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The LaSallian (October 2005)

The LaSallian (October 2005)

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I
f demonstrators are fighting for their right to freedom of expression in the national arena,non-Catholic Lasallians inside DLSU are also fighting for another kind of right—their rightto religious freedom.Concerned student leaders are spearheading the campaign for the inclusion of the rightto religious freedom to the Students’ Charter. Mark Edward Nanquil, Executive Vice President(EVP) of Academic Policy Research Engagement and Lobbying (APREL), which is under theOffice of the Vice President (OVP) for Academics of the Student Council (SC), together withnon-Catholic students are initiating the campaign. According to Nanquil, “For this year, we all know that the Student Handbook will be re- vised and it’s actually a good timing for the Student Charter to be revised as well. That’s why  we also thought of lobbying for the right to religious freedom to be included in the Students’Charter.”
Recognizing FAITH
The proposed bill seeks to recognize and accredit non-Catholic organizations inside the schoolso that they will be given the same rights, such as the legitimate right to use the facilities of theUniversity during their activities, which are afforded to Catholic organizations within DLSU.They would not need to mask their activities in order to be approved anymore.Moreover, the proposed act aims to stop the passage of University policies that might reducethe religious freedom of its students and might bar other religions and non-Catholic religiouspractices inside the campus.Meanwhile, the DLSU administration, as stated in the draft, shall encourage academic dis-cussions of religion and other related subjects inside the university too. In relation to this, theuniversity administration, with the assistance of the SC, should support different sectors insidethe University in promoting religious freedom and the religious interests of Lasallians.Nanquil asserts that it will be good for DLSU to include the right to religious freedomin the Students’ Charter, because it is one of the key factors in helping the university achieve a world-class status.“I believe that DLSU is, in fact, on its way to being a world- class university and therefore, onesmall step to accomplish that goal is to recognize that a world class university should be open tointernational students, who are not necessarily Catholics. I believe that religious freedom is oneof the crucial elements of a university, wherein students, regardless of race and religion, could beaccepted freely and could be an integral part of the system,” the EVP of APREL said.
'Let ReligiousFreedom ring'
Former faculty criticizesstudent activists
"Shut up and go back to your books!"These were the blunt words, published in an article on Inq7.net, with which former College of Engineering professor Eric Gutierrez castigated therecent spate of Lasallian student protest actions.These statements were prompted at the height of the Gloriagate politicaldrama, and the deafening calls for the President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo(PGMA) to make the supreme sacrifice, which DLSU has been initiating.
Words of disappointment?
“I am dismayed by what you students are doing these days. You studentsrally for causes that are self-dooming. You students help destabilize and em-barrass this country that you think you love so much,” Gutierrez said. Hefurther stressed that students should instead focus on their studies, this beingthe very reason why they are in school.He accentuated that the students’ involvement in the said efforts tooust PGMA is defeating their very own principles, noting that their drasticpolitical participation will make them the next generation of the same kindof people they cursed on the street –traditional politicians, or as he said,maybe even worse.“On top of all this, you seem to think you know everything under thesun, that’s why you students involve yourselves in matters you should stay away from – politics,” he further added.
The defense of the students
 Ayleen Ortiz, a professor of the Filipino Department, believes that “noone has the right to obstruct the students or anyone on that matter, to exercisetheir constitutional rights.”Student Council (SC) Secretary and active youth leader Kate Lim seesGutierrez’ pronouncements as a solid attack on her part, remarking that itsomehow depicted an apparent definition of who she is. Nevertheless, shebelieves that there is no way that such statement can hinder the youth frompursuing a fight which they have already begun. As proof of the conviction of the student leaders, Lim further reiteratedthat the SC has already made a stand even before the Lasallian Brothers cameup with Restoring Faith in Democracy, in which the Brothers asked PGMA to make the “supreme sacrifice.” Although Gutierrez’ statement is a clear condemnation on their part, shestill wants to look at it on a brighter note. “Still, it is good that someone iscriticizing you, quite obviously he is coming from a different perspective,”Lim closed.Both Lim and Ortiz share the same view that learning does not beginand end in the four corners of a classroom. It certainly goes beyond thatbecause genuine learning is realizing that each student has a responsibility to the society where he/she belongs.
Br. Roly resigns from Con-Com
Br. Rolando Dizon FSC resigned from his position as vice-chairman of the Consultative Commission (Con-Com) lastOct. 5, a few days after being elected. His resignation wasdiscussed in a meeting of the District Council and Community Directors of the De La Salle Brothers which was called by Br.Edmundo Fernandez, FSC. “Health reasons” seem to be whatis behind Br. Roly’s resignation.
History repeating itself?
Br. Roly, who was DLSU-SystemPresident from 1998 to 2003, was also atthe helm of the Commission on HigherEducation (CHED) a year ago. WhileBr. Roly was the chairman of CHED, helaunched a more affordable and wide-ranging student loan program for college juniors, seniors and graduating students.CHED was praised for making an effortto increasing the accessibility of tertiary education to Filipinos. There was also anincrease in the number of Filipino seafarersdue to the improved standard of educa-tion for Marine Engineering and MarineTransportation courses.However, Dizon’s term as chairman was also cut short when he resigned on September 25 of last year. His term, which was supposed to end until July 20, 2006, was madeabrupt, also because of supposed health concerns.Still, Dizon’s move at that time was surrounded by contro- versy, and questions of whether politics and conflicts within thecommission had anything to do with his stepping down.Currently, the Brother is director-at-large of the CatholicEducational Association of the Philippines (CEAP).
The Con-Com dilemma
The Con-Com, a body that would tackle theissue of charter change, is headed by former Uni- versity of the Philippines President Jose Abueva.They are tasked to review the 1987 Constitution,conduct public consultations, propose appropri-ate amendments, and make recommendations.However, it would still be up to the Congressto approve the changes.The Con-Com is composed of entrepre-neurs, members of the academe, constitutionalexperts, incumbent and former local officials andeven journalists. Formed by President GloriaMacapagal-Arroyo, the commission should ac-complish its task by Dec. 15. While some might agree with the establish-ment of the charter consultative body, DLSUSystem President Br. Armin Luistro FSC said that in spite of the Constitution’s imperfections, constitutional amendment“will be more of a distraction rather than a help.” He closedby saying that modifying the Constitution “will not guaranteethat things will be better.”
