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Determinant of Planned Change Versus Uplanned Change

Determinant of Planned Change Versus Uplanned Change

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Published by Tonmoy Borah

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Categories:Types, Business/Law
Published by: Tonmoy Borah on Dec 06, 2011
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12/06/2011

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1ASSIGNEMENT: HRD STRATEGIES AND SYSTEM
QUESTION NO:2
“DETERMINANT OF PLANNED CHANGE VERSUS UPLANNED CHANGE”=>Organizational change is the alteration or adjustment of a company's current businessoperations. Business owners and managers may need to direct unplanned or plannedchange.Planned change occurs when leaders in the organization recognize the need for a major change and proactively organize a plan to accomplish the change. Planned change occurswith successful implementation of a Strategic Plan, plan for reorganization, or other implementation of a change of this magnitude. Unplanned change usually occurs because of a major, sudden surprise to the organization,which causes its members to respond in a highly reactive and disorganized fashion. Unplannedchange might occur when the Chief Executive Officer suddenly leaves the organization,significant public relations problems occur, poor product performance quickly results in loss of customers, or other disruptive situations arise.Note that planned change, even though based on a proactive and well-done plan, often doesnot occur in a highly organized fashion. Instead, planned change tends to occur in more of achaotic and disruptive fashion than expected by participants.
SUBMITTED TO:
Dr. Bipasha Chetiya Barua
BY:
TONMOY BORAH
(ROLLNO:21,MBA(PT) 3
RD
YEAR
 
2ASSIGNEMENT: HRD STRATEGIES AND SYSTEM
Change can be emergent rather than planned in two ways:
Managers make a number of decisions apparently unrelated to the change thatemerges. The change is therefore not planned. However, these decisions may be based onunspoken, and sometimes unconscious, assumptions about the organisation, its environmentand the future and are, therefore, not as unrelated as they first seem. Such implicitassumptions dictate the direction of the seemingly disparate and unrelated decisions, therebyshaping the change process by 'drift' rather than by design.
External factors (such as the economy, competitors' behaviour, and political climate) or internal features (such as the relative power of different interest groups, distribution of knowledge, and uncertainty) influence the change in directions outside the control of managers. Even the most carefully planned and executed change programme will have someemergent impacts.
Planned Change
SUBMITTED TO:
Dr. Bipasha Chetiya Barua
BY:
TONMOY BORAH
(ROLLNO:21,MBA(PT) 3
RD
YEAR
 
3ASSIGNEMENT: HRD STRATEGIES AND SYSTEM
Planned organizational change is normally targeted at improving effectiveness at one or more of four different levels :
human resources, functional resources, technological capabilities, and organizational capabilities.
Human Resources :
Human resources are an organization’s most important asset. Ultimately,an organization’s distinctive competencies lie in the skills and abilities of its employees.Because these skills and abilities give an organization a competitive advantage, organizationsmust continually monitor their structures to find the most effective way of motivating andorganizing human resources to acquire and use their skills. Typical kinds of change effortsdirected at human resources include : (i) new investment in training and development activitiesso that employees acquire new skills and abilities; (ii) socializing employees into theorganizational culture so that they learn the new routines on which organizational performancedepends; (iii) changing organizational norms and values to motivate a multi-cultural and diversework force; (iv) ongoing examination of the way in which promotion and reward systems operatein a diverse work force; and (v) changing the composition of the top-management team toimprove organizational learning and decision making.
Functional Resources : 
Each organizational function needs to develop procedures that allow it to manage the particular environment it faces. As the environment changes, organizations often transfer resources to thefunctions where the most value can be created. Critical functions grow in importance, whilethose whose usefulness is declining shrink. An organization can improvethe value that its functions create by changing its structure, culture, and technology. The changefrom a functional to a product team structure, for example, may speed the new productdevelopment process. Alterations in functional structure can help provide a setting in whichpeople are motivated to perform. The change from traditional mass production to amanufacturing operation based on self-managed work teams often allows companies toincrease product quality and productivity if employees can share in the gains from thenew work system.
Technological Capabilities
:
Technological capabilities give an organization an enormous capacity to change itself in order toexploit market opportunities. The ability to develop a constant stream of new products or tomodify existing products so that they continue to attract customers is one of an organization’score competencies. Similarly, the ability to improve the way goods and services are produced inorder to increase their quality and reliability is a crucial organizational capability. At theorganizational level, an organization has to provide the context that allows it to translate itstechnological competencies into value for its stakeholders. This task often involves the redesignof organizational activities. IBM, for example, has recently moved to change its organizationalstructure to better capitalize on its strengths in providing IT consulting. Previously, it was unableto translate its technical capabilities into commercial opportunities because its structure was notfocused on consulting, but on making and selling computer hardware and software rather thanproviding advice.
Organizational Capabilities:
Through the design of organizational structure and culture an organization can harness itshuman and functional resources to take advantage of technological opportunities.Organizational change often involves changing the relationship between people and functions to
SUBMITTED TO:
Dr. Bipasha Chetiya Barua
BY:
TONMOY BORAH
(ROLLNO:21,MBA(PT) 3
RD
YEAR

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