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The Dallas Post 12-04-2011

The Dallas Post 12-04-2011

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Published by The Times Leader
The Dallas Post - Community News for Dallasn PA. 12-04
The Dallas Post - Community News for Dallasn PA. 12-04

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Published by: The Times Leader on Dec 04, 2011
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D
ALLAS
P
OST
5 0
¢
C M Y K
Vol.122 No. 41
THE BACK MOUNTAIN'S NEWSPAPER SINCE 1889
 The
www.mydallaspost.com
An edition of The Times Leader
December4-10,2011
WILKES-BARRE, PA.
Just as the turkey is synony-mous with Thanksgiving, a full-figured blue spruce with all thetrimmings might be the numberone Christmastime mascot.OK,itmaybesecondtothejol-ly guy with the red hat.Back Mountain tree farmersadmit people are always looking for the perfect tree, but perfec-tion is in the eye of the beholder.Mary Pickarski, who ownsPickarski’s Tree Farm in Dallas Township, said different treetypes of trees suit differentneeds.“It’snicetohaveaspruceifyouhave children and don’t wantthem playing with the tree be-cause it’s picky,” she said. “…Buta Fraser fir is nice because theneedlesaresofterifyouwantthechildren to help put on the orna-ments.”Shesaidfirsaresofterbuthave weakerlimbs,andtheoppositeistrue of the spruces, which canhold those heavy ornaments justfine.But Pickarski doesn’t offerblue spruce trees anymore – inspringtime they need to besprayed with pesticide to keepdestructive weevils at bay.“Idecidednottospraybecausethere has to be bad things inspray,” she said.Pickarski said it’s also impor-tant to remember where the tree will be located once inside adwelling. That tidbit of informa-tion will help determine whatshape to look for.“Ifyou’reputtingatreeinacor-ner or by a wall, a one-sided treeis fine,” she said. “How do youtrim it? You look at it and say,‘Well it’s sticking out here andthere and there.’”Myrtle Chamberlain, owner of Lehman Nursery off Route 118,said the size of a tree can be de-ceiving upon first glance.“The biggest mistake peoplemake is getting a tree that’s toobig,” she said. “The trees looksmaller when you’re outside, but whenyougetinsidetheycantakeup the whole room.”Connie and Brad Fleeger, of Sweet Valley, have had enoughexperience with fresh cut treesthat they can eyeball what size isneeded to meet their needs.“We’relookingforatleastan8-to 9-footer, and at least 6-feetacross,” said Brad Fleeger. “Welikethemrealbig…We’vehadbig trees every year for the past 37 years.”Christmas tree upkeep is an-other important part of making spirits bright during the holidayseason. The professionals saidthere aren’t any tricks – keeping the tree watered and away fromheatsourcesaretheonlyrulesforhavingagreentreethroughJanu-ary.“I have some customers whoput them up the day after Thanksgiving and some who putthem up the day before Christ-mas,” said Chamberlain. “I thinkit’s about tradition.”Pickarski said she’s heard of dozens of different concoctionsaimed to keep a tree healthy, but vigilant watering is best.“Just make sure it always has afull container,” she said.
O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree
A quest to find perfect holiday decoration
By SARAH HITEshite@mydallaspost.com
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Trees are harvested and bundled for sale at Joe’s Christmas Tree Farmin Lake Township. Selling trees during the holiday season is afamily affair for, fromleft, Timand Joe Pearson with some good cheer fromAbby Killian, Joe’s granddaughter.
Pickarski’s Tree Farm
Old Highway Road, Dallas Town-shipChoose from Fraser, Concolor andDouglas firs. Customers cut theirown trees. $20 any size. Opendawn to dusk.
Lehman Nursery
Idetown-Huntsville Road, LehmanTownshipChoose from Canaan and Douglasfirs and Blue Spruces. Trees arefresh cut. $35. Open 9:30 a.m. to 5p.m. Monday through Saturday,and from1to 5 p.m. Sundays.
