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Introduction of W.H. Auden's Oxford Book of Light Verse

Introduction of W.H. Auden's Oxford Book of Light Verse

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Published by Yusong Huang

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Published by: Yusong Huang on Dec 06, 2011
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W. H. AUDEN'SOXFORD BOOK OFLIGHT VERSEOxford New York Toronto MelbourneOXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS
I*
5
 
Oxford
University Press, Walton Street,
Oxford
0x2 6DPOXFORD LONDON GLASGOWNEW YORK TORONTO MELBOURNE WELLINGTONNAIROBI DAR
ES
SALAAM CAPE TOWN KUALA LUMPURSINGAPORE JAKARTA HONG KONG TOKYO DELHIBOMBAY CALCUTTA MADRAS KARACHI
TO
PROFESSOR E. R. DODDSISBN o
19 881331
7
First published 1938
First
issued
as anOxford
University Press paperback ig?3Reprinted
in
hardback and paperback igyg
All rights
reserved.
No part of
this publication
may be
reproduced,stored
in a
retrieval system,
or
transmitted,
in
any
form or by any
means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,
without
the prior permission
of
Oxford University Press
This
book
is
sold subject to the condition
that it shall
not,
by
way
of
trade
or
otherwise,
be
lent, re-sold, hired out,
or
otherwise circulated
without
the publisher's prior consent
in any form of
binding or coverother than that in which
it is published
and without a
similar condition
including
this
condition being imposed
on the
subsequent purchaser
FYACE
Reproduced, printed
and
bound
in
Great
Britain byCox &
Wyman
Ltd, Reading
"?Rins
 
INTRODUCTION
B
EHIND the work of any creative artist
I there
are three principal
wishes:
the wishto make
something;
the wish to perceive something, either in the external world of senseor the internal world of feeling; and the wish
to
communicate these perceptions to others.Those who have no interest in or talent formaking something, i.e. no skill in a particularartis'tic
medium,
do not become
artists;
theydine out, they gossip at street' corners, theyhold forth in cafes. Those
who
have no interest in communication do not become artistseither; they become mystics or madmen.There is no biological or mathematical lawwhich would lead us to suppose that the quantity of innate artistic talent varies very greatlyfrom generation to generation. The majorgenius may be a rare phenomenon, but noart is the
creation
solely of geniuses, risingin sudden isolation like craters from a levelplain; least of all literature, whose mediumis
language—the
medium of ordinary socialintercourse.If, then, we are to understand the changesthat do in fact take place, why in the historyof poetry there should be periods of great

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