Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Soc

Soc

Ratings: (0)|Views: 16|Likes:
Published by api-26783388

More info:

Published by: api-26783388 on Oct 19, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/18/2014

pdf

text

original

24
October 2003/Vol. 46, No. 10COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM
COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACMOctober 2003/Vol. 46, No. 10
25
Service-oriented computing (SOC) is the

computing paradigm that utilizes services as fundamental elements for developing applica- tions. SOC involves the service layers, function- ality, and roles (see the sidebar \u201cServices Overview\u201d) as described by the extended ser- vice-oriented architecture (SOA) depicted in the figure here. Basic services, their descriptions, and basic operations (publication, discovery, selection, and binding) that produce or utilize such descriptions constitute the SOA founda- tion. The higher layers in the SOA pyramid pro- vide additional support required for service composition and service management.

The service composition layer encompasses nec- essary roles and functionality for the consolidation of multiple services into a single composite service. The resulting composite services may be used by service aggregators as components (basic services) in further service compositions or may be utilized as applications/solutions by service clients. Service aggregators thus become service providers by pub- lishing the service descriptions of the composite service they create. Service aggregators develop specifications and/or code that permit the compos-

By M.P. Papazoglou and D. Georgakopoulos,
Guest Editors
Illustration
by
Peter Hoey
SERVICE-ORIENTED
COMPUTING
26
October 2003/Vol. 46, No. 10COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM
ite service to perform functions that include:
\u2022Coordination: Control the execution of the
component services, and manage dataflow among

them and to the output of the component service (by specifying workflow processes and using a workflow engine for run- time control of service execution).

\u2022Monitoring: Subscribe

to events or informa-
tion produced by the
component services,
and publish higher-
level composite events
(by filtering, summa-
rizing, and correlating
component events).

\u2022Conformance: Ensure

the integrity of the composite service by match-
ing its parameter types with those of its compo-
nents, impose constraints on the component
services (to ensure enforcement of business rules),
and performing data fusion activities.

\u2022 Quality of Service (QoS) composition: Lever-

age, aggregate, and bundle the component\u2019s QoS to derive the composite QoS, including the com- posite service\u2019s overall cost, performance, security, authentication, privacy, (transactional) integrity, reliability, scalability, and availability.

To manage critical applications/solutions and spe- cific markets, SOA provides managed services in the service management layer depicted at the top of the

SOA pyramid. In particular, SOA\u2019s operations man- agement functionality is aimed at supporting crit- ical applications that require enterprises to manage the service plat- form, the deployment of services and the applica- tions. Operations man- agement functionality may provide detailed application performance statistics that support assessment of the appli- cation effectiveness, per- mit complete visibility into individual business transactions, and deliver application status notifi- cations when a particular activity is completed or when a decision condi-

tion is reached. The organization responsible for per- forming such operation management functions is known as the service operator, which may be a service client or aggregator, depending on the application requirements.

Another aim of SOA\u2019s service management layer is
to provide support for open service marketplaces. Sev-
Managedserv
ices
Compositese
rvices
Basicservic
es
\u2022Coordinati
on
\u2022Conformanc
e
\u2022Monitoring
\u2022QoS
Composition
Man-
agement
Description
andBasicOpe
rations
\u2022Certificat
ion
\u2022Rating
\u2022SLAs
\u2022Assuranace
\u2022Support\u2022Di
scovery
\u2022Selection
\u2022Binding
\u2022Capability
\u2022Interface
\u2022Behavior
\u2022QoS
\u2022Publicatio
n
Market-maker
Role actions

performs
publishes
uses
becomes

Service operator
Service provider
Service aggregator
Service client
Market
Operations

Extended service-oriented
architecture: Service
layers, functionality, and roles.

Services are self-describing, open components that
support rapid, low-cost composition of distributed
applications. Services are offered by service
providers\u2014organizations that procure the service
implementations, supply their service descriptions,
and provide related technical and business support.
Since services may be offered by different enterprises
and communicate over the Internet, they provide a
distributed computing infrastructure for both intra-
and cross-enterprise application integration and col-

laboration.

Service descriptions are used to advertise the
service capabilities, interface, behavior, and qual-
ity. Publication of such information about available
services provides the necessary means for discov-
ery, selection, binding, and composition of services.
In particular, the service capability description
states the conceptual purpose and expected results

of the service (by using terms or concepts defined
in an application-specific taxonomy). The service
interface description publishes the service signa-
ture (its input/output/error parameters and mes-
sage types). The (expected) behavior of a service
during its execution is described by its service
behavior description (for example, as a workflow
process). Finally, the Quality of Service (QoS)
description publishes important functional and
nonfunctional service quality attributes, such as
service metering and cost, performance metrics
(response time, for instance), security attributes,
(transactional) integrity, reliability, scalability,
and availability. Service clients (end-user organi-
zations that use some service) and service aggrega-
tors (organizations that consolidate multiple
services into a new, single service offering) utilize
service descriptions to achieve their objectives.c

Overview of Services

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->