Joe’s Christmas Tree Farm
Route 29, Lake TownshipChoose from Fraser and Canaanfirs and blue and white spruces.Customers cut their own trees.$35 for large trees. Open 9 a.m. to5 p.m. Monday through Sunday.
T R E E FA R M S
See TREE, Page11
dayonNovember22duringtheJu-nior Achievement of NortheasternPennsylvania BizTown program atthe Mericle Family Center for En-terpriseEducationinPittston.About 120 Dallas Elementaryfifth-graders played grown-up for aYoungstersgotthechancetoruntheirownbusinesses,deposittheirhard-earned paychecks and evenperfect the art of check writing tobuy goods during the daylonevent. Thestudentstookpartinaseriesof courses intheirownclassroomsin preparation for the visit, whichincluded learning about financialliteracy, business management,community and economy and workplacereadinessskills. The program aims to simulateadult life for the budding businessowners. Students worked at their jobs during the day, received ataxed paycheck and shopped dur-ingbreaktime. The fifth-graders piled in to thesimulated town, complete with aradio station, newspaper, café,bank, health insurance office andcityhall, andafteraquickde-brief-ing from Program Director PaulFrancis,theywereabletoholdbusi-nessmeetingsandgettowork. Theyoungadultsevenhadtoin-terview for their positions at the various employers prior to attend-ing BizTown, and some studentslearnedthatlifedoesn’talwaysendupthewayoneplans.Eleven-year-old Caleb Sweitzer,ofDallas,familiarizedhimselfwiththecomputeratBizTown’sonlyra-dio station, WBIZ, but it wasn’t whathehadsetouttodofromthebeginning.“Ijustgotpickedforthisjob,”hesaid.“Iwantedtoworkatthebank,because I’m really good at math,butIgotpickedforradioDJ.”Fellow disk jockey David Smith wasmorethanhappytoplaymusicforthecitizensofBizTown.“I like public speaking,” said the10-year-oldfromDallas.Future politico Jakob Flores, 10,of Shavertown, earned his title asmayorofthepretendtownaposi-tionhe’salwayswanted.“I wanted to follow in the foot-steps of my brother James,” saidthe suit-clad Flores. “He was thefirstmayorofBizTown. ThoughhewasnervouspriortomakinghisinaugurationaddresstohisfellowBizTowncitizens, Floresfelt confident in his role as he satandfiledpaperworkinthecityhall.“I like to take care of the busi-nesses,” he said. “I want to makesuretheygettheirprivilegesandalltheemployeesgetpaid.”Katie Zimmerman, of Dallas,saidshecouldn’twaittostartattheminiature Blue Cross health insur-ancebusiness.“I’mahealthcaremanager,saidthe 10-year-old. “My mom was anurseandshealwayshelpedme.”Zimmerman was surprised athowmuchpaperworkwasinvolvedin the insurance aspect of healthcare, but she was pretty excited to work together with her team tobenefittherestofthetownsfolk.“WhenIgrowup,Iwanttobeadoctororthatthingwhenyougoinahouseandlookforcluestosolveamystery–adetective,”shesaid.Several parents were on hand tohelpthroughouttheday,andmanysaid it was fun to watch their chil-dren discover the nuances of adultlife.
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK PHOTOS/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Dallas Elementary School fifth-grade student Jakob Flores was selected the mayor of Biz Town.This is the second time someone in the Flores family has been involved in Biz Town politics. Jakob’solder brother took on the same role years ago when he was in fifth grade.Dallas Elementary School fifth-grade students David Smith andCaleb Sweitzer serve as on-air personalities for the day at theJunior Achievement mock business town in Pittston.
Getting up close andpersonal with business
By SARAHHITEshite@mydallaspost.com
See CLOSE, Page11
For more information about the Junior Achievement BizTown program,visit www.janepa.org.
