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S03-04_USESFsheet

S03-04_USESFsheet

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Published by REBogart
Addendum to "Brittle Power"
Security for a typical year (2000)
Addendum to "Brittle Power"
Security for a typical year (2000)

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Published by: REBogart on Oct 21, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/09/2014

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U.S.Energy Security
facts
(for a typical year,2000)
A
MORY
B. L
OVINS
, CEO, R
OCKY
M
OUNTAIN
I
NSTITUTE
2 J
UNE
2003
S
UPPORTED
B
Y
T
HE
O
VERBROOK
F
OUNDATION
, T
HE
J.M. K
APLAN
F
UND
,
AND
T
HE
C
OMPTON
F
OUNDATION
 
Half of the oil used in the United States is imported.
One-fourth of oil usage comes from OPEC countries, one-seventh fromArab OPEC countries, and one-eighth from Persian Gulf countries.
15% of our net oil imports come from Saudi Arabia.
Of that, two-thirds rely on a single processing plant and two terminals. Each isvulnerable to sabotage or attack that would have long-lasting consequences.
OPEC’s cartel power to keep oil prices above competitive levels is estimated tohave cost the U.S. economy somewhere between $4 trillion and $14 trillion over the past 30 years.
That’s roughly a year’s GDP.
Net oil imports
cost the U.S. $109 billion in 2000.In the 25 years from 1975 to 2000, the total was
two trillion dollars
.
The United States
has 4.6% of the world’s population and produces21% of Gross World Product. But it
uses 26% of the world’s oil,produces 9%, and
owns only 2–3%
.We can’t drill our way out of this one.
Americans pay as much for transportation fuels as fornational defense.
U.S. light vehicles (cars and light trucks) use 70% ofoil imports,
or 2.9 times Persian Gulf imports, or nearly as much as SaudiArabia produces.
Model Year 2002 cars and light trucks hit a
22-year efficiency low
.Yet if they’d stayed the same in weight and peppiness as in 1981, they’d be 33%more efficient by now,
displacing Persian Gulf oil 2.5 times over
.
If the hydrogen now used to make gasoline and other fuels in U.S. refineriesinstead fueled superefficient fuel-cell SUVs directly, they’d save a quarter ofU.S. gasoline—
twice as much as Persian Gulf oil supplies
.
 
In peacetime,the cost of maintainingmilitary forces earmarkedfor Persian Gulf intervention
costsapproximately $60 billion a year —or
$1.58 a gallon
paid through our taxes rather than at the pump.
If forces with a Persian Gulf primary mission were motivated entirely by ourdesire to protect access to Persian Gulf oil, the true cost of Persian Gulf oilwould approach
$100 per barrel.
Even in peacetime,
the Pentagon is the world’s biggestbuyer of refined oil products
— enough to drive each U.S. carcoast-to-coast every 4 years. Fighting a Gulf war can use as much oil aswe import from Kuwait or Iraq. For$7 billion—the amount of money spentby the United States on the 1991 Gulf War — we could have created energyefficiencies that would have eliminated our need for Persian Gulf oil.
Cost-effective windpower potential in the Dakotas
could make enough hydrogen to fuel (if efficiently used)
all U.S. highway vehicles
.
U.S.Energy Security
facts
(for a typical year,2000)
U.S. imported oil use 
Source: EIA,
Annual Energy Review 2001
(November 2002)
light vehicles (70%)
cars and light trucks
other uses (30%)

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