FRANCESCA STA. ANA
LET RELIGIOUS, SEE PAGE 2
CRISCEL LAMSIN
45 YEARS OF RELENTLESS CAMPUS JOURNALISM.
PHOTO BY DAN NABLE
 ADMINISTRATION, SEE PAGE 2
ROYCE ROBERT ZUÑIGA
The DLSU- Employees Association(DLSU-EA) continues its legal battles with the DLSU-Administration. It hasaired its side on the issue; now, the Ad-ministration shared its sentiments.
The Grievance Machinery
 According to Human ResourceDevelopment (HRD) Director, Atty.Enrico Lusica, the grievance machin-ery, which comes from the Collec-tive Bargaining Agreement (CBA), is working.It follows a step-by-step processin the resolution of conflicts betweenthe Administration and the employ-ees. There are two steps in resolvinga dispute that is being handled by thegrievance machinery. Normally, casesare being referred to the HRD level, which is composed of an official rep-resentative from the employees’ unionand the HRD Director. However, whenthe HRD Director renders its decisionand the employees are not satisfied with it, they may appeal their case tothe Committee Level. Four members,two from the administration and theunion, and two alternates for each of the parties, comprise the GrievanceCommittee.DLSU-EA President Baylon Bañez,meantime, claimed that the Adminis-tration is "authorizing themselves toappoint the representative of the em-ployee to the Discipline Board.
Admin clarifies legal employment issues
ROYCE ROBERT ZUÑIGA
Facelift.
Workers continue to refurbish the Rizal Stadium for the upcoming Sea Games 2005.
VOL. XLVI NO. 5
THE OFFICIAL STUDENT PUBLICATION OF DE LA SALLE UNIVERSITY
13 OCTOBER 2005
The LaSallian
 
J
apanese expertise is seen to reinforceDLSU’s academic strengths with theinauguration of a Tokyo Tech Officelast Sept. 29. DLSU played host to theinauguration rites of the office at the North Wing of the Marilen Gaerlan Conservatory.Guests from the Philippine government,DLSU Administration, and the Japanesecontingent graced the event.The event marks the renewal of long-standing ties between the Philippines and Ja-pan in the fields of education and research.This office serves as the gateway forcommunication across these two nationsas it bridges the gap through the use of teleconferencing via satellite connection tothe Internet, the only one of its kind in thePhilippines. For the first time, the remark-able technology was showcased as the event was aired simultaneously in Tokyo Techthrough a live feed.
Japanese bayanihan
This facility is the outcome of decadesof cooperation between the Tokyo Instituteof Technology and DLSU. As early as 1985,the Japan Society for the Promotion of Sci-ence already made an agreement with theDepartment of Science and Technology (DOST) for academic exchange and re-search cooperation. On May 20,1992 TokyoTech and DLSU signed an Agreement forCooperation detailing the activities to beundertaken by the two institutions.Under the agreement, both schoolspledged to undertake joint research andpublications, exchange experts for lectures,meetings and sharing of information, ex-change of invitations of researchers to con-ferences, colloquia and symposia, exchangeof information and lastly, the exchange of faculty members and students for study andresearch. According to the Agreement on Es-tablishing the Tokyo Tech Office in DLSUsigned last May 30, the main goal of theoffice is to strengthen the academic and re-search networks through distance education.The primary role of the Tokyo Tech Officeis to be the focal point of technological ex-change between Japan and the Philippines.
Flaunting the hardware
Located at the fifth floor of the Velascobuilding, the office houses the latest ininformation and communication technol-ogy that allows easy contact with Japanesecounterparts. The office can provide detailson studying at Tokyo Tech, make possiblethe steady exchange of information betweenthose who are conducting joint research andstudy, facilitate academe and industry link-ages and maintain individual contact withFilipino exchange students in Japan.The office also can provide access to themost up-to-date journals of prominent Japa-nese researchers. This assistance is extendedto other institutions interested in participat-ing in the various programs.Interested parties may contact EngineerRonaldo Gallardo, the local manager, orProfessor Hiroo Niiyama, the director of Tokyo Tech Office Philippines.
Recent developments
Tokyo Tech has given its full support tothe advancement of research efforts espe-cially in the field of Chemical Engineeringfor which DLSU has been nominated as thehost institution among ASEAN universities. As part of this support, Tokyo Tech hasgranted full funding to three new researchprojects proposed by DLSU. On top of thisfinancial help, tools and equipment were alsosent from abroad in order to facilitate quality research and development.Two staff were also admitted under theTokyo Tech UNESCO program to study in Japan.
The role of the office
In a speech prepared by DOST Secretary Dr. Estrella Alabastro read by EngineeringDean Dr. Pag-asa Gaspillo during the inau-guration rites of the Tokyo Tech Office, “theTokyo Tech Office can provide the platformto strengthen existing partnerships or createnew and mutually beneficial collaborativeprojects”.She also lauded DLSU for taking initia-tive in hosting the office and in keeping withone of the government’s top priorities.From a fifth place finish last year, De La Salle University (DLSU) improved to third place in the recently concludedinter-university finance competition sponsored by the JuniorFinancial Executives of the Philippines (FINEX).The competition was held last Sept. 27 at the University of Makati. DLSU ranked behind University of the Philip-pines (UP) and University of Sto. Tomas (UST), whichretained their first and second place finishes last year. UPscored a total of 740 points, UST 660 and DLSU 620 outof a perfect score of 1000.Finance students from different schools all over thecountry joined the competition. A selected few passed theelimination round, where DLSU ranked fifth.In the final round, DLSU gave other schools a scareas it slowly climbed up the rankings. UP and UST provedto be tough opponents, as DLSU failed to catch up withthem. DLSU finished third, followed by Ateneo De ManilaUniversity and DLSU-Dasmariñas at fourth and fifth places,respectively. The contest covered topics like Accounting,Finance, Ethics, and Economics.DLSU was represented by Andrew Pua (BSA), Wain-right Gregory Yu (BSA), Mark Gloriani (AE-MFI), ChloeChizu Go (AE-BSA), and Thai Dang Hoang (MFI). They  were chosen among a pool of students who were referredby different departments of the College of Business andEconomics (CBE).The team conducted its training under the guidance of  Antonio Zamora.The team also underwent training from different CBEdepartments. Executive Vice-President Dr. Carmelita Que-bengco provided financial support to the delegates.DLSU has competed in all seven FINEX-held com-petitions. This year marks the second straight year thatDLSU failed to regain the championship it held last 2002and 2003.
