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(Un)Satisfactory? Enhancing Life Chances by Improving ‘Satisfactory’ Schools

(Un)Satisfactory? Enhancing Life Chances by Improving ‘Satisfactory’ Schools

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Published by The RSA
Our study of schools graded ‘satisfactory’ drew on Ofsted data and inspection reports to analyse the location, demographics, and characteristics of these schools, and the relationship between socio-economic background and attendance of a ‘Satisfactory’ school
Our study of schools graded ‘satisfactory’ drew on Ofsted data and inspection reports to analyse the location, demographics, and characteristics of these schools, and the relationship between socio-economic background and attendance of a ‘Satisfactory’ school

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: The RSA on Dec 02, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/13/2014

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(UN)SATISFACTORY?
ENHANCING LIFE CHANCES BYIMPROVING ‘SATISFACTORY’ SCHOOLS
Becky Francis, RSA Director of Education
December 2011
 
2
(UN)SATISFACTORY?
ENHANCING LIFE CHANCES BY IMPROVING ‘SATISFACTORY’ SCHOOLS
FOREWORD:
MATTHEW TAYLOR
 This timely and important report on ‘satisactory’ schools has direct relevanceor the RSAs concern with ‘The social aspiration gap’ - the growing gap betweensociety’s expectations or lie in the 21st century and the trajectory upon whichit is now set. On the one hand, in providing today’s young people with aneducation which combines academic rigour, the development o wider skills andcompetencies, and nding and developing each individual’s enthusiasms, schoolsare vital to developing the citizens modern Britain needs. On the other hand,one o the most proound examples o the social aspiration gap lies between ouryearning or a airer society and the apparent inability o policymakers to developpopular, credible ways o achieving greater social justice. Given the importanceo schooling or the lie chances o disadvantaged pupils and the concentration o such pupils in (un) ‘satisactory’ schools, a step change in the perormance o theseschools could make an important contribution to closing this aspect o the gap.This report contains many striking ndings and important recommendations. Onethat stands out as emblematic o our approach is that the ‘Satisactory’ category berenamed as ‘Perorming Inconsistently’. This is not merely a matter o presentationor semantics. It highlights the key challenge in these schools o spreading the goodpractice which they contain across the whole school. Lying behind the call both orgreater support and guidance or these schools, and a more granular approach toperormance and accountability is the view that the current status o ‘satisactory’is only acceptable i it is explicitly seen as a oundation or improvement.This report reects the hard work not just o RSA sta, but o Osted colleagues,who have supplied and modelled the data, and have maintained enthusiasticengagement as the project has developed. Working with Osted has made us awareo the rich public resource o robust data and wealth o committed expertiseunderpinning the organisation’s work. Our collaboration with Osted supports thecurrent Government’s contention that making inormation about public servicestandards available in an accessible orm can itsel be an important driver o policydevelopment, public engagement and service improvement.
Matthew Taylor
Chie Executive RSA
 
3
(UN)SATISFACTORY?
ENHANCING LIFE CHANCES BY IMPROVING ‘SATISFACTORY’ SCHOOLS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:
Becky Francis would like to thank Sally Morgan and Richard Brooks or theircommitment to the project. She is especially grateul to Adrian Gray HMI or hiswisdom and induction into the world o Osted inspection criteria, and to HelenBarugh and Weichao Wang or their modelling and provision o data. She wouldalso like to thank Ruth Lupton (LSE) and Bob Burgess (King’s College London)or their eedback.
CONTENTS:
Foreword 2Executive Summary 4Section 1.
Introduction
9Section 2.
Mapping ‘Satisactory’ Schools
12Section 3.
Why Are They ‘Satisactory’?The Practices O ‘Satisactory’ Schools
18Section 4.
Discussion
34Section 5.
Recommendations
37References
 
40Appendices
 
41

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