mistakes. I do not believe that such a compromise just for control.I’ve also come to notice that there seems to be no indication that HeraldoFilipino was consulted in the formation of this document. As the party that would be most affected, its editors’ thoughts should have considered before theformation of these rules instead of simply making it a bitter pill to swallow.Every campus publication is a breeding ground for developing critical,creative, and responsible thinkers. As such, every publication should be giventhe freedom to achieve such potential. This kind of a document only servesto promote the notion that adults do not trust the youth to be responsibleenough to act properly. It’s pathetic to see that such backward thinkingcontinues to thrive in our society.Publications make mistakes and articles sometimes receive added attention,but I don’t think that damage control is enough of a justification to pro-actively pursue certain measures. The SPO is better off concentrating itsefforts in helping the publications in their other operational responsibilitiesand enhancing journalists’ knowledge. Such would already be a huge steptowards preventing unwanted events from taking place. There should bemechanisms for assessment and evaluation, but these should be done afterrelease and not before. Allow the publications the freedom to grow and trustthat they will deliver on their responsibilities.I understand that the office is still in its infancy stages, and as such, many things still have to be threshed out. Every sector has a concern that it wouldlike to raise, and a discussion before anything else should occur. Impulsivedecisions such as this document would only serve to generate distrust betweenthe student publications and the new overseeing office. y ose aoo acao
(edited)B
efore you curse our enrolmentsystem, consider first the enrolmentsystem of other schools. Read thisfirst:During a reunion with my highschool friends, one of them shared hisenrolment experience in the University of the Philippines. He said that it washard to enroll because you have to wait for hours and endure the heatof the sun. So far, the most detailedaccount of enrolment horrors camefrom my best friend from the Ateneo, who is a member of their registrationcommittee. As far as I can recall, thelast thing that he shared about theirenrolment system was when they triedusing a program that would help themenlist the students to different courseofferings or subjects. Unfortunately,they had trouble using it due toconflicting program versions (somecomputers were using an older version)and that caused a terrible delay anda lot of irritated students and parents.Now, think about it. If we stillpractice a manual enrolment system, wouldn’t you wish that there is aneasier, faster way to enroll without thehassle of lining up and feeling that youhave wasted a quarter of your life for asubject that you would only fail at theend of the following term?Honestly, I think that our enrolmentsystem is far better than the system of other schools. In fact, ours could bethe best enrolment system a school inthis country could have.However, despite the comfort of enrolling online, there are still students who continue to abhor the system,especially the policy that within it. Apparently, most of these students arethose with at least one failing subject, who finds enrolment as anotherhopeless subject hunting activity.If you are currently subscribedto the registrar’s yahoogroups (dlsu-
 With the investigation on the new sexual harassment case finally reaching aconclusion, a threat to the University can finally be removed and justice served.However, there are still questions left to be answered following this whole mess.There are still sectors who question whether CCTV cameras should be installedinside the campus, but there is no denying that they were instrumental in helpingto solve this case. Security on campus, another item that has been questioned inthe past, can never be definitely guaranteed as well, especially if the threat comesfrom inside the community.The questions lie in how the conflict reached the attention of properauthorities.Last month, this publication published an initial report regarding the “Can Ihug you as a friend?” case based on the tips of a few victims of the professor. It setoff a series of events that culminated in the determination of the culprit.This publication’s initial investigations attributed the sexual harassment casesto a University employee. Such coverage allowed the Student Council (SC) and Administration to investigate the matter further, until it was determined that it was a part-time professor and not an employee who was behindthe complaints of the students. What ticked off the administration was that the students coursed their grievancesthrough this publication and not through the proper channels. For this publicationto report on what it deemed as a matter of urgency is one thing, but on a deepernote such an event reflects a poor grievance system in the University.It is clear that the grievance procedure would’ve been the proper channel giventhis scenario. However, the students that initially came out were afraid of goingthrough the process. Understandably, they feared making this complaint withoutbeing given much protection. Such only goes to prove that there is still distrust of the Discipline Office and the SC, both key players in the grievance process.Students are afraid to come forward with complaints, and little has been doneto make them comfortable enough with the grievance process.It shouldn’t be the case that students come out with their complaints throughthe publications instead of the proper channels. But unless something is doneto remove students’ fear in the grievance process, this cycle will never cease toend.The SC has much to do in making the grievance process more viable forstudents. The proposed centralized Grievance (refer to page 15) is a great ideafor it does not limit complaints on faculty alone but also on other University sectors. The challenge now is to show that the SC can protect students’ welfarethroughout the process and not simply file the complaints for them. It should bemore pro-active rather than reactive in hearing out the concerns of students.For their part, the Administration should be more encouraging when studentsraise valid concerns regarding different aspects of University life. May the grievanceprocedure of both SC and Administration go beyond ceremonial ways.The recent harassment case is just a part of the bigger picture. There aredefinitely other suspicious activities happening in the University that studentsknow about.But most, if not all, still feel that it’s not worth their time to bring them up.
announce@yahoogroups.com), or you are receiving emails from friendly schoolmates, notifying the studentbody about the upcoming onlineenrolment, then you might have readthe phrase “students without ANY failure (academic and non-academic)in ANY term”. It is very clear fromthis statement that the students,regardless of the type of subject they failed, will have to be labeled as a“regular enrollee”. Unfortunately,these “regular enrollees” are obviously the ones who are at the end of the foodchain. They scavenge on the subjectsleft for them.The worse thing about this qualifieris that some “regular enrollees” areaverage students who failed becauseof incompetent teachers not worth ourtuition fee. Assuming that the studentstudied hard and came prepared inclass, it would be very unfair to thestudent if incompetent teacher flunkedhim. It is apparent that for the averagestudent, it would be beyond his powerto survive the class without the helpof a competent teacher. And it wouldeven be more unfair if the studentis denied forever in his stay in thisUniversity of his freedom to choosethe best subjects with the best teachersat the best time, which is of course,during online enrolment.On the technical side of onlineenrolment, I have learned that oursystem could not take in a largenumber of students or else it couldcrash. It is the reason why duringonline enrolment, the internet andintranet (a connection in an area likeaccessing the my.lasalle account inDLSU’s computer labs) connectionbecomes slower. I think that it couldalso be the same reason why ourenrolment is divided into colleges andrank (i.e. advanced, priority, etc.) indifferent days. But, what if suddenly,majority of students had at least onefailure, do you think that the system won’t crash knowing that they couldenroll all at the time? Aside from the probability of system breakdown, there are alsoother technical considerations likethe program to be used for scanningstudent records to verify failing subjectsand manpower. However, I think thatthese are things that DLSU can easily handle.Modesty aside, my record is stillclean of failed subjects, but I think it would be better if the qualifier“without failure in ANY term” bechanged to “without failure in thePREVIOUS term”. If the school cancome up with a new online scheme, which is the online adjustment, why can’t it alter an existing computerprogram that could benefit the averagestudent?I believe that changing the qualifiercould do justice to the average student. And that would stop some of them(and me) from thinking that this onlineenrolment with its qualifier is somekind of conspiracy to milk money fromstudents with failure in any term.
The Aftermath
EDITORIAL
 
4 August 200544 August 20055
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