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Descriptive statistics

Descriptive statistics

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Published by api-3856352
the basic descrptive statistics
the basic descrptive statistics

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Published by: api-3856352 on Oct 19, 2008
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03/18/2014

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Basic Statistics
\u2022
Descriptive statistics
o
"True" Mean and Confidence Interval
o
Shape of the Distribution, Normality
\u2022
Correlations
o
Purpose (What is Correlation?)
o
Simple Linear Correlation (Pearson r)
o
How to Interpret the Values of Correlations
o
Significance of Correlations
o
Outliers
o
Quantitative Approach to Outliers
o
Correlations in Non-homogeneous Groups
o
Nonlinear Relations between Variables
o
Measuring Nonlinear Relations
o
Exploratory Examination of Correlation Matrices
o
Casewise vs. Pairwise Deletion of Missing Data
o
How to Identify Biases Caused by the Bias due to Pairwise Deletion of
Missing Data
o
Pairwise Deletion of Missing Data vs. Mean Substitution
o
Spurious Correlations
o
Are correlation coefficients "additive?"
o
How to Determine Whether Two Correlation Coefficients are Significant
\u2022
t-test for independent samples
o
Purpose, Assumptions
o
Arrangement of Data
o
t-test graphs
o
More Complex Group Comparisons
\u2022
t-test for dependent samples
o
Within-group Variation
o
Purpose
o
Assumptions
o
Arrangement of Data
o
Matrices of t-tests
o
More Complex Group Comparisons
\u2022
Breakdown: Descriptive statistics by groups
o
Purpose
o
Arrangement of Data
o
Statistical Tests in Breakdowns
o
Other Related Data Analysis Techniques
o
Post-Hoc Comparisons of Means
o
Breakdowns vs. Discriminant Function Analysis
o
Breakdowns vs. Frequency Tables
o
Graphical breakdowns
\u2022
Frequency tables
o
Purpose
o
Applications
\u2022
Crosstabulation and stub-and-banner tables
o
Purpose and Arrangement of Table
o
2x2 Table
o
Marginal Frequencies
o
Column, Row, and Total Percentages
o
Graphical Representations of Crosstabulations
o
Stub-and-Banner Tables
o
Interpreting the Banner Table
o
Multi-way Tables with Control Variables
o
Graphical Representations of Multi-way Tables
o
Statistics in crosstabulation tables
o
Multiple responses/dichotomies
Descriptive Statistics
"True" Mean and Confidence Interval. Probably the most often

used descriptive statistic is the mean. The mean is a particularly
informative measure of the "central tendency" of the variable if it is
reported along with its confidence intervals. As mentioned earlier,
usually we are interested in statistics (such as the mean) from our
sample only to the extent to which they can infer information about the
population. The confidence intervals for the mean give us a range of
values around the mean where we expect the "true" (population) mean
is located (with a given level of certainty, see alsoElementary

Concepts). For example, if the mean in your sample is 23, and the

lower and upper limits of thep=.05 confidence interval are 19 and 27
respectively, then you can conclude that there is a 95% probability that
the population mean is greater than 19 and lower than 27. If you set
thep-level to a smaller value, then the interval would become wider
thereby increasing the "certainty" of the estimate, and vice versa; as
we all know from the weather forecast, the more "vague" the
prediction (i.e., wider the confidence interval), the more likely it will
materialize. Note that the width of the confidence interval depends on
the sample size and on the variation of data values. The larger the
sample size, the more reliable its mean. The larger the variation, the
less reliable the mean (see also Elementary Concepts). The calculation
of confidence intervals is based on the assumption that the variable is
normally distributed in the population. The estimate may not be valid if
this assumption is not met, unless the sample size is large, sayn=100
or more.

Shape of the Distribution, Normality. An important aspect of the

"description" of a variable is the shape of its distribution, which tells
you the frequency of values from different ranges of the variable.
Typically, a researcher is interested in how well the distribution can be
approximated by the normal distribution (see the animation below for
an example of this distribution) (see also Elementary Concepts). Simple
descriptive statistics can provide some information relevant to this
issue. For example, if theskewness (which measures the deviation of
the distribution from symmetry) is clearly different from 0, then that
distribution isasymmetrical, while normal distributions are perfectly

symmetrical. If thekurt osis (which measures "peakedness" of the

distribution) is clearly different from 0, then the distribution is either
flatter or more peaked than normal; the kurtosis of the normal
distribution is 0.

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