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THE CONFESSION by Charles Todd

THE CONFESSION by Charles Todd

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3.94

(86)
|Views: 97 |Likes:
Published by WilliamMorrowBooks
The Confession is historical crime fiction at its finest, continuing Charles Todd’s New York Times bestselling mystery series featuring severely damaged British World War I veteran, and yet still astonishingly efficient Scotland Yard inspector, Ian Rutledge. Todd’s troubled investigator wrestles with a startling and dangerous case that reaches far into the past when a false confession from a man who is not who he claims to be leads to a brutal murder. The Confession is a must-read for every fan of Elizabeth George, Martha Grimes, P.D. James, Ruth Rendell, and Jacqueline Winspear, as post-war London’s best detective finds himself ensnared in a dark and deadly investigation that unearths shocking small town secrets dating back more than a century.
The Confession is historical crime fiction at its finest, continuing Charles Todd’s New York Times bestselling mystery series featuring severely damaged British World War I veteran, and yet still astonishingly efficient Scotland Yard inspector, Ian Rutledge. Todd’s troubled investigator wrestles with a startling and dangerous case that reaches far into the past when a false confession from a man who is not who he claims to be leads to a brutal murder. The Confession is a must-read for every fan of Elizabeth George, Martha Grimes, P.D. James, Ruth Rendell, and Jacqueline Winspear, as post-war London’s best detective finds himself ensnared in a dark and deadly investigation that unearths shocking small town secrets dating back more than a century.

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Publish date: Jan 3, 2012
Added to Scribd: Dec 06, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/25/2014

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1
The Essex Marshes, Summer 1915
T
he body rolled in the current gently, as i still alive. It was ace-down, only the back and hips visible. It had been foating thatway or some time. The men in the ancient ski had watched it ora quarter o an hour, as i hal expecting it to rise up and walk awaybeore their eyes.“He’s dead, right enough,” one said. “One o ours, do you think?“This ar up the Hawking? It’s a German spy,” the second mansaid, nodding, as i that explained everything. “Bound to be. I say,leave him to the sh.“We won’t know who he is until we pull him out, will we?” thethird said and leaned out to touch the corpse with the boat hook.“Here!” the rst man cried out, as i this were sacrilege.The body bobbed a little under the weight o the hook.
 
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charles todd
He
doesn’t care,” the third man said. “Why should you?”“Still and all—”Turning the hook a little, he put the end under the dead man’scollar and pulled. Under the impetus o the hook, the corpse came outo the reeds obediently, as i called, and foated toward the ski untilthe shoulder o his dark, water-sodden uniorm bumped lightly intothe hull.“A bloody ocer.”“He’s been shot,” the third man said as the body shited. “Look atthat.”“Turn him over,” the second man ordered, ater peering at the backo the man’s head.With some diculty, that was done, and all three stared into thedead ace, faccid rom hours in the water.“None o our shermen,” the second man went on. “Don’t knowhim atall. You?The rst man shook his head. “I dunno. There’s something amil-iar about him. I just can’t put a name to him.”“Let’s have a look,” the third man said, and reached out to clutchthe ront o the sodden uniorm, pulling him close enough to thrusthis ngers into the man’s breast pocket. He came away with a walletstued with pound notes. He whistled in surprise.The second man was already stretching out a hand or the trouserpocket nearest him, swearing as the ski dipped alarmingly, and hehad to kneel in the bottom o the boat. As the ski steadied, he man-aged to dig into the wet cloth and extract more pound notes. “I’ll bedamned!”Opening the wallet, the third man searched or identication. “Ah.”He pulled out a card rom behind the wet notes. Squinting a little, heread, “ ‘Justin Fowler. London.’ What’s he doing here, dead, then?“I told you. A German spy.”“You’ve got spies on the brain,” the third man snapped. “Getover it.”