Training
 According to Dr. Junette Perez, chair of the Manage-ment of Financial Institutions Department, other teamshad longer and more rigorous training in preparation forthe competition.Some even prepared for one to two years. UST fourth year accounting stalwart and representativeSmith Lim likewise said that their team rushed prepara-tions for some topic coverages of the contest, particularly thefinance portion. Lim shared that the UST team had serioustraining for approximately one month.Digressing, it may be noted that the Mathematics’Trainers Guild, Philippines, an organization that trainsmathematically talented children for international mathcompetitions, trains students as early as elementary all the way until second year high school.During this period, several persons are chosen to com-pete in the elementary and high school competitions. Addressing limited preparation time, the University’slong term plan is to identify potential team members in asearly as their sophomore year, and train them for competi-tion during their junior and senior years.Dr. Perez and the rest of the faculty were satisfied aboutthis year’s results. She attested to the intelligence and man-ners that the team displayed during the competition. Shealso expressed her hopes of bringing the championship back to DLSU in the competitions to come.The DLSU team bagged a trophy and cash prizeamounting to twenty thousand pesos, which the teammembers equally shared among themselves.
Lasallians place third in FINEXTokyo Tech to supplement DLSU's educational drive
DLSU undergrad graces Hollywood
 
Christian acheivers for God and country - this is whatDLSU envisions its students to become. However,some students seem to have stretched this vision a littlefurther, landing on the shores of the United States andHollywood. Pam Tan, who took up BS Philosophy inDLSU-Manila in 1999, proves that she’s not just anaverage Fil-Am.Tan discontinued her study in DLSU and movedto New York University. After completing her degreein Philosophy in New York, she went on to pursue anacting career in Hollywood. She is currently involved in major acting projects, which is why she is closely linked to today’s top Hollywood celebrities. Butaside from affiliating with the stars, she is working on a film about the late PopeJohn Paul II together with a close friend and filmmaker, Robert Evans. She isthe executive producer of the said film entitled
The Power of Faith
.She recently visited the country, from July 19 to Sept. 9, in order topromote
The Power of Faith
. She was a guest in different television shows, allinterested in how she made it big in Hollywood. Tan confessed that it was noteasy for her to get to her present status and many people didn’t believe that shecan make it, but she pushed through anyway, disproving those nonbelievers.Tan was eager to make her mark in Hollywood, especially since she believedthat Asians are under-represented there and it was time for Asians to step outinto the limelight. Moreover, she wanted to share her success with the country, which gave her the best memories of her life.Despite Tan’s success in Hollywood, she never forgets to look back andthank her roots. Although her stay in the University was only for a short time,she remembers and cherishes every minute of it. In fact, before leaving thecountry, she wanted to get something across to the students via her website,pamtan.com: “My message to all of you: love and make wise use of every minutein our University. When those days are over, you will face tremendous pressureoutside. And when you do, remember that we bear the name of our University and our personal honor. So don’t forget to always give your best shot.”In her short stay in DLSU, Tan was active in student organizations such asEnglicom and Student Council.
FELICE CARIASORAYMUND CHRISTOPHER CUESICOMARK ANTHONY BARIT
U
 NIVERSIT
Y
The LaSallian
In Review
The pie graph reveals that though DLSU is a Roman Catholic institution,there is a significant number of non-Catholic students who belong to other denominations such as Protestantism, Islam and Hinduism. Accordingto the article, "Drawing the Line of Faith" published in Paradigms, theDLSU student population is composed of 72.46 percent Catholics, 22.15percent other religions, and 5.39 percent Protestant and Born AgainChristians. The statistics, provided by Executive Vice President Dr.Carmelita Quebengco, were as of 2004.DLSU had been very open to other religions and strongly encouragedreligious freedom. According to
La Salle:1911-1986 
, “De LaSalle Collegein the 1970s went ecumenical as well as international in its outlook.” Thebook stressed that DLSU took care of the needs of Protestant studentsas it invited the Protestant-based Campus Crusade for Christ to holdits activities in DLSU. It was during that time that BIGKIS, a religiousorganization of Protestant origin, was introduced.
On proselytizing
 Andy Simeon, Coordinator of Community Building and ChristianEducation (CBCE), which is a com-ponent of the La Sallian Pastoral Of-fice (LSPO), and one of the resourcepersons that attended the SC meetingabout religious freedom, believes thatthere is nothing wrong with startingdiscussions about religious freedom.However, he has some reservations with regard to the issue on proselyt-izing. Section 13.3.2.7 of the StudentHandbook defines, “proselytizing asan attempt to convert another to one’sfaith by attacking or denigrating otherperson’s practices and beliefs, or by of-fering special inducements.The CBCE Coordinator opined,“They (non-Catholic religious organi-zations) can do that (recruitment of members)—but not inside the school.The school is not asking them not topractice their religion. Actually, theschool is telling them to practice theirreligion. But they cannot do that freely inside the school because it contradictsthe nature of the school. If they wouldlike to attend in a school, wherein theschool can be so open, so accommodat-ing—I’m sorry, it’s not La Salle. They could look for another school, they cango to the non-Catholic schools [or]they can go to Christian schools andthen they could do that.”In response to Simeon, Nanquil saidthat the problem is not about the re-cruitment of members of non-Catholicorganizations because they need it fortheir operations like solicitations anddocumentations, but the problem liesin the view of the DLSU administrationas regards the conversion of faith.“We believe that conversion of faithis not a bad thing. For us, it is only aprocess of enlightening a student of  which god he or she should believe in,or which type of lifestyle he or she wantsto choose. We believe that Lasallians aremature and therefore, when they decideto convert or change, it is by their ownfree will that they decide to convert toanother faith,” Nanquil asserted.EVP Dr. Carmleita Quebengco, forher part, has nothing against the draftas long as it conforms to the relevantprovisions of the Philippine constitutionand it does not violate the University’spolicy that is prohibiting proselytizingon campus.
