Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
7Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
City Limits Magazine, December 1994 Issue

City Limits Magazine, December 1994 Issue

Ratings: (0)|Views: 78|Likes:
Cover Story: Down on the Street, Geoffrey Canada and scores of Harlem residents look to rebuild the community for the future by Andrew White.

Other stories include Steven Wishnia and Andrea Payne on the devastation left by Giuliani's October Plan; Ed Tagliaferri on the benefits and drawbacks of Westchester's workfare program Giuliani looked to replicate; Laura Washington on the lack of community jobs brought to Fort Greene, Brooklyn despite Metrotech promises; Jill Kirschenbaum on East Brooklyn tenants fighting to stay in their homes; Harold DeRienzo on the ineffectiveness of the ongoing community housing movement; Mary Ellen Hombs' book review of "The Homeless," by Christopher Jencks.
Cover Story: Down on the Street, Geoffrey Canada and scores of Harlem residents look to rebuild the community for the future by Andrew White.

Other stories include Steven Wishnia and Andrea Payne on the devastation left by Giuliani's October Plan; Ed Tagliaferri on the benefits and drawbacks of Westchester's workfare program Giuliani looked to replicate; Laura Washington on the lack of community jobs brought to Fort Greene, Brooklyn despite Metrotech promises; Jill Kirschenbaum on East Brooklyn tenants fighting to stay in their homes; Harold DeRienzo on the ineffectiveness of the ongoing community housing movement; Mary Ellen Hombs' book review of "The Homeless," by Christopher Jencks.

More info:

Published by: City Limits (New York) on Dec 05, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/22/2012

pdf

text

original

 
December1994NewYork'sUrbanAffairsNewsMagazine
.ReturntoMetroTechHaveNonprofitsSoldOut?
I
 