FO R M O R E I N FO R M AT I O N
 
C M Y K
PAGE2 Sunday, December 4, 2011
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
        2        5        8        9        8        9
 
The Dallas Post
Community Newspaper Group15 NORTH MAIN STREET, WILKES-BARRE, PA18711570-675-5211news@mydallaspost.com • FAX 570-675-3650
DisplayAdvertising Deadline: Tuesdays at 12 noonContact Diane McGee at 970-7153The Dallas Post has a variety of advertising rates and programs.The Dallas Post satisfies most co-op ad programs and offers creative services at no charge. Combination rates withTheAbington Journal, Clarks Summit and the Sunday Dispatch, Pittston are available.CoverageArea: The Dallas Post covers theBack Mountain community which includes theDallas and Lake-Lehman School Districts. Wetry to get to as many events as possible, butstaff and space limitations make it impossibleto cover everything. If you have news aboutyour family, town or organization please sendit to us and we’ll try to get it in. Photographsare welcome. Send them two ways, by mail to15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711 or bye-mail to news@mydallaspost.com. E-mail isthe best and most timely method for submis-sion. E-mailed photos should be in JPEGformat with a resolution of at least 200 dpi. Thedeadline for all copy is Tuesday at noon. priorto publication. Corrections, clarifications? TheDallas Post will correct errors of fact or clarifyany misunderstandings, call 675-5211. Havea story idea? Please call, we’d like to hearabout it. Letters: The Dallas Post prints lettersof local interest. Send letters to: Editor, TheDallas Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711.All letters must be signed and include adaytime phone number for verification.You can now purchase any photothat appears in The Dallas Postfrom The Times Leader photo store.Simply log onto www.timesleader.com/photostore and click on the linkfor The Dallas Post.Orders for subscriptions received byFriday at noon will begin the follow-ing week. Please inform us of dam-age or delay, call 829-5000. TheDallas Post is published weekly byImpressions Media, $20 per yearin Luzerne & Wyoming Counties(PA), $24 in NJ, NY and all otherPAcounties, $27 all other states.Periodicals postage paid at Wilkes-Barre, PA18701-9996 POSTMAS-TER: Send address change to TheDallas Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
ADVERTISINGNEWSWANT A PHOTO?CIRCULATION
CROSSWORD CORNER
Puzzle answers, Page11
A story that appeared onpage1oftheNov.20editionof  The Dallas Post needs a cor-rection. The Back MountainChamber of Commerce willsoon hire a part-time execu-tive director. The articlestated the position would befull-time.
FOR THE RECORD …
Lake-Lehman School Board 
Old Route 115, Lehman Township The school board will holdits annual reorganizationmeeting at 7 p.m. in the ju-nior-senior high school li-brary.
TUESDAY, DEC. 6
Dallas Township
601 Tunkhannock Hwy.(Route 309), Dallas Township The board of supervisors will hold a regular meeting at7:30 p.m. in the municipalbuilding.
Ross Township
72 Broadway Rd., SweetValley The board of supervisors will hold a regular meeting at7 p.m. in the municipal build-
MONDAY, DEC. 5
Dallas School Board 
2000 Conyngham Ave., Dal-las Township The school board will holdits annual reorganizationmeeting at 7 p.m. in the ad-ministration building next to Wycallis Elementary.
Franklin Township
329 Orange Rd., Franklin Township The board of supervisors will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. in the Franklin TownshipVolunteerFireHall.
Jackson Township
2211 Huntsville Rd., Jack-son Township The board of supervisors will hold its regular meeting at 6 p.m. in the municipalbuilding.ing.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 7
Dallas TownshipZoning Hearing Board 
 There will be a final hearing at 6 p.m. in Insalaco Hall atMisericordia University forChief Gathering LLC’s appli-cation for special exceptionsto build a metering station off Hildebrandt Road.