In the Name of Religion
Currently, BnE 2005 Legislative Assembly (L.A.) Representative, Chris-topher Ngo is at the helm of a signaturecampaign, which tries to garner supportfor the proposed act from non-Catholicand Catholic students alike inside theuniversity. According to Ngo, “the signaturecampaign has been going on for a week already and it has been going well. We decided to extend the signaturecampaign for another week so that wecan advocate the issue to even morestudents and gain their support. Asidefrom gaining their support, we also want this signature campaign to be a way for the students to know and tobe aware of what religious freedomreally is.”In line with this, Nanquil and those who are pushing for the inclusion of the right to religious freedom in theStudents’ Charter will still continueto educate the student body, and willhold talks with different groups in theLasallian community, in order to gainsupport for the proposed act.For his part, CBCE CoordinatorSimeon believes that, “the draft is stillopen for dialogues in order to make itmore acceptable to everybody. There’snothing wrong with opening that upand there’s nothing wrong with push-ing for that as a policy and I really encourage that—to open up this kindof talk so that we can have this kind of understanding because if nobody willstart this, I don’t know how long we’llstill be in the dark.”
Lockout on sponsorships
From a strictly profit-based perspective, lockouts can be consid-ered as very good avenues of school commercialism. A lockout is an agreement between two parties that basically gives the sponsoring organization the exclusive right to sell andpromote their goods to the sponsored organization.Usually, these companies sponsor university programs andactivities in order to associate their brands with these events.These are means for companies to gain entry to a school. Thereis sense in this venture since in DLSU's case, it is an institutioncomposed of students coming from relatively well-to-do socialclasses, and as such, it is a strategic market for selling the mer-chandise of these companies.DLSU continues to have lockouts with several companies.Even if DLSU enters into lockouts with these companies, thereis still no formal policy that governs these agreements. This isdisadvantageous for the university because lockouts are deemedto be market distortions and as such, it violates the basic freemarket principles on competition. Also, when market forces are ignored, there is a possibility of abuse within a lockout agreement. There is a danger that thesupplier will take advantage of imposing unreasonable termsfor a campus.Hence the school needs to be consulted first if it wants tobe part of the lockout agreement or not. In the case of Globe,though not a lockout, the school was consulted so that the termsof the agreement would not go against school policies.However, according to Ildemac Bautista, head of FinanceInvestment under the Office of the President, some ground rulesare already sketched out. These are pending for the approval of System President Br. Armin Luistro FSC, in order to addressthese problems.These ground rules try to see if the university can imposemarket discipline in entering into agreements with companies.For example, before going through an exclusive contract witha company, DLSU will take proposals from rival companies. Inthis way, DLSU will be able to compare the various agreementsoffered by the different companies and it could choose the bestpossible deal.
JOYCE ANNE ALFONSO
LET RELIGIOUS , FROM PAGE 1
U
 NIVERSIT
Y
The LaSallian
JOYCE ANNE ALFONSO
I
n response to the demand for scholarships and sponsorships forstudent athletes, Globe Telecom and De La Salle University (DLSU) signed a contract last Sept. 23 for a University Athlet-ics Association of the Philippines (UAAP) team endorsement. Theagreement, duly signed by DLSU System President Br. ArminLuistro FSC and Globe President was a four million peso, one year deal.The contract makes Globe the official sponsor of all the UAAPteams of DLSU for next school year.However, Executive Vice President Dr. Quebengco stressedthat DLSU’s contract with Globe is not a lockout. What bothparties agreed to is “the right to first refusal,” which means thatif any telecom company sponsorship is needed by an organization within DLSU, the first one to be asked is Globe. If by chance thatGlobe refuses or disapproves the request that is the only time theorganizations can approach other telecom companies.Br. Bobby Casingal FSC, director of the Office of Sports De- velopment (OSD), said that the deal is a response to the problemsit has been experiencing. Every year, the OSD spends a significantamount of money for athletic scholarships, coaches’ salaries, rentals,and the like. All of these spending boil down to one effect: a budgetdeficit for the department. The OSD needed to devise a fundraisingscheme without taxing the school and the students. The sponsorshipis seen to be the solution to the OSD’s dilemma.
The General Deal
The proposal was initially offered by Globe, which was revisedto conform to the relevant campus policies of the university. Dr.Carmelita Quebengco, Executive Vice President (EVP), attestedthat the agreement can present the opportunity of giving morescholarship slots for student athletes and providing them with betterequipment and supplies.The contract states that whenever DLSU plays in any game,the teams will carry the Globe logo on their uniforms. Aside fromthis, Globe will have the opportunity of putting up a stall at thebookstore of the Don Enrique Razon Sports Complex.In terms of sponsoring student activities such as job fairs orprojects presented by the Office of Student Activities (OSAc), thedeal asserts that Globe will have the liberty of asking for a listing, where student organizations can present their plans for the whole year. The telecom giant will then select the activities it wants tosponsor. A certain project is proposed to be explored as another meansof gaining more funds without taxing the students. This projectcomes in the form of having a DLSU Menu in the Add-On Servicesof Globe. This service might help DLSU students who are Globeusers to avail of services such as checking of schedules, online an-nouncements, and access to the Office of the University Registrarfor transcripts without the use of the DLSU Help Desk.On the other hand, the Student Council has just recently launched its text hotline (2955) for subscribers of all networks.Br. Bobby said that this project may take a long time to proc-ess and set up because of safety parameters like the security of theUniversity’s data and programs, and the possible added cost of theservice for students.
Students not consulted?
The contract was signed, but it raised the eyebrows of someofficers of the Student Council (SC). The SC claimed that they  were not consulted regarding the deal. Simoun Ferrer, VP-Ac-tivities, expressed that they talked to OSD about the issue. Beforecontract signing, they requested to look at the provisions of theagreement.The OSD answered that before the contract will be signed,the draft will be shown to the SC in case some revisions will bemade. The contract signing nonetheless commenced without theknowledge of the SC. However, Ferrer admits that although theSC doesn’t know if the contract explicitly disallows them to seethe provisions, the fact of the matter is that the "OSD bypassedrepresentation the SC might have done for the students."Br. Bobby clarified that no one was allowed to see the contractbefore it was signed. It was not merely a secrecy issue, but rather ameasure against rival telecom companies.Dr. Quebengco stated that there is no need to consult the SCabout the deal as it is already mentioned to the students. "This isnot being kept from anyone and any student could have reactedto it or given us comments directly. No policy is violated by thisagreement,students are not adversely affected by it; in fact, ourathletes have everything to gain from it.so what is there to consultabout?" Dr. Quebengco reasoned.