Ci~V
Limirs
Volume
XIX
Number
10
City Limits
is
published ten
times
per
year,
monthly
except bi-monthly issues in
June/
July
and
August/September, by
the
City LimitsCommunity InformationService,Inc., a nonprofit organization devotedto disseminating
information concerningneighborhood
revitalization.Editor:
Andrew
White
Senior
Editor:Jill KirschenbaumAssociate Editor:Kim NauerContributing Editors:Peter Marcuse,JamesBradleyIntern:Amber MalikLayoutIProduction:Laura GilbertAdvertising Representative:Faith WigginsOffice Assistant:Seymour GreenProofreader: SandySocolarPhotographers:Steven Fish, EveMorgenstern, Gregory
P.
MangoSponsors:AssociationforNeighborhood
and
HousingDevelopment,Inc.Pratt Institute Center for Communityand Environmental DevelopmentUrbanHomesteadingAssistanceBoard
Board
of
Directors':
EddieBautista,New York Lawyers for the Public InterestBeverlyCheuvront,City HarvestErrolLouis,Central Brooklyn PartnershipMaryMartinez,Montefiore Hospital Rebecca Reich, Low Income Housing
Fund
Andrew
Reicher,UHABTomRobbins,Journalist Jay Small,ANHDWalter Stafford,NewYorkUniversity DougThretsky,form
er
CityLimitsEditorPeteWilliams,National Urban League
• Affiliationsforidentification only.
Subscription ratesare: for
individuals
and
community groups,
$20/0ne
Year, $30/TwoYears;for
businesses,foundations,
banks
,government agencies
and
libraries,
$35/0ne
Year,$50/TwoYears.Lowincome,unemployed,
$10/0ne
Year.
CityLimits
welcomescomments
and
articlecontributions.Please includeastamped, selfaddressed envelopefor
return
manuscripts.Material
in
CityLimits
does
not
necessarilyreflect the opinion
of the
sponsoring organizations.
Send
correspondenceto:
City Limits
,
40
Prince St., NewYork,
NY
10012. Postmaster:Sendaddress changesto City Limits,40Prince St.,
NYC
10012.Second class postage
paid
NewYork,
NY
10001
CityLimits
(ISSN0199-0330)(212) 925-9620FAX (212) 966-3407Copyright
©
1994.All Rights Reserved. Noportionorportions
of
thisjournal
may
be
reprinted withoutthe expresspermission
of
the publishers.
City
Limits
is indexed in the Alternative PressIndex
and
theAveryIndex to ArchitecturalPeriodicals
and
is
available
on
microfilmfromUniversityMicrofilms International,
Ann
Arbor,
MI
46106.
2/DECEMBER
1994/CITY
LIMITS
Crain's Delirium
A
mongthe many Single Room Occupancy hotels
on
the Upper WestSide are a pair called the Marion
andthe
Clinton Arms. Not entirely pleasant places to live, they are
owned
by private landlords
and
operated as businesses designed to make a profit.So
it
came as a surprise to some
when
the two
were
referred to as nonprofit social service facilities
in
a recent article
in
Crain's
New
YorkBusiness.
Of course, the authors
hid
their agenda
by not
actually namingthe hotels; they simply wrote,"Threeclients of facilities
on the
UpperWest Side stabbed a
man
trying to stop
them
from robbing a car," using the
incident
as one more example of
non
profits
running
amok
in
civilizedneighborhoods.These"clients"were tenants
of the
two hotels.The
Crain's
articlewas part of a series blasting
the
nonprofit socialservice sector
with
a shotgun spray
ofinnuendoand
red-baiting concoct
ed
by executive editor Steven Malanga
and
reporter Robin Kamen. Theirdisregard for accuracy reflects exactly the sort of dishonesty that drives thecurrent reactionary attack
on
nonprofits.For nearly
20
years,
City Limits
has exposed corruption in the nonprofit sector, particularly
in
the politically connected social service empires of
people
like former City
Council Member Ramon
Velez
and
stateAssemblyman Angelo Del Toro. But
with
a masterful trick
of
innuendo,Malanga
and
Kamen
used
the example
set by
these poverty
pimps
to bolster their
own
attack
on
quality organizations
with
excellent track recordswhose only
sin
has been to provide homes for poor
and
disabled NewYorkers.The irony is that corrupt social service empires
lorded
by politicians areinvariably based
in
lowincomeneighborhoods of color where the averagecitizen's political influence is limited. Yet
Crain's
primary
targets
Volunteers of America, the Cooper Square Committee, the Institute forCommunity Living, Community Access
and
West Side Federation forSenior
Housing-operate in
neighborhoods
with
a growing percentage ofwell-off residents. Guess where the influence lies.For a closer look at the misrepresentations of this NIMBY blitz, seeRobert Kolker's article
in
last month's
City Limits.
If
you haven't
got a copy,
call-we'd
be
happy
to
send
you one.But more importantly, for those of
our
readers
who
are leaders
in
thebusiness community or work
with
top executives, please consider theimplications
of
all of this. Now is the time to speak out. Write a letter
to
Crain's,
or encourage your boss to write one.
If
you have
been
reading
CityLimits,
you know the scope of poverty
in
this
town. Malanga
and
Kamen'smisguided offensive strengthens an increasingly vicious assault
on
theleast powerful people of
our
city. You might ask them,
and
the NIMBYactivists
who
helped craft their articles, what, exactly, they
would
prefer.Reopening
inhumane
mental institutions? New orphanages?
And
perhaps
we shouldn't
bother to provide housing
and
services for people
with
AIDS.Instead, we
should send them
to die
on
the
steps
of
the New York StockExchange.
*
**
A clarification: our November
1994
article
on
Family Court,"GuiltyUntil Proven Innocent,"
didnot
properly identify BethOrnstein.
She
is atraining specialist at the New York State Child Welfare Training Instituteat the Center for Development
of Human
Services at Buffalo State College.
Cover
design
by
Lynn
Baldinger.
Photos
by
Gregory
P.
Mango.
 
FEATURE
Down
on
the
Street
16
An
intensive grassroots effort
is
underway
toreclaimone
city
blockin
Central
Harlem.
Now
the
city wants
to
tryout
its
latest housing
initiative
there.
Strange
bedfellows,
or
a
marriage made in
heaven?
by
Andrew
White
BUDGET
REPORT
Blitzkrieg
6
Mayor
Giuliani's
October
Plan
will
gut
city
programs
already reel
ing
fromthe
last
round
of
budget
cuts.
by
Steven
Wishnia
andAndreaPayne
WESTCHESTER
REPORT
Mixed
Reviews
8
Everyone's
talking
about
Westchester's workfare
program.
Is
it
real-
ly
as
good
as theysay
it
is?
by
Ed
Tagliaferri
PIPELINE
HistoryRepeats
12
Residents
of
Fort
Greene
want to knowwhat
happenedto
all
of
those
jobs
they
were promised,
back
when
MetroTech
was
just
a
develop-
er's
fantasy.
by
Laura
Washington
In
Nehemiah's
Way
22
There's
a
struggle
of
biblical
proportions
going
on in
East
New
Yorkbetween
a
powerful
church group and
a
tiny
tenants'
association.Guesswho's
winning?
by
Jill
Kirschenbaum
COMMENTARY
Cityview
Managing
the
Crisis
Review
No
Solution
at
All
DEPARTMENTS
EditorialBriefs
Branching
Out
Loan
Fund
Milestone
255
Letters
25
by
Harold
DeRienzo
27
by
Mary EUen
Hombs
28
Professional
Directory
29,30
Job
Ads
30,31
6
12
16
CITY
LlMITSIDECEMBER
1994/3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->