Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
6Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Beef Eating in Vedas and Other Hindu Texts

Beef Eating in Vedas and Other Hindu Texts

Ratings: (0)|Views: 476|Likes:
Published by Mushafiq Sultan
Present day Hindu culture is pivoted solely on the cow. Its material and spiritual concepts are both engulfed in cow worship. Such an animal worship is known as zoolatry. The Hindutva brigade propaganda machinery uses the politics of cow to mobilize the blind Hindu masses and works them into a frenzy.
Present day Hindu culture is pivoted solely on the cow. Its material and spiritual concepts are both engulfed in cow worship. Such an animal worship is known as zoolatry. The Hindutva brigade propaganda machinery uses the politics of cow to mobilize the blind Hindu masses and works them into a frenzy.

More info:

Published by: Mushafiq Sultan on Dec 04, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/05/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Special Thanks to Brother Neer Mohammed, who has been really helpful throughoutthe writing of this article and also gave valuable points.Present day Hindu culture is pivoted solely on the cow. Its material and spiritualconcepts are both engulfed in cow worship. Such an animal worship is known aszoolatry. The Hindutva brigade propaganda machinery uses the politics of cow tomobilize the blind Hindu masses and works them into a frenzy. The taboo on cowslaughter is one of the pillars of the Hindutva ideology. According to M.S.Golwalkar,a Hindutva ideologue, cow slaughter in India began with foreign domination. "TheMuslims started it and the Britishers continued it" (M.S.Golwalkar,
Bunch of Thoughts 
, Pg 496). In the past, several futile attempts have been made byproponents of Hindutva to pass a law to ban the slaughter of cows at the nationallevel. In the NCERT school textbook for Class VI (2002) we read:
―Among the animals the cow was given the most important and sacred place.
Injuring or killing of cow was prohibited in the Vedic period. The cow was called Aghnya (is not to be killed or injured). Vedas prescribe punishment for injuring or 
killing cow by expulsion from the kingdom or by death penalty, as the case may be‖
 (
Social Sciences Textbook for Class VI 
, Pg 89.).But the theory that the in Vedic times there was no cow slaughter is historicallyinaccurate. Although cow was revered and treated as sacred, it was also offered asfood to guests and persons of high status. The fact remains that ancient Hinduscriptures clearly permit the consumption of meat, even of cows. True scholars, andnot modern frauds, know this. For example, Swami Vivekananda who is consideredas a major force in the revival of Hinduism in modern India, admitted that ancientHindus used to eat meat. He says,
 
 
"You will be astonished if I tell you that, according to the old ceremonials, he is not agood Hindu who does not eat beef. On certain occasions he must sacrifice a bull andeat it."[
The complete works of Swami Vivekananda 
, Volume 3, Pg 536]In the same volume on page 174 he says,"There was a time in this very India when, without eating beef, no Brahmin couldremain a Brahmin;"Let us now look at the evidence from Hindu texts, which proves that Hinduism notonly permits beef eating but also requires its folowers to institute certain cowsacrifices. I will simultaneously refute the common arguments of Hindus.
Yajna and animal sacrifices
 
In Hinduism, Yajna is a ritual of sacrifice derived from the practice of Vedic times. Itis performed to please the gods or to attain certain wishes. A Vedic yajna is typicallyperformed by an
adhvaryu 
priest, with a number of additional priests such as the
hotar 
,
udgatar 
playing a major role, next to their dozen helpers, by reciting or singingVedic verses. How to deal with the animal, that is to be sacrificed in the Yajna, be it agoat, a horse or a cow, is mentioned in the
Aitareya Brahman 
of the Rigveda asfollows:
 
 
"6. ...Turn the animal's feet northwards. Make its eyes go to the Sun, dismiss itsbreath to the wond, its life to the space, its hearing to the directions, its body to theearth. In this way the Hotar (priest) connets it with these world. Take of the entireskin without cutting it. Before opening the navel tear out the omentum. Stop itsbreathing within (by stopping its mouth). Thus the Hotar puts breath in the animals.Make of its breast a piece like an eagle, of its arms (two pieces like) two hatchets, of its forearms (two pieces like) two spikes, of its shoulders (two pieces like) twokashyapas (tortoises), its loins should be unbroken (entire); make of its thigs (twopieces like) two shields, of the two kneepans (two pieces like) two oleander leaves;take out its twenty-six ribs according to their order; preserve every limb of its in itsintegrity. Thus he benefits all its limbs. Dig a ditch in the earth to hide its excrements.7. Present the evil spirits with the blood."[Aitareya Brahman, Book 2, para 6 and 7]Subsequently, the same Aitareya Brahman instructing on how to distribute differentparts of the sacrificial animal says,

Activity (6)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Roughcoat liked this
ahmad liked this
Narasimha Sastry liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->