THURSDAY, DEC. 8
Dallas Area Municipal Authority 
530 S. Memorial Hwy., Sha- vertown The municipal authority will hold a regular meeting at7:30 p.m. in the administra-tion building.
THIS WEEK’S MEETINGS
BakerperformswithMaristCollegeSingers
Jacob Baker, of Shavertown, performed in “Night on Broadway,”an annual benefit concert presented by the Marist College Singersorganization. Baker is a Marist College freshman.“NightonBroadway”isastudentconcertfeaturingmusicalselec-tions from both classic and contemporary Broadway shows. Pro-ceeds from the concert are donated to Broadway Cares/EquityFightsAIDS,acharitythatassistsperformerswhostrugglewiththedisease. Thisyear,theMaristCollegeSingersdonated$5,000,theirlargestdonation to date.
Wallaceparticipatesinfundraiser
KatrinaWallace,ofDallas,participatedintheMaristCollege“Up‘til Dawn” fundraiser for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital inMemphis, TN. Wallace is a Marist College freshman.“Up‘tilDawn”isathree-dayeventorganizedbytheCollege’sStu-dent Government Association. The mission of St. Jude Children’sResearch Hospital is to find cures for children with cancer or othercatastrophic diseases. Student participants spread awareness andraisefundsbystayingupallnighttowriteletterstofriendsandfam-ily members to ask for donations.
PEOPLE BRIEFS
 
C M Y K
Sunday, December 4, 2011 PAGE3
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
A familiar dance pattern hasneverlookedsofrisky.Instead of the usual heel-toefootsteps, Helen Gilbertson andherSiberianHusky,Indy,regular-lypracticeheel-pawmovesatthe Wilkes-Barre Dog Training ClubinHanoverTownship.Gilbertson, of Sweet Valley,kicks out her right foot as 8-year-old Indy taps it with his left paw,andthepaircontinuethepattern while walking backwards to thebeat of “Do You Believe In Mag-ic?”byTheLovinSpoonful.GilbertsonandIndyarepartof the Doghouse Dancers FreestyleClubinwhichpupsandtheirhan-dlers combine music, costumes,props and chorography to create“tail-wagging”performances. The group, based in the BackMountain, performs for nursing homes and civic club meetingsand competes in dog dancincompetitionsalloverthecountry.FoundingmemberEileenHoy-son, of Shavertown, said she’llneverforgetthefirsttimeshesawa freestyle performance at a dog show years ago, remembering asprightly group of dog show per-formerswhobroughttearstohereyes.“I was completely mesmer-ized,” she said. “You could justsee the great bond between theownersandtheirdogs.”Hoyson said most of the clubmembershaveexperienceindog training, and the dancing allowshandlers and dogs to expresstheircreativesides.“Obedienceisalotmorerigid,”said Hoyson. “There’s no roomfor creativity. Freestyle opens upthecreativepartsofyourbrain.”As Hoyson and her 6-year-oldGolden Retriever, Munch, takethefloor,adizzyingarrayoffancyfoot and paw work commenceonce the first beats of “Pencil- ThinMustache”byJimmyBuffetbeltthroughthetrainingcenter. With a few quiet commandsfrom Hoyson, who always has atempting treat in her hand,Munch is weaving in and out of Hoyson’s legs, circling his owneras she lifts her arms and walking backwards in step with Hoysonandthebeat.Munchisrelentlessinhisener-gy, swooping and stepping anddancingrightoncue.“They call it the tail-wagging sport, because those dogs whohavetailsareconstantlywagging and having a wonderful time,”saidHoyson.Betty Gower’s Beagle-Weim-ramer mix, Jingles, is new tofreestyle,andneedstobeleashedduring her performance. Despitetheextrarestraint,Jinglesseems just as excited to have that extrainteractionwithherowner.“I think she’s smarter than Iam,” laughed Gower, of FortyFort.Una Valanski, of Dallas, saidshe can’t walk a straight line, sothe freedom that freestyle offerstothoseusuallyinvolvedinstrictdogshowscanbeliberating.Shedancedto“RedneckWom-an” by Gretchen Wilson with hertwo dancing dogs - 8-year-oldSpencer, a Papillon, and 6-year-oldChadwick,aPomeranian-Chi-huahuamix. The toy dogs rolled on theirbacks between Valanski’s legs,
This dance troupe has literally gone to the dogs
BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Doghouse Dancers leader Eileen Hoyson, of Shavertown, practices her routine with her dog Munch at the Wilkes-Barre Dog TrainingClub in Hanover Township.