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mrslee_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
World War I has been over for five years, but the ghosts are still present for many, including Inspector Ian Rutledge of Scotland Yard. An enigmatic young man who is dying, comes to him to confess to a murder. Only problem is, he isn't, he didn't and soon he will not be available for questions. The more Inspector Rutledge digs into this case, the more it becomes a festering nest of evil.This was my first Charles Todd book. I found it to be an excellent puzzle. The characters are very interesting, as is the back story of Ian Rutledge. I ache for him. I was a bit skeptical of the maverick way he approached this case, with no backup, and exposing certain characters to danger without even giving them a warning, but chalked it up to an undeveloped police procedure at that time. Not knowing anything about the history of police procedure in Scotland Yard, this satisfied me. Very much looking forward to reading more of Todd's mysteries.
pennykaplan reviewed this
Rated 4/5
An insular Essex village hold the secrets to multiple murders and a false confession and Ian figures itnout with Hamish more in the background in this episode in the series. Is Ian on the road to recovery?
cfk_3 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This was excellent! I am rarely blind-sided by the revelation of the killer, but this one was completely unexpected. And using the 'confession' of a dying man using a false name as the book's starting point was truly interesting.The voice in the back of his mind, adds an unusual dimension to the inspector.
herbcat_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
The diligent detective from Scotland Yard can't think what is going on when a man tries to give himself up after confession to a murder of which he can proviide no motive or details, a few days before he dies. Other elusive characters appear as the Inspector deals with a really cold and rude to outsiders fishing village. The war plays a great part in the story as it has touched the lives of all the characters. There is a wonderful British setting and feel to the book although the writers are American. The ending is really surprising, with almost no clue leading the reader to it (I prefer having the tools to solve the puzzle myself, racing the detective.), but it is believable.
grumpydan reviewed this
Rated 4/5
In the years following WWI, a dying man walks into Inspective Ian Rutledge’s office and confesses to a murder. When Rutledge investigates to the story, and when he wants to question the man further, he is found dead with a bullet in his head. Soon he founds the man not who he claims to be and a town whose residents are all but helpful. Being the first Rutledge mystery that I have read, I found the story to be intriguing and the characters colorful. With the various twists and subplots, Todd has created a satisfying mystery. I liked it.
delphimo_1 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Ian Rutledge fights his demons, but in this novel Hamish MacLeod is fairly silent. A man enters Scotland Yard and confesses a murder to Ian. The man is murdered before Ian can question the man. Ian must go to Essex to discover the answers to this killing. Of course, the answers are not easily found, and more killings are uncovered. The story presents the village life in the 1910's and 1920's in England. The townspeople do not want change or intruders. Todd shows the class distinctions and the rigidness of village life. An interesting tale is about the smuggling of goods from France by the English fisherman. The endeavor is not primarily for personal profit, but to thwart England's taxation.
readafew reviewed this
Rated 4/5
The Confession is the 14th book in the Ian Rutledge mystery series written by the mother and son team. This is the second Inspector Rutledge book I’ve read and while I did enjoy the first book, I found this one so much better. I think it was because the first one had much more political maneuvering in it. This one was all about the mystery.A man walks into Scotland Yard and confesses to a 5 year old murder that no one knows about to Inspector Rutledge. The man is dying from inoperable cancer and only has a few weeks left to live. Rutledge wasn’t sure he totally believed the man, but the story intrigued him, so while not opening an official investigation he started doing a little snooping around. He went and visited a sleepy and rather unfriendly village where the crime supposedly took place. Shortly after the confession and Ian’s trip to the village, the man who confessed was found floating in the river with a bullet hole in the back of his head. Not only that, that man was not the person he claimed to be to the Inspector. No one was sure who he was, but Rutledge suspected it might have something to do with the murder he confessed to as another man. Inspector Rutledge has an interesting knot to untangle in this one. There are a lot of clues and some get in the way of the actual investigation he is trying to conduct. As I said earlier, I really enjoyed reading this book. It had a real mystery almost like an Agatha Christie crossed with a Sherlock Holmes. It had the English countryside feel, though this one was the insular country folk unhappy with outsiders. The writing is good and the pace is nice but not intense. I definitely recommend this to anyone who likes British mysteries.
beamis12 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
It took me a little while to get into this book,the authors have such a great feel for the time and place of these novels, but they do require total immersion. Love reading about the effects of the Great War on these little towns, as well as the secrets that they harbor. Rutledge is such a unique character, trailing Hamish around with him, definitely another one of my favorites. I did find keeping track of the four different men in the story a bit of a trial but enjoyed reading it nonetheless.
waltnoise_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This is an intriguing mystery, set in London, 1920; the aftereffects of the Great War are still in evidence. A dying man confesses to an undetected murder before disappearing, only to be found murdered. Inspector Rutledge’s unraveling of this mystery leