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Scorpio 29: An Indian squaw pleading to the chief for the lives of her children

Scorpio 29: An Indian squaw pleading to the chief for the lives of her children

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Published by Starling
Scorpio 29: An Indian squaw pleading to the chief for the lives of her children
The descend According proper from the t he n o un an I n di a n does not root.

Indo-European

Online
word

E t ym ol o gi c a l
English

D i c t i on a ry ,

entered

f r o m t h e L a t i n In di a , b y w a y o f t h e G r e e k

In di a m e a n i n g “ r e gi o n o f t h e I n d u s Ri v e r ”
a n d l a t e r u se d t o d e s c r i b e t h e re g i o n behind it. T h e se from two the terms Sanskrit d e sc e n d
Scorpio 29: An Indian squaw pleading to the chief for the lives of her children
The descend According proper from the t he n o un an I n di a n does not root.

Indo-European

Online
word

E t ym ol o gi c a l
English

D i c t i on a ry ,

entered

f r o m t h e L a t i n In di a , b y w a y o f t h e G r e e k

In di a m e a n i n g “ r e gi o n o f t h e I n d u s Ri v e r ”
a n d l a t e r u se d t o d e s c r i b e t h e re g i o n behind it. T h e se from two the terms Sanskrit d e sc e n d

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Published by: Starling on Nov 25, 2011
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04/04/2014

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Starling Hunter © 2011 1
Scorpio 29: An Indian squaw pleading to the chief for the livesof her children
The proper noun
Indian
does not descend from an Indo-European root.According the
Online Etymological Dictionary 
, the word entered Englishfrom the Latin
India 
, by way of the Greek 
 India 
 
meaning “region of the Indus River”
and later used to describe the regionbehind it. These two terms descendultimately, from the Sanskrit 
sindhu 
 
which means “river.”
1
The word
river 
descends from the Indo-European(IE) root 
rei-1
 
which means “to scratch, tear, cut.”
2
Other descendantsinclude the words
rimose 
,
row, rope, rive, rift rife, riparian, ravage,arrive, ripe, reap,
and
ripple 
.The word
squaw
descends from the Massachuset (Algonquian)
squa 
meaning “woman” and the Narraganset 
squaws 
 
also meaning “woman.”
3
 The word
plead
descends from the IE root 
plak-1
 
which means “to beflat.”
4
Other words descending from this root include
flow, flake, flag,flaw, placebo, placid, plea, plead, pleasant, please, complacent,complaisant, supple, implacable, placate, planchet, plank, plagiary, playa, placenta 
, and
archipelago 
.The word
chief
descends from the IE root 
kaput-
 
which means “head.”
Paronyms include the words
caprice, achieve, biceps, caddie, cadet,capital, capitol, capitulate, captain, cattle, chapter, chef, chief, corporal,head, kerchief,
and
mischief.
 
1 http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=India2 Watkins, C. (2000), The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo European Roots, p. 703 http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=squaw4 Watkins, C. (2000), The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo European Roots, p. 675 Watkins, C. (2000), The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo European Roots, p. 37
 
Starling Hunter © 2011 2
Finally, the keyword
live
descends from the IE root 
leip-
, “to stick,adhere; fat.” Its
paronyms include the words
live, lively, leave, liver,delay, relay,
and
synalepha.
 The word
children
descends from the Old English
cild 
meaning “child,infant” and more remotely from the Gothic
kilpei 
meaning “womb” an
dthe Danish
kuld 
 
meaning “children of the same marriage.”
6
 
THEMES: 
There are three
BODY PARTS
mentioned above
twointernal organs, i.e. the
womb 
and the
liver 
, and the
biceps 
. There aretwo literary or
LINGUISTIC TERMS
. The first is
synalepha 
which descendsfrom the root 
leip-
and which means “
the blending into one syllable of two successive vowels of adjacent syllables, especially to fit a poetic
meter”, e.g. “th’elite” instead of “the elite.”
7
The second literary word is
 plagiary 
or
 plagiarism 
whi
ch means the “putting forth as original tooneself the ideas or words of another.”
8
 Finally, there is a third group of terms dealing with
CRIME
, one of which nominally involves a crime against children. The first of thesewords is plagiary or plagiarism which descends from the Latin
 plagiaries 
 
which means “kidnapper, seducer, plunderer” and which later came to be
used in the literary sense.
9
The criminal meaning of this term has fallenout of use now and when it is mentioned in dictionaries, the definition is
appended with the label “obs” or “arch” meaning “obsolete” or “archaic,”
respectively.
10
The other crime-related terms are the compounds
“criminal
mischief  
” and “malicious
mischief  
” which are defined below:
 
A specific injury or damage caused by another person's action or inaction. In CivilLaw, a person who suffered physical injury due to the Negligence of another personcould allege mischief in a lawsuit in
TORT
. For example, if a baseball is hit through aperson's window by accident, and the resident within is injured, mischief can be claimed.
6 http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=child7 http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dictionary/entry/synalepha8 http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dictionary/entry/plagiarize9 http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=plagiarism10 See, for example, http://machaut.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/WEBSTER.sh?WORD=plagiary

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