Tail-wagging performancescombine music, costumes,props and lots of love.
For more information about theDoghouse Dancers Freestyle Club,including information about join-ing the club or scheduling a per-formance, contact Eileen Hoysonat 696-4925. The group meetswithout their furry partners at 7p.m. on the first Tuesday of everymonth at the Kingston TownshipMunicipal Building. Anyone in-terested in the club is welcome toattend meetings.
M O R E I N FO R M AT I O N
By SARAHHITEshite@mydallaspost.com
See DOGS, Page11
 The Shavertown UnitedMethodist Church Fine ArtsConcert Series will presentCarols by Candlelight at 7p.m. today, Dec. 4 at thechurch, 163 N. Pioneer Ave.,Shavertown. The annual Christmas con-cert will be an evening of carol singing accompaniedby The Anthracite Brass,hand bells, piano and organ. The chancel choir, guestsingers and three of the oth-er choirs from the church will also sing and play spe-cial arrangements of favoriteChristmas and Advent car-ols.A reception will follow theconcert and a free will offer-ing will be received. Formore information, call 675-3616.
Members of the Praise Ringers of the Shavertown United Methodist Church are, fromleft, firstrow, Michele Butts, Courtney McCarthy, Taylor Hodle. Second row, Beckie Kimpel, Cara Farina,Bethany Dennis, Kate Jenkins, Barbara Mark. Third row, John Bunney, Thomas Ketchner, ChrisBiesecker, Cindy Biesecker, Bryan Biesecker.
SUMC bell ringers plan concert
Aholidayconcertwillbepresentedat7p.m.today,Dec.4attheNewLifeCommunityChurch,TwinStacksCenter,1100N.MemorialHwy.,Dallas.PastorGideonGaitano,tenor,willbejoinedbysingersandreadersspanningawiderangeofagestopresentsongsthatwilltouchtheheart.Call333-4567formoreinformation.Fromleft,firstrow,areAvareeGaitano,JonathanAllen,RachelMadeira, Lee Lauver, Lucille Madeira, Dennis Madeira. Second row, Diane Czajkowski, April Ros-kos. Third row, Pastor Gaitano, Mike Czajkowski and Ed Kowalski.