DLSU, Globe ink P4 milliondeal; contract not a lockout
PHOTO BY TIANEL ESPIRITU
 ADMINISTRATION, FROM PAGE 1
Over the past few months, issues on merging several partsof the Student Personnel Services (SPS) have emerged.Last Oct. 6, Dr. Carmelita Pabiton, dean of Student Affairs, met the student leaders of Student Council,Student Publications Office (SPO), Cultural Arts Office(CAO), and Council for Student Organizations (CSO).The dean asked the students to assess the strengthsand weaknesses of the SPS as an umbrella organizationfor students. The dean also asked what possible officescould be merged in SPS to further intensify their func-tions and avoid overlap operations. The student leadersreplied through writing their concerns. According to a reliable source within Student Pub-lication Office (SPS), the initial stages of this plan havematerialized in the form of job auditing performed by the Internal Audit Office.The interviewing process that started last May isalready finished. The auditor phoned some SPS person-nel and asked basic questions about their functions.Information about the whole process was communicatedto SPS staff.The source showed an email that was sent to himabout job auditing and “possible reorganization of theSPS office.”
The LaSallian
tried to get the evaluation of job audit-ing to Dr. Carmelita Pabiton. However, the dean cannot yet reveal the facts because of administration matters.The publication also tried to get the side of otherSPS offices, but most of them don't want to commenton the issue.Many SPS staff members have shown apprehensiontowards the audit. Fears of dissolved positions arise, ag-gravated by the recent economic hardships, the sourcesaid. A freeze hiring order was even laid because of theaudit, the source also stated.On the other hand, the source speculated the pos-sible merging of two offices: Student Development Office(SDO) and Office of Student Activities (OSAc), as wellas the SPO and CAO. The source cited a possible reasonthat SDO and OSAc would function efficiently if housedin one office. As of press time, the Student Affairs Office is continu-ously evaluating the possible changes in SPS.The merging of offices is also an issue being discussedby colleges. These included the possible merging of Me-chanical Engineering and Manufacturing Engineeringand Management, as well as Business Management andMarketing Department.In response to the DLSU-EA President's claim, Lusicasaid that he cannot commenton this issue because it is stillunder litigation to be resolvedin the case entitled, DLSU-EA,Peralta et al . vs. DLSU et al., which is now pending in the Ar-bitration Branch of the NationalLabor Relations Commission.“The number of “griev-ance” as contemplated by theCBA to be processed throughthe Grievance Machinery asprovided in the CBA, in aschool year, may be approxi-mately placed anywhere fromzero to five grievances a school year,” Atty. Lusica revealed.
“Within easy reach”
The HRD Director dis-closed that despite the numer-ous cases the DLSU-EA hasfiled against the Administrationand vice versa, the Administra-tion has frequently tried toreach out and communicate tothe union.“The Administration hasconsistently been within easy reach, open to communication,and responsive to the require-ments of circumstances. Asidefrom the Labor- ManagementRelations Council, and theGrievance Machinery, as venuesthat exist for communication,the University is always opento address any concern,” Lusicashared. As of now, there are 29 legalcases filed by the DLSU-EA against the Administration thatare still unresolved. Accord-ing to Bañez, the Departmentof Labor and Employment(DOLE) rated DLSU with themost number of employmentcases in Metro Manila.
Dean consults student leaderson possible reorganization of SPS
DONELLE GAN AND PAUL GARILAO
Faces among the crowd.
These are the faces that will shape tomorrow.
PHOTO BYCHYNNA CHAN
Tokyo technology.
Japanese experts are expected to aid DLSU'seducational campaign.
PHOTO BYERIC SIYPHOTO TAKEN FROMPAMTAN.COM
 
13 October 2005213 October 20053
 
I
’ve been wanting to write aboutpoverty for a long time now, eventhough I’ve never felt qualified to doso. Yet if only for those stray cats, I will share my ponderings.They won’t make a differenceto poverty’s rude immobility, whichis like a boulder in the middle of ahighway. Pretty words and philosophy  won’t budge it a millimeter. So I’mnot going to say that this is abouthow to solve the problem. Rather,it’s a selfish confession addressed tothose who have never known what’slike to be poor, and consequently,have never known what to say or doin the face of it. I live in Pasay and usually drive to work in Manila. There’sno working day in which I don’t see, at the least: Individuals of indeterminateage walking around covered in soot and grease because they haven’t taken abath in months. Persons scrounging in the garbage for discarded half-eatenhamburgers. Topless, middle-aged women with their hair in disarray, mumblingto themselves. Or little children tapping on my car window, ropes of wiltedsampaguitas in their hands, scrambling to the sidewalk when the light turnsgreen.This last miserable tableau lingers in my mind as I shift the car into gear,thinking that I always see them in the same intersection in the same part of thecity, near the squatters’ area along the train tracks. They wear soiled garmentsand streaks of dirt on their faces and nothing on their feet. Only the weather varies: Sometimes the sun is merciless or the rain is pouring. When I was theirage, I was collecting Barbie dolls that my mother kept locked in a glass cabinetso my playmates wouldn’t touch them. Driving away from these children, whom I dare not open my window to, I feel trapped myself. Trapped in a glasshouse looking out at the ruin of the world, suffocating in ineffectual guilt.I try to do something. Sometimes I give my fries to the children wholoiter around the entrance of fast food restaurants. Occasionally I roll downthe window to place a few coins on waiting palms. Back in college I had a whole course in community service, so that every term there are entire classesof privileged Lasallians who spend their Saturdays building houses for otherpeople or visiting orphanages. Yet we ask ourselves sometimes if any of thismakes a difference.I’m reminded of the cats in our compound, who started hanging aroundbecause my aunt kept feeding them scraps. The female gave birth to differentbatches of kittens, until they grew so numerous as to become a majornuisance—pissing all over the place, making an awful racket at night, hidingunder the car so I have to shoo them away every time I have to drive off. We don’t treat them as pets, like our short fat mongrel whom we took tothe animal hospital last year for a multi-thousand peso surgery. Generally wetolerate them, giving them the leftovers that aren’t healthy for the dog. Yetit’s amazing how they survive on our inadvertent, thoughtless charity, how their very lives depend on it. How they thrive and multiply on the excessesof people’s comfort, encroaching into the forbidden circle and becoming aproblem in their numbers, until finally there’s talk of putting them all in asack to heave into the river. What is it like to be an uninvited stray? In the end, it’s something I hopeI would never have to find out, that my children and my children’s children would never have to find out. In a perfect world, no one—human or beast— would ever have to sink into this kind of wretchedness.But even knowing what the world is, one takes in the strays, and hopesfor the best.
