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21-11-11 Tahrir Square Under Attack

21-11-11 Tahrir Square Under Attack

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Published by William J Greenberg
Tahrir Square Under Attack: 32 Egyptians Killed, 1,750 Injured in Protests Against Military Rule Mass protests across Egypt have entered a third day, calling on the country’s military rulers to quickly transfer power to a civilian government. The fiercest clashes are taking place in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where thousands of protesters have battled with security forces since Saturday morning. The Associated Press reports today Egypt’s Ministry of Health has raised its casualty figures to 35 dead
Tahrir Square Under Attack: 32 Egyptians Killed, 1,750 Injured in Protests Against Military Rule Mass protests across Egypt have entered a third day, calling on the country’s military rulers to quickly transfer power to a civilian government. The fiercest clashes are taking place in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where thousands of protesters have battled with security forces since Saturday morning. The Associated Press reports today Egypt’s Ministry of Health has raised its casualty figures to 35 dead

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Published by: William J Greenberg on Nov 21, 2011
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Tahrir Square Under Attack: 32 Egyptians Killed, 1,750 Injured in Protests AgainstMilitary Rule
Mass protests across Egypt have entered a third day, calling on the country’s militaryrulers to quickly transfer power to a civilian government. The fiercest clashes are takingplace in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where thousands of protesters have battled with securityforces since Saturday morning. The Associated Press reports today Egypt’s Ministry of Health has raised its casualty figures to 35 dead and more than 1,750 wounded. "Our demands at the beginning of the revolution were freedom, dignity and social justice. Wehave not seen social justice," says Nasser Abdul Hadi, one of the protesters interviewedin a video report by Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous, who is onthe ground in Cairo and has covered the protests since they began. Special thanks toJacquie Soohen of Big Noise Films
AMY GOODMAN:
Mass protests in Egypt have entered a third day in citiesacross the country calling for the country’s military rulers to quickly transferpower to a civilian government, the fiercest clashes taking place in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where thousands of protesters have been battling withsecurity forces continuously since Saturday morning.
Democracy Now!
correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous is on the ground inCairo. He’s been covering the protests since they began. He files this report.
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS:
Ten months after the Egyptian revolutionbegan, Tahrir Square is once again the epicenter of a new uprising in Egypt. Thousands of people have taken to the streets to protest the SupremeCouncil of Armed Forces that came to power after the fall of Hosni Mubarak.For close to 40 straight hours, protesters clashed with security forces indowntown Cairo in some of the fiercest street battles since the revolutionbegan. Protests have spread to Alexandria, Suez and several other big cities.At least 12 people have been killed, according to the Ministry of Health, andmore than 1,400 injured, in what has become a mass stand against militaryrule. The new uprising began in the wake of a massive protest on November 18th,originally called for by Islamist groups but attended by tens of thousands of men, women and children from across the political spectrum. The protestwas staged 10 days before parliamentary elections are scheduled to takeplace. Thousands gathered in Tahrir on Friday to demonstrate against themilitary council’s rule and its recent moves to control the writing of theconstitution and entrench its grip on power. While most left the square bynightfall, a few hundred stayed the night for an open-ended sit-in. But earlythe next morning, Central Security Forces stormed Tahrir and violentlydispersed those who had set up camp. It wasn’t long before hundreds of protesters descended on Tahrir in solidarity. Clashes with police quicklyescalated. Protesters threw rocks while security forces used rubber bulletsand a seemingly endless supply of tear gas on the crowds. This is Shady Mohammed, a high school teacher.
 
