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Group d Assingment700

Group d Assingment700

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Published by neoeverest

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Published by: neoeverest on Dec 02, 2011
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12/02/2011

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1. DEFINITION OF THE TERM SUPRA LEGALPRINCIPLE S
(n) The word supra is used to represent a decision,order judgment etc referred or mentioned in thedocument previously. The Latin word 'soo - prah' meansabove. When a case or decision is initially referred itcontains full details, when its reference is again calledlater the details of the case or decision is substituted bythe word 'supra'
2. WHY IS IT UNREASONABLE FOR BUSINESS TOFOLLOW SUPRA LEGALMORAL PRINCIPLES?1. APPROACHES TO BUSINESS ETHICS
When business people speak about “businessethics” they usually mean one of three things: (1) avoidbreaking the criminal law in one’s work-related activity;(2) avoid action that may result in civil law suits againstthe company; and (3) avoid actions that are bad for thecompany image. Businesses are especially concernedwith these three things since they involve loss of moneyand company reputation. In theory, a business couldaddress these three concerns by assigning corporateattorneys and public relations experts to escortemployees on their daily activities. Anytime an employee
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might stray from the straight and narrow path of acceptable conduct, the experts would guide him back.Obviously this solution would be a financial disaster if carried out in practice since it would cost a businessmore in attorney and public relations fees than theywould save from proper employee conduct. Perhapsreluctantly, businesses turn to philosophers to instructemployees on becoming “moral.” For over 2,000 yearsphilosophers have systematically addressed the issue of right and wrong conduct. Presumably, then,philosophers can teach employees a basicunderstanding of morality will keep them out of trouble.However, it is not likely that philosophers can
teach
anyone to be ethical. The job of teaching moralityrests squarely on the shoulders of parents and one’searly social environment. By the time philosophers enter the picture, it is too late to change the moralpredispositions of an adult. Also, even if philosopherscould teach morality, their recommendations are notalways the most financially efficient. Although beingmoral may save a company from some legal and publicrelations nightmares, morality in business is also costly.A morally responsible company must pay specialattention to product safety, environmental impact,truthful advertising, scrupulous marketing, and humaneworking conditions. This may be more than a tight-budgeted business bargained for.
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We cannot easily resolve this tension betweenthe ethical interests of the money-mindedbusinessperson and the ideal-minded philosopher. Inmost issues of business ethics, ideal moral principleswill be checked by economic viability. To understandwhat is at stake, we will look at three different ways of deriving standards of business ethics. 
Deriving Business Ethics from the Profit Motive.
 Some businesspeople argue that there is a symbioticrelation between ethics and business in which ethicsnaturally emerges from a profit-oriented business. Thereare both weak and strong versions of this approach. Theweak version is often expressed in the dictum that
good ethics results in good business
, which simply means thatmoral businesses practices are profitable. For example,it is profitable to make safe products since this willreduce product liability lawsuits. Similarly, it may be inthe best financial interests of businesses to respectemployee privacy, since this will improve morale andthus improve work efficiency. Robert F. Hartley's book,
Business Ethics
, takes this approach. Using 20 casestudies as illustrations, Hartley argues that the long-termbest interests of businesses are served by seeking atrusting relation with the public (Hartley, 1993). Thisweak version, however, has problems. First, many moral
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