-Noelle Leslie Dela Cruz, Editor in Chief (SY 1999-2000)
* * *Have you ever encountered non-Catholic missionaries who traveleverywhere to profess their faith? There are pastors who share their “Born Again” experiences; Mormons who eloquently speak in native tongue; and HareKrishnas who promote the modern day version of Hinduism with their monk-like attire outfits. These types of believers are also considered as “uninvitedstrays” for they are seldom welcomed by our Catholic dominated society.Even in our own University, the non-Catholic students are often seensharing their faith, as well as exhibiting their modes of worship. A primary barrier is the image of DLSU as a Roman Catholic institution, and that otherreligions are perceived as a great threat to the credibility of the the Catholicfaith. When other religions are recognized, more and more students would opentheir minds to the dynamism of faith. Good news. The acknowledgementof religious freedom opens a more vibrant and lively participation of non-Catholics in the campus. Actually, religious freedom is accepted in the campus.However, non-Catholics are limited to incorporate their ideas and activities,simply because they find it difficult to get an accreditation. What then is the fear of Catholic zealots and most religion professors inthe University? Accreditation of religious organizations will not underminethe Catholic faith. In fact, it will complement other organizations. Definitely,Christian orgs such as Victory for Christian Fellowship and Campus Crusadefor Christ will no longer work underground and can freely conduct Biblestudies and room-to-room evangelism.However, strings must not be attached on the explicit recognitionof religious freedom. The string that I am referring to is no other thanproselytizing, an act of converting someone through offering specialinducements. But like any mall discounts, religions indeed offer gifts such assalvation, prosperity, and anything beyond physical benefits. As I mentionedin my previous column, proselytizing is a vague idea that could still underminereligious freedom.Of course, we will definitely prohibit riot to happen just because of controversial topics on religion. The freedom must not end up like the religiousshowbiz debacle between
 Ang Dating Daan
and
Iglesia ni Kristo 
. Honestly,the bad side of religious freedom is the personal attack of self-proclaimedprophets against their counterparts.In a perfect world, no variety of religion exists because everyone focusestheir attention to God, who is encouraging us to have an intimate relationship with Him. But this utopian society only happens during the second life. InChristian context, accepting Christ Jesus as our personal Lord and Savior isthe only way to God’s Kingdom. After all, Christ was an uninvited stray onearth, who invited people and promised an eternal life for them.
-Paul Darwynn Garilao 
Paul Darwynn GarilaoDonelle GanLuis Emmanuel De Vera 
Royce Robert Zuñiga
Juan Carlos ChavezEarlene Clarissa ChingJan Michael JaudianEric SiyAlejandro Almendras IVKristel Kaye Chua
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13 OCTOBER 2005
The LaSallian
 
has its editorial office at 502 Bro. Gabriel Connon Hall, De La SalleUniversity, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004. TLS can be contacted through telephonenumber 5244611 loc. 701, or through its e-mail address, the_lasallian@yahoo.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity or space. None of the contentsof this publication may be reprinted without the express written permission of theEditorial Board.
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Fritzie Ian Paz-De Vera
LaSallian
The
The bastion of issue-oriented critical thinking.
 
In a perfect world, noone—human or beast—would ever have tosink into this kind ofwretchedness.There is still anavailable recourse - toinitiate change on apersonal level.
Playing God and playing godsAvenue for change and moreExercise your creative rightsVirtual Martial Law
EDITORIAL
Rules are rules,but they’re there tochallenge us to dothings a little betterevery time.So God, this is what itfeels like?
45 and fighting. 45 years of relentlesscampus journalism.
R
ally, demonstration, protest (or whatever it is called) is nothingnew to me. The daily walk on my  way to school, which is located nearMendiola Bridge, serves as a testamentto the notion that rallies are part of my everyday existence.On a Monday, members of theopposition would assert their unifiedstand against the administration. Ona Tuesday, student activists wouldstorm Malacañan in order to air theirgrievances regarding the proposedbudget cut in the education sector.On a Wednesday, drivers of PUVs would create a noise barrage due tothe incessant price increase of gasolineand crude oil. On a Thursday, groupsrepresenting the minorities maketheir claim about the government’sindifference towards their plight. On aFriday, the OFWs would stage a ‘candleprotest’ to lament the unfair treatmentgiven to Filipinos outside the country.On a Saturday, labor unions wouldband together to demand a P3000across the board wage increase. It’sonly during Sundays that the famousbridge is given its supposed rest.The plethora of available reasonsto protest paints an honest pictureregarding the current state of thePhilippines. On the one hand, it showshow democracy works—providingpeople with an avenue for redressof their grievances. On the otherhand, it questions the relevance of democracy.There is truth to the truism thatdemocracy works only for people whoare ready to accept the responsibilitiesattached to a democratic country. Thefreedom of speech and expression,though given much importance in theConstitution, is not an absolute right.Contrary to what people assert, thegovernment has the right to prohibitthe continuous or excessive display of such right. The inevitable questionarises: What then is guaranteed in theConstitution, if the government cansuppress or prevent such rights?Generally, such right, when utteredor discussed within the confines of one’shome or in any other private place, isbeyond the ambit of governmentintervention. However, when a groupattempts to convene in a public placeand exercises the freedom of speech orthat of expression, prior governmentpermit is necessary. The succeedingquestion focuses on the reason behindthe need for a prior permit. Under thePublic Assembly Act, a city or townmayor can approve or reject a petitionto hold a rally three days before it isscheduled. But every rejection must beaccompanied by a written explanation, which may be appealed to the courts.The prohibition to stage a protestcan be traced on the State’s policepower. The apparent reason for thepermit highlights the very nature of apublic place. A public place is generally open to everyone. People who desireto use the area for a specific purpose ata given time would necessarily excludeothers from enjoying it. Therefore, theState, through the city or town mayor,has the right to enjoin or limit the useof such space, if it deems that thereis another area available or that thepurpose would not prove beneficial. Which bring us to the moreimportant factor: is protest the only available recourse? Some would arguethat it is. The failed impeachmentcomplaint, for one, illustrates thecurrent political tension. Courtproceedings, on the other hand, seemto take an eternity, as seen on the on-going impeachment trial. Even thesupposed truth commission is only asgood as the resolution creating it.But the rubber that we ought tostretch has its limits. To constantly use mass demonstration in orderto initiate change is just a knee-jerk solution to a complicated problem. What happens is a perpetual abuse of such right, without considering theconsequences. And the sad part is,abusing such right is destroying that which we hold dear.There is still an available recourse—to initiate change on a personallevel. Rather than complaining aboutthe inefficiency of the government,start to create ripples of change.These might be small and seemingly insignificant attempts, but if everybody else would do his part, these ripplescould generate a wave that could alterthe entire system.It only takes a positive dispositionand the willingness to change.