SHADY MOHAMMED:
[translated] This gas burns the face. It feels like thereis poison in your mouth, and it affects your nervous system. They’ve beenfiring it since 2:00 p.m. until now, about 24 hours nonstop. We go forward,then retreat. We don’t know what they want. I was standing in the middle of the clashes. I got hit in the head with a rock and took three stitches. I’m stillhere, and I will stay here until we reach some kind of solution.
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS:
The street clashes continued unabatedthrough Saturday night and into the next day. Many hundreds werewounded. Many were overcome by tear gas and collapsed. Many were hitdirectly in the face with rubber bullets. Malek Mostafa, a well-known activist,was blinded in his right eye, as were numerous others. Protesters set up fieldhospitals in and around the square. Mohamed Abdullah is a volunteerphysician.
MOHAMED ABDULLAH:
Listen, the police here is so stupid. They have nosense. They’re killing people. They shoot guns. They was targeting on me.Not around them shoot gun, they’re targeting on people. They’re targetingthe bomb, the gas bombs. They don’t throw it randomly, OK? They throw inthe mosque, they throw in the hospital. When they get into the square, theythrow on us. They have no mind, OK? That’s all. I was there right in front of the police, OK, and bringing some patient to the clinic. They shot gas bombs.And then I was like—no barrier between us, OK? They shot me and shootgun. I got six—six pills, six balls on my head, and two balls here, and fourballs here, OK?
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS:
These were pellets?
MOHAMED ABDULLAH:
Balls, small balls. OK?
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS:
They’re very close to your eye.
MOHAMED ABDULLAH:
This is forbidden. It’s forbidden. OK? And gases.And they use stones and shoot gun and gas. OK? And—
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS:
And can you describe the effect of the gas onpeople?
MOHAMED ABDULLAH:
The gas make people dizzy, and can’t take hisbreath, and like vomiting. OK? Can’t open his eyes, tears and saliva. It likedestroys the people like five minutes. They can’t—they have no control. OK? They can’t run. They can’t move. Some people get into coma.
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS:
Chants against the Supreme Council of ArmedForces and Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, the
de facto
ruler of the country,filled the square. Protesters said they would not leave until they saw change.
NASSER ABDUL HADI:
[translated] My name is Nasser Abdul Hadi. I amhere because we don’t feel like we had a revolution at all. Our demands atthe beginning of the revolution were freedom, dignity and social justice. Wehave not seen social justice. We had a regime that looked like this buildinghere. The building is 10 stories. We got rid of two stories, but there are eightstories to go that we can’t get rid of. They’re built in tight. They’re the onesruining the country, left and right.
 
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS:
Mustafa Sadeq is a 17-year-old protester whotook part in the revolution on January 25th and was one of the thousands of young men who had flooded Tahrir once again.
MUSTAFA SADEQ:
I came here yesterday at night, because I was going—Iwas at TEDxYouth@Cairo. And then I heard about what’s happening, so Icame directly. I went home, then I waited for my parents, so they can come.And they approved, and they came with me. And the three of us went, camehere. We met lots of people who were very injured—our friends, our families,who were injured. And I went to the front lines. I checked what’s happening.People—it was awful. The CS gas is horrible. It’s uglier than ever. It’s theworst, yeah.
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS:
What other kinds of weapons are they using?
MUSTAFA SADEQ:
They’re using the rubber bullets and the other kind of bullets that, like, flashes in the air and stuff. And yeah, it hurts lots of people,like, you know, Malek Mostafa, the activist. He lost his eye. Several otherpeople lost their eyes. And actually, the revolutionary people who wereinjured in Jan. 25, they also got injured, like there was one guy who had losthis eye, and he lost his other eye yesterday. So he had both his eyes lost. It’simportant for anyone to be here, because it’s not a matter of "Yay, we’refighting the cops!" and stuff. It’s a matter of rebuilding the country frompoint zero, to start clean. And you have this grain of blackness, of evil, that’sstill here, so we have to eliminate it. So, everyone should be here.
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS:
By Sunday afternoon, the clashes showed nosigns of abating. At around 5:30 p.m., the police and the army launched acoordinated and brutal attack to take back the square. They stormed forwardwith police vehicles and large volleys of tear gas. The sound of gunfire filledthe air. The protesters were forced back into side streets. Bodies were leftlying on the ground. In disturbing footage, a motionless body was draggedby security forces a few yards to the side of the street and left amongst apile of garbage. Other bodies lay motionless on the nearby sidewalk. Afterthe police and army inexplicably retreated, protesters defiantly moved backinto the square. Their tents had been set on fire. At the field hospital, achaotic scene unfolded, with the dead and wounded being carried in indroves, many of them young boys. By nightfall, thousands had filled thesquare again with loud chants against the military council. Ambulanceswaded through the crowd, ferrying the wounded to nearby hospitals. Theoutcome of the clashes remains unclear, but Egypt is witnessing whatappears to be a renewed uprising.For
Democracy Now!
, I’m Sharif Abdel Kouddous, with Jacquie Soohen, inCairo, Egypt. Special thanks to Cressida Trew and Pierre Sioufi.
AMY GOODMAN:
This update since Sharif’s report came in: the AP reportsthe Ministry of Health in Egypt has raised its casualty figures to at least 35dead and more than 1,750 wounded. Sharif’s reporting from Egypt is madepossible in part by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

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