HOLIDAYCONCERT ATNEWLIFECOMMUNITYCHURCH
 The following memorial/hon-or books have been added to theshelves of the Back MountainMemorial Library, 96 HuntsvilleRd., Dallas, for the month of No- vember 2011:
In memory of James Durkin,
“Ultimate Food Journeys,pre-sented by Jack and Alice Sallada
In memory of Charles D. “Rus- ty” Flack,
“Sail: A PhotographicCelebration of Sail Power,” pre-sented by Alice and Jack Sallada
In memory of Robert L. Flem- ing,
“Statistical Abstract of theUnited States 2012” (reference),presented by Bladwen H. Ottoand Otto Family
In memory of Clara Miller Brown,
“Beginnings” by AnneGeddes, presentedbyherdaugh-ter, Barbara
In memory of Aileen Dymond,
“Death at Christy Burke’sbyAnneEmery,presentedbyBarba-ra J. Eyet
In memory of Elin Northrupand J. Bawden Northrup,
“Talk-ing about Detective Fiction” byP.D. James, presented by SaraLonda
In memory of Lucy Sabatura,
“Inferno:TheWorldatWar,1939-1945” by Max Hastings, present-ed by Karen Adams and Family
In memory of William Cragle,
“Black Bear Hunting” by GaryLewis, presented by David andJoan Roskos
In memory of Donald Frank King,
“Getting Smart” by TomVander Ark, presented by Mrs.Dorothy King Wadas
InmemoryofElizabethR.Mo- ran,
“Eyewitness Travel Spain,”presented by The Meadows So-cial Club
In memory of my aunt, Eliza-  beth“Betty”Moran,
“Auroras”byDan Bortolotti, presented by Ju-dy and Dave Petro
In memory of Wanda Baseski,
“Making Spirits Bright” by FernMichaels(largeprint),presentedby Linda and John The following books are
inmemory of William Poepperling 
and are presented by Pat Zikorand children: “Goodnight, Good-night, Construction SitebySherri Duskey and Tom Litchen-held, “Drawing from Memory”by Allen Say The following books are
inmemory of Mabel Meehan
andare presented by Pat Zikor andchildren: “Treasuryof GreekMy-thology” by Donna Jo Napoli, “If YouGiveaDogaDonut”byLau-raNumeroff,“ToysComeHome”by Emily Jenkins The following books are
inmemory of Robert Fleming 
andare presented by John, Beth andHenry Puchalsky: “The GildedStagebyDanielSnowman,“TheNational Audubon Society FieldGuide to African Wildlife” The following books are
inmemory of Frank E. Wadas 
andarepresentedbyMrs.DorothyK. Wadas: “Basic Fishing: A Begin-ner’s Guide” by Wade Bourne,“The Complete Fishing Manual”by Henry Gilbey The following books are
inmemory of Elizabeth R. Moran
andarepresentedbyTheRenais-sance Center Age of Innocenceand co-workers: “Country Cook-ing of Irelandby Colman An-drews, “Martha Stewart’s Ency-clopedia of Crafts,” “Decorating  with Evergreens” by Robert Waite The following books are
inmemory of Harold Fritzges 
and
Memorial books remember loved ones
See BOOKS, Page11
Church memberssell coupon books
Members of the ShavertownUnited Methodist Church areselling Save Around CouponBooks for $30. Each book hasover $3,000 worth of couponsto be used locally. To place your order, call thechurch office at 675-3616.
Mark Pall offersconcert today
Mark Pall will offer an organAdvent/Christmas concert at 3p.m. today, Dec. 4 at the Dal-las United Methodist Church,4 Parsonage St., Dallas. This will be Pall’s fifth Ad- vent/Christmas organ concert.At 14, he is the youngest mem-ber of the local chapter of theAmerican Guild of Organists.A free will offering will bereceived to benefit the Amer-ican Red Cross Flood Relief.Refreshments will be served
Chi Rho Singerswill appear at TUMC
 The Chi Rho Singers willpresent an evening of music at7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 8 atthe Trucksville United Metho-dist Church, 40 Knob Hill Rd. This choir of the Susquehan-na Conference of the UnitedMethodist Church includesapproximately 40 pastors un-der the direction of the Rever-end John Dromazos, retiredand living in Lewisburg.Various styles of music willbe presented, which may in-clude classical, traditional,contemporary, folk and folkrock selections. Several in-struments are used to accom-pany the choir. At times, theaudience is invited to join thechoir in a few selections.A free will offering will bereceived.
‘The Gift’ returnsfor 18th year
Back Mountain HarvestAssembly, Carverton Road, Trucksville presents its 18thannual presentation of the“The Gift” at 6 and 8 p.m. onFriday, Dec. 9 and Saturday,Dec. 10 and at 6 p.m. on Sun-day, Dec. 11.“The Gift” is a musical dra-ma recreating the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem whereover 100 actors and live ani-mals perform in an outdoorsetting.For more information, call696-1128.
CHURCH BRIEFS

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