-Michael Macabata, University Editor (SY 2002-2003)
* * *To the people who have joinedrallies, I wish to understand one thing:the first thought that majority of thesepeople think of when they get home,after a long and tiring day rallying onthe streets. Although I had been toquite a few of these, my experience isnot enough to teach me the answer.Let me put it in another settingI call setting X: During a spiritually engaging evangelistic meeting, thepastor has “rekindled” in you thepassion for God, and you stand upand proclaim, “Hallelujah! Praise theLord!” Spirited, you get home and: A) your naughty sibling plays a nasty trick on you; B) your mother scolds you forbeing late; C) your friends invite youto watch an “exotic” movie; D) yourfather orders you to pray to Buddha. What comes into your mind? Whether or not the willingnessand initiative to change on a personallevel exists in a person is reflected inthis seeming triviality. Much more -this triviality is a moment of truth.In the first half of the story forboth settings, the person is in a group,and with others the little energiesof individual people snowball intoone behemoth of an emotion. Thepeople initiate, or at least attemptto initiate, changes as a group. Thecollective drive the group generates isoften enough to overshadow personaldoubts and weaknesses.But when one leaves the group,everything magically changes. Theterms people within the group haveused so naturally and matter-of-factly suddenly become taboo. I point thereader to case D of setting X, as thisis the most evident scenario. Imaginesaying “Holy Spirit” in front of yourfather. Try saying “I can’t pray toBuddha,” and you’d expect a lengthy sermon/debate. When one is alone, the real worldpresents constraints that groups arenot limited by. People are normally discouraged and revert to their oldselves.The same happens with peopleinvolved in rallies. If people maintainthe same level of passion they had inrallies when they get home, then realchange may not be farfetched.So a rally may not be that bad.
- Donelle Gan
Uninvited strays
T
hink out of the box. Sounds like agood advice for the artist and the writer, who need to constantly comeup with fresh ideas in order to createsomething that can catch people’sattention.Maybe not so good for the officeemployee, who has to succumb torules, adhere to standard procedures,and comply with the boss’s demands,or else lose the job.This is one of the reasons why Imiss being a student. When you’rea student, you’re encouraged tothink out of the box, and when theideas you come up with don’t work, you can simply try again. It’s quitedifferent when you’re out there tryingto make a living. Although you’re stillencouraged to think differently and you still can try again when your ideasdon’t work, there are more importantthings you need to consider, likekeeping your job because you can’tafford not to have one. Heck, you can’tafford anything unless you have one.Thus you can’t venture too far outsidethe box. And as my best friend mademe realize, finding that job that you want to be doing for the rest of yourlife by trial and error is such a risk,unless your parents are still quite ableto back you up financially, and they (and you, sans the pride) don’t mind if they still do so years after they’re donefinancing your education.Often we hear about people inthe creative line of work complainingabout their jobs, mostly becausecreative people in general don’tlike putting good ideas to waste.Unfortunately, they can forget aboutdoing exactly what they want, and justdo the job according to the rules andspecifications provided by the clients,or whoever it is that puts money intheir pockets. And those who have nochoice but to follow mind-numbingroutines just have to carry on as if they have nothing more exciting that they’drather do.However, are rules not the exactreason why it’s so important to think,talk about and come up with freshideas? Rules are rules, but they’re thereto challenge us to do things a littlebetter every time.They’re there to remind us tothink outside the box, so we can keepourselves inspired, at least, and see our work through a fresh pair of eyes. This way, we can be able to survive a full day of work, while keeping an eye out for what it is that drives us to excel.
-Emmeline Iris Ong, Menagerie Editor (SY 2002-2003)
* * * When Pinoy Big Brother wasissued a one-night suspension last Sept.25, I wasn’t surprised. A bit jaded,maybe, but not surprised.I mean, when you have twohousemates sharing an intimateonscreen kiss in an earlier episode,uber-concerned folks will start cackling,cocky censors will be forced to takeaction, and disillusioned producers willbe forced to comply. This opens yetanother chapter in the ongoing saga of “Culture versus Censorship”.Now, I am not really a Pinoy BigBrother fan. The hype is simply toomuch for me to ingest. We have a 24-hour cable channeldevoted entirely to it, incessant updatesthat gush in almost by the hour, fourrecent evictees with beckoning showbizcareers, and a theme song that’s fastapproaching novelty oblivion. Gofigure.But, in all honesty, I think Pinoy Big Brother is still groundbreaking for what it’s worth despite its excessivepublicity. In one way or another, it hasredefined the Filipino’s connotationsof reality shows from scantily-cladstarlets performing circus acts to abunch of nameless faces portrayingreality-based scenarios, while havingto deal with their inner demons andthe Hawthorne effect. The formula worked, all right. And, granted thatthese scenarios are “real”, they can’tbe all that bad. Right?Such is the premise of shows likeBig Brother. When you incarcerate 12people who barely know each otherin one house for 100 days, surely youdon’t expect them to make like Batibotcharacters and start singing to us theFilipino alphabet. Naturally, there willbe quarrels, backstabbing, and mostdefinitely, attraction.But, there are also positiverelationships formed. However, thereare still viewers who are still scandalizedby onscreen kisses, profanity, andsexual innuendoes, as if they’re notpart of actual life.Besides, isn’t that what the“Parental Guidance” disclaimer is for?It means the program contains scenesinappropriate and too complicatedfor children and it’s the parents’ jobto do the supervising. It’s that plainand simple. And one more thing: Isn’t it funny how the MTRCB seemed so outraged with Chx and Sam’s swimming poolkissing scene, and not with Jomari Yllana’s character in KamapanerangKuba throwing his own daughter off a bell tower? Well, that’s censorship for you.
