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Pythagoras Plato and the Golen Ratio

Pythagoras Plato and the Golen Ratio

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Published by: HiramSecret on Nov 21, 2011
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06/20/2012

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Pythagoras, Plato andPythagoras, Plato andPythagoras, Plato andPythagoras, Plato andthethethethe Golden RatioGolden RatioGolden RatioGolden Ratio
The Golden Ratio and the Pentagram in the philosophy of the Pythagoreans The Golden Ratio and the Pentagram in the philosophy of the Pythagoreans The Golden Ratio and the Pentagram in the philosophy of the Pythagoreans The Golden Ratio and the Pentagram in the philosophy of the Pythagoreans 
By: Ken L. WheelerBy: Ken L. WheelerBy: Ken L. WheelerBy: Ken L. Wheeler
 
Pythagoras, Plato andPythagoras, Plato andPythagoras, Plato andPythagoras, Plato andthethethethe Golden RatioGolden RatioGolden RatioGolden Ratio
The Golden Ratio and the Pentagram in the philosophy of the Pythagoreans The Golden Ratio and the Pentagram in the philosophy of the Pythagoreans The Golden Ratio and the Pentagram in the philosophy of the Pythagoreans The Golden Ratio and the Pentagram in the philosophy of the Pythagoreans 
Author: Ken L. Wheeler
1
st
Edition 2005
All Rights Reserved. Copyright © Oct. 2005 DARKSTAR PUBLICATIONSPrinted on acid free paper for archiaval purposes.
No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying,recording, taping or by any information storage or retrieval system,without the permission in writing from Darkstar Publications 
For information, please contact: Darkstar Publications, 533 Plainview Rd.,Lexington, Ky 40517
Published by Darkstar PublicationsPublished by Darkstar PublicationsPublished by Darkstar PublicationsPublished by Darkstar Publications
ISBN 0-9712541-5-X
$15.00 U.S. Printed in the United States of America
 
Introduction
“The Pythagorean Philolaus says that the sun is a vitrescent body which receives the light reflected by the fire of the Cosmos, andsends it back to us, after having filtered them, light and heat; so that you might say that there are two suns, the body of the fire whichis in the heaven, and the igneous light which emanates there from, and reflects itself in a kind of a mirror. Perhaps we might consideras a third light that which, from the mirror in which it reflects, and falls back on us in dispersed rays.”
[FRAGMENTS OFPHILOLAUS From Boeckh 14. (Stob.Ecl.l:25:3:p.530)]
Pythagoras, Plato, and Plotinus after them were well aware, by their intense study of geometry and nature, the Golden section. Thepurpose of this very small but pithy book is to examine some key passages of Plato and the Phi incommensurability of thePythagorean pentagram and unveil a heretofore unknown ‘secret’ rediscovered which links the Golden ratio, Pythagoras, theontological preeminence of the pentagram, and the two most important passages in the Republic of Plato all together. I will show thatthe Emanationist philosophy/religion of the Platonists employed the Golden ratio into both a “Divided Line” analogy and the “Cave”symbolism to show the variant degrees of proportion and ratio between the visible (aisthetos) and intelligible (noetos) kosmos in adivine Logos (proportion) of which the Monad is Arche. Also I hope to demonstrate that the “Pythagorean oath”, the tetraktys wasshown only inside a special ‘Pythagorean triangle’, the 1-1-Phi triangle which is not only the “triple intertwined triangle” of thepentagram, but also the 1-1-Phi-1/Phi analogy of Plato’s Cave and Divided line symbolism for the totality of all things.The Logos (proportion) which comprises the visible and intelligible, I hope to show, formed the foundational doctrine of thePythagoreans and Platonists who despised all who were “ignorant of geometry” to partake of their instruction, for “As above, sobelow”, the Platonists before and after understood the “third thing which unified” was a Logos of the Monad, geometrically andarithmetically represented by a power of Phi, which itself is the logos of the necessary emanation of the Monad.Phi is the ratio and relationship of the Monad to its increasingly phenomenal self-image in emanation. “But employing the objectsof which the shadows below are resemblances in their turn as images”
[Rep. 509];
thru the many ages of nature study the Pythagoreansunderstood that all nature exhibits a Logos (proportion) to a Principle (1), and this very special ratio was Phi (1 to 1.618033), and sobeing the case, the 2
nd
and 3
rd
Hypostases (the Nous and the Psyche tou pantos [world soul]), though noetic, MUST exhibit this sameproportion. After who knows how long a time, the symbolism and analogies I mention below will spell out that which theEmanationists settled upon as the visible models for their knowledge of the ordered kosmos into powers and or proportions of Phi.One very special triangle, its significance uncovered for the first time here in this book, serves as the model for the tetraktys, thepentagram, the Divided line, and the Cave analogies, and its geometers contain the seven sections of Platonic totality. The 1-1-Phi‘Pythagorean triangle’, the 108-36-36 degrees isosceles triangle. At no time does this book affiliate its discussion with thebastardization of the pentagram in meaning and usage, or the theology of numbers with those groups as commonly denoted in thepractice of the white-lighter new-age movement, but only to the root meaning and importance as taught by the Pythagoreans alone, of which the author is certain, is the only point of relevance or importance.That the Pythagoreans and Platonists were obsessive in mind and possessed by talk and models of harmony and proportions aspertains the noetic and visible kosmos is in no doubt, but what is of utmost importance is that Phi comprised the most important“oaths/secrets” of the Pythagoreans and which is the basis of the 5
th
Platonic solid which “represented the kosmos”. Phi is theubiquitous logos of the principle to things create in which the mind finds beauty in its ratio and which the entire kosmos is painted in.We know now that even DNA has a ratio of its width to full circle revolution of 1:Phi, as well as spiral galaxies and all things inbetween at all levels of the microcosmic to the macrocosmic, the great Greek minds of ages past were no less ignorant of these factseven though they didn’t possess the finer instrumentality of our modern world. Everything from rocks and plant growth, human andanimal physical proportions, to aesthetics in art, and, as was reported, that Pythagoras discovered that the harmony of musical scalesfollowed to the letter a Phi ratio. This grand discovery led the Pythagoreans and Platonists, who knew that from the smallest to thegrandest the Golden ratio Phi was represented, with which they created models and analogies for Emanation, and to declare: “(We) arethinking not of these (geometers), but of the ideals which they resemble”.For further specifics on Phi as its pertains to phenomena, art, and proportions in living things, there are several books worthy of purchase. The effort here however is to unravel the heretofore unmentioned ontological and philosophical principles which varyingpowers of Phi represented in the models, symbols, and analogies of the Pythagoreans and Platonists, and lastly, for the first timeanywhere in print, to have provided a brief overview of what exactly the philosophical meaning of Phi represents, both on its own, andin the mind of the Platonists who never tired of cogitating upon ratios, harmonies, proportions and the Phi principle which underliesthe very logos of the Absolute, the Divine Monad.“As there still remains one compound (the 5
th
Platonic solid, the dodecahedron) the fifth, which the Divine used it (asmodel/image) for the whole, broidering it with designs (images/forms)”
[Plato, Timaeus, 55C]
“Pythagoras, seeing that there are five solid figures, of which the sphere of the universe was represented by the dodecahedron.”
 [Aetius, Placita, ii, 6.5 (Thomas, I,217)]
 
1. The Divided Line of Plato
“The vivific fountain of souls is comprehended under two intellects”
[Thomas Taylor, Chaldean Oracles #91]

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