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Slavery

Slavery

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Published by cory_ruda
A paper on the ethics of the American Civil War, its thesis being: Even if the Civil War hadn't started when it did, slavery itself would have been enough of a cause to start a war within the nation.
A paper on the ethics of the American Civil War, its thesis being: Even if the Civil War hadn't started when it did, slavery itself would have been enough of a cause to start a war within the nation.

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Published by: cory_ruda on Dec 05, 2011
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Ruda 1Even if the Civil War hadn't started when it did, slavery itself would have been enough of acause to start a war within the nation.
Cory RudaIt is a long debated question as to if the civil war was necessary. Some blameJames Buchanan for his last of action, some say he could do nothing to stop the war.The cause of the war was the infringement of the Northern, abolitionist-controlledgovernment, especially considering newly elected president Abraham Lincoln. If thesouth had not seceded from the Union when it did, and if a compromise was foundbetween the regions, peace still could not be found, and there would still be war. Thistime, the north would be the aggressors, though, and the primary cause of it would bethe abolition of slavery.Slavery, as put so well by David Potter, was in the late 1800's America, “the mostserious cause of sectional conflict.” (Potter 378) It is, “the central issue,” (Potter 378) Itdrilled through the country and the minds of it's people like a California fire in thesummer. It was, without a doubt, the central issue of all problems. Used for thousandsof years by hundreds of peoples, it was the epitome of a civil rights problem, and onethat would tear the nation in half.As time passes through history, human rights eventually come to the forefrontand normally allow for great freeing advancements of the underprivileged oppressed.Normally, the movement to do so starts out small, then is brought together in a gloriousspearhead event, or person, or object. The object for abolition was a book, namely,
Uncle Tom's Cabin.
This book, written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, brought the alreadycontroversial issue of slavery into the hearts and minds of the northerners who hadn't
 
Ruda 2Even if the Civil War hadn't started when it did, slavery itself would have been enough of acause to start a war within the nation.
really known what slavery and it's conditions were. Now, in this best selling series of works, everyone in the north saw slavery as their own problem, their own burden tobear if they did nothing to change it. Here was your spearhead gathering. The southtook these novels as a great offense to their strong honor. “It remains for us to consider briefly these points upon which the authoress rests her abuse of the Southern States, inthe book as a whole... Many of the allegations of cruelty towards the slaves, broughtforward by Mrs. Stowe, are absolutely and unqualifiedly false.”(Thompson 366) WhatMrs. Stowe really managed to do here was not guilt southerners into wanting abolition,but more poignantly draw lines between two sides of a war.Not all Northerners saw Stowe's work as a good thing. In the novels, Stoweargued for Christian patience and non-action to be used by the slaves. More radicalabolitionists disliked and refuted this idea, calling for action, through any meansnecessary, including rebellion and murder. “Is there one law of submission and non-resistance for the black man, and another law of rebellion for the white man? When it iswhites who are trodden.... does Christ justify them in taking up arms to vindicate their rights?” (Garrison 365) Garrison, in his
Liberator 
newspaper, fights here to have theblack man take up arms and fight back. His writings would lead the way for multipleslave uprisings.Another man wholly disagreed with the idea of non-action for the Abolitionistcause. Eventually hanged for his actions, one John Brown would make clear his stanceof action and violence in his attacks into Kansas, and his taking of an arms depot in
 
Ruda 3Even if the Civil War hadn't started when it did, slavery itself would have been enough of acause to start a war within the nation.
Harper's Ferry, Virginia. In his Last Statement before being hanged, he would state hisviews and express his satisfaction of giving his life for abolitionism by describingAmerica as a, “slave country whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjustenactments...” (Brown 376)Anger over the issue of slavery had been brewing for years between the regions.It was the central issue, permeating every waking moment of the day with debate and illwill. The north would not tolerate slavery any longer, and the south would not allow their right to it to be taken away. The south threatened secession if that right was threatened,even to go so far as to say that if the wrong presidential candidate won, namely John C.Fremont, they would leave. No where was the war before the war of slavery moreheated than in the state of Kansas. Kansas, or “Bleeding Kansas” as it was described,was to enter the Union, but it was yet unsure of whether it would be a free or a slavestate. Either way, due to the nature of the Congressional system at the time, one side of the slave debate would gain the upper hand in all matters political depending on thechoice of the state to become free or slave. Both pro- and anti-slavery groups wouldcome to violence here to help “persuade” the state's decision one way or the other. Thisviolence is described by a pro-slavery southerner, Axalla John Hoole, in a series of letters to his family:“As it happened we had almost 400 men with 2 cannon – we marched out tomeet [ our opponent, Lane]... We came in gunshot of each other, but the regular soldiers came and interfered, but not before our party had shot a dozen guns, by which

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