-Juan Carlos Chavez 
R
eality shows and SIM andMMORPG games are everywherethese days. Their immense popularity is attributed to how they “mirror”real life more accurately than othertelevision productions. Like life, every once in a while an event happensthat rocks our boats. In the case of television, it’s some mini game initiatedby the host that throws the entire castof reality TV stars into chaos, much tothe delight of the audience.The outcome of these events andhow these characters will appeal to theaudience will determine their lifespanin that world.The audience is an observer at first,checking out which of the charactersthey can identify with: as an equal.Then it changes into what we can relateto as our relationship with our Creator,or at least that’s what we were taughtto believe.Like the Apocalypse, judgment ispassed upon the poor denizens of thatlittle world through their observer’stext votes. An unpopular character is usually ejected, fired or voted off, either by their fellow contestants/competitorsor by the audience.Then here come the simulationgames, where one can either create a world, town or theme park, watch itgrow and its virtual inhabitants interact with it. If you’re bored since you dohave the power to do anything, you canalso destroy things at your will. Should your creations disappoint or much lessbore you, you can either throw in aflurry of disasters to entertain yourbored self. Throw in a hurricane oran earthquake and see how the peoplecope up with it. It is entertainment atthe core with a sadistic overtone. Makethis person fight with so and so, kill thiscreature, or even just build an army to wipe out another one. All this canhappen with just a few clicks of yourlittle finger. Now that’s power. So God,this is what it feels like?Reality TV and these SIM &MMORPG games are so popular now because they are very entertaining. They are entertaining as well as empoweringfor the audience. We can watch situations that caneither be pleasant or horrible, all in thecomfort of our own homes or wherever you do these things. The success of these genres is simply proof of thehuman being’s subconscious desiresto at least play as the omnipotentbeing they temselves fear (or create,depending on how you look at it).-
Ramon Del Prado, Art and Graphics Editor (SY 2002-2003)
* * *“I came, I saw, I conquered,” JuliusCaesar resounded these words duringhis campaign against Pharnaces. Yes, I would have enjoyed saying that, too. And what luxury it would have been, if I was able to sit down and have coffee with him.But I’m still being left to think if he really did play god. Now, I’ll try toexamine several individuals whom Ibelieve played or plays god.Let me cite some names and tell meif they ring a bell. Neil Gaiman, MarioPuzo, John Grisham, Pablo Neruda,Paolo Coelho, Steven Spielberg,Francis Ford Coppola, Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, Kurt Cobain, Tupac Shakur,John Lennon, Eric Clapton, MichaelSchumacher, Michael Jordan, PeteSampras, Andre Agassi, and RogerFederer. Now, tell me what they allhave in common. Yes, they came,they saw, and they conquered. They dominated the paperbacks, the silverscreens, the melodies, the circuits, thehardcourt, and the surfaces. And we allknow that the list is just a diminutiveportion of a bigger list of gods.I believe that one who seeksexcellence in accordance to hisdevelopment, as well as the welfare of others is, in his own right, a god. AndBenedict Spinoza said that “desireis the every essence of man.” We alldesire to be better and that is a givenfact. And gods defy the limits to excelfurthermore.Now, do you think Adolf Hitlerbelongs to the list? Why not? Hemade Europe and as well as the restof the world do nothing, but standin horror as his Nazi army trampledover Europe.He amassed incredible power overthe decades he had reigned. And hemade us realize the way to attain totalconquest.Then goes the question: was hea god or did he play god? I strongly disagree. He was definitely not a god;not from my understanding of whata god is. We must understand that it's eithergods or beasts. The distinction is very clear. Corrupt, vile, and unreasonablemen think they are playing gods. They think stepping over the rights of theothers and a mockery of the law istheir manifestation of there image asa god.They are just an abomination of thesociety. And I need not name names for you already know who they are. Thereis a big difference between playing godand playing beast.Nowadays, who do you think isplaying god or playing beast?
-Jan Jaudian
They do not call it Martial Law. But the Palace is already implementing measures that resemble the operations of MartialLaw, a nightmare that intends not to fight national terrorism butto hide layers and layers of lies within the government.In the past weeks, numerous indications of Martial Law havebeen taking place. First in the list is Executive Order EO 464, anact that sets several rules such as determining the circumstancesthat will allow government officials to testify before the Senateand the House of Representatives. With the recent EO 464 now at the fray, it seems like theshowground for the fiery battle of the executive and legislativedepartments has been built. Why would the President create apolicy that would hinder its co-equal branch—the legislature—from properly performing its functions? The order is indeed anact of destabilization and not in aid of legislation.In fact, the order has sampled both Marine Brig. Gen. FranciscoGudani and Lt. Col. Alexander, since they testified before theSenate Committee and refused to obey a direct order from theircommander in chief. Even demonstrators have been restrictedto march the streets, because of the government’s shift from“maximum tolerance” to “preemptive calibrated response”, whichbans protesters to conduct unauthorized rallies. With all these basic manifestations of Martial Law already taking place, “desperate” is definitely a too soft term to describethe recent move of the embattled tenant of Malacanang. After all, the moves of GMA and her minions seem to indicatethat their ears are already callous, if not full of earwax, to hear theresounding and persistent call from the silent majority for her andher cohorts to leave Malacanang.The Palace could continue its outrageous spree of comingout with detrimental policies and calibrate the responses throughinfringing both public officials and demonstrations from airing theirgrievances.For us, students, who have just learned Martial Law fromhistorical books, the challenge is not just to question the systembut also seek ways to prevent such suppressions. Action speaks louder than words. Although the governmentclaims that declaring martial rule is just a hogwash, it is already performing virtual methods to exhibit the clutches of Martial Law.In the end, what would virtually explode are the hidden lies anddeception, which are under the government's custody.
13 October 2005413 October 20055
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