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(1945) Connecticut Men of the 28th - Bloody Bucket - Division

(1945) Connecticut Men of the 28th - Bloody Bucket - Division

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Published by Inveteratus
September 1945 booklet listing the men from Connecticut who served with the 28th. "Keystone" Infantry Division (better known as the Bloody Bucket) during WW2.
September 1945 booklet listing the men from Connecticut who served with the 28th. "Keystone" Infantry Division (better known as the Bloody Bucket) during WW2.

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Published by: Inveteratus on Dec 05, 2011
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CONNECTICUT
MEN
28th
- Bloody Bucket
 -
 Division
September
1945
 
28th
DIVISION
COMES HOME
The main
body
of the 28th (Keystone)
Division
sailed from Le Havre for the
U.S.
on
July
31st,
with
other units follow
ing
shortly thereafter,
some
22 monthsafter the Division had embarked for
overseas
in October of 1943.The Army Transport, James Parkerand the
U.S.S.
General Brooke, two ofive ships carrying men of the 28th In
fantry
Division docked on August 2ndat Commonwealth
Pier,
Boston. The
Parker
carried men of the 107th, 109th,and 229th
Artillery
Battalions; 103rdEngineers,728th Ordnance, Hdq. and
Hdq.
Co.
Btry.,
CIC Detachment, 192nd
P.I.
Team, and Hdq. and Special Troops.The Brooke brought in men of the 110thInfantry Regiment and 28th Signal
Battalion.
The General
Bliss
arrived in BostonAugust 3rd carrying the men of the 112thInfantryRegiment. The S.S. Excelsiordocked in Boston on August 5th
with
menof the 108th
Field Artillery
Battalion and28th Q.M. Co., as well as the 28th Cav.Recon. Troop Mech. The
troop
transportMormacport anchored off Piermont
with
the men of the 109th Infantry Regimentaboard, on August 7th.The units which arrived at Commonwealth
Pier,
Boston staged through Camp
Myles
Standish, near Taunton, Mass.,while
those
aboard the Mormacport were
taken
off by small craft and trucked toCamp Shanks, N. Y. For the first time in
more
than five years, the Division was
split
up at Standish and Shanks into groupsfor the twenty-two reception centersthroughout the country. Connecticut men
with
the New England group arrived about24 hours after debarkation at Fort Devens,
Mass.,
and they were for the most part onthe last lap of the homeward journey
within
another 24 hours.Connecticut men of the Division are toreport at Devens after their furloughs onvarious dates from September 4th to 9th.The original redeployment program calledfor the reassembly of the Division atCamp St.
Luis
O'Bispo,
California.
It is
expected
that the post-war policywhich calls for the screening-out of the
Division
of all men,
over
37 years of age,and all
those
who have
more
than 75points
will
be applied to the 28th at reception stations on conclusion of the furlough periods.
SERVICEMEN'S
COMMEMORATIVE BOOKLET 
Vol.
1 September 4, 1945 No. 12
C AR L E T O N
B. CLYMA,
Editor 
This
booklet on the return of the Key
stone
Division from the European warwas prepared by the Office of the Governor,as an addition to the souvenirs and memor
abilia
of 
those
men who participated in the
defeat
of the
once
great German Wehrmacht.The courtesies and assistance of public
relations
officers, at the ports and at the
Fort
Devens' Reception Station greatly
facilitated
the gathering of the material for
this
booklet.
Some
of the group picturesare from Signal Corps photographs. The
factual
materials herein were prepared bythe Office of Technical Information,
American
Ground Forces.
A
limited number o
copies
are availablefor distribution, to Connecticut men of the
Divisions.
They can be secured by writtenrequest to the Office of the Governor,State
Capitol,
Hartford.Reproduction of original material ispermissible only
with
written authorization.
2
 
28th
DIVISION
STORIES
EDITOR'S
NOTE:
Memories
of the
European experience
will
blur
with
the
passing
of 
years. Accuracy
will
diminish.
Details
will
become
vague
and
half forgotten.
To
record,
in
black 
and
white here
and now, the
mood,
the
impressions,
the
exciting events
of the
worst daysand
the
best
is the
purpose
of 
these stories. Connecticut
men of the
28th were asked
for
theirown impressions and experiences and
in
their
own
words they
are
here
so
recorded:
 An derson ,
George J.,
Pfc, Hq.
Btry.,
229th F.A.,
Milford
"As
far as
Europe
goes,
leaving
it was
the
best
part."
 Aurilio,
Samuel, Pfc., Co. G., 110th Inf.,Bridgeport"The Breakthrough
was
tough.
Two
B.A.R,
men in
my
platoon
got it
there.
We
came
out of a
little
town
and
starteddigging foxholes.
We
heard them coming.
Then
we saw
them coming, tanks
and
in
fantry.
The
whole town
was
afire.
The
place
was
covered
with
smoke. Fifteen
o
us
met a
bunch
o
tankers withdrawing
and
they
put us on the
tanks. All
but one
of 
us
made it, and
we
headed
for
Bastogne.Boy!
I was
praying'
 Bank s,
Albert L., Cpl., 28th Div. Band,West Hartford"No matter what
I saw
over there,
it is
much better here
at
home. They
can
keepthe whole place
as far as I am
concerned'
 Biath row,
Elry
James,
Pfc, Co. A.,
112th
Inf.,
Hartford
"Our
machine
gun
section,
set up in the
most forward positions,
was
knocked
out
by mortar fire when
Von
Rundstedt brokethrough
in
December.
Six of the
elevenmen
in our
section were wounded
and
both guns were buried.
Two of the
boys
in
my
gun
position were badly shaken
and
it
was no use to try to
hold there withoutweapons.
The
Germans were
50
yardsahead
of us in a
ravine,
but did not
come
up,
apparently
not
knowing that
our
gunswere
gone.
We
sent
a man to
report
the
situation
to the
Company CP,
400
yardsto
the
rear,
and
after
a
time another.
The
first boy made
it
okay,
and the
second,under direct observation
took cover
be-
hind
a
barn.
I
headed back,
with
the
mor
tar
fire increasing
in
accuracy
and
frequency,
and
took cover
behind that barn.
Right
then
a
direct hit blew
the
barn wideopen
and the
cattle
and
hogs
stampededout past
us cut and
bleeding.
I
told
the
other lad
to
take
it on the
run
and I
took 
off about
30
yards behind him.
The
Ger
man
fire,
now
adjusted, landed
it
right
on
us,
and
three different shells landed
so
close
that their explosion increased
my
speed.
By
good
fortune
in
less than
a
half hour after
our
guns were knocked
out I
reached
the CP
unscratched,
and
reportedthe situation.
It was
decided
we
wouldmake
a try to go
back 
and
pick 
up our
guns,
in
hopes
o
making
one
good
one out
of 
the
two.
Two of the
boys
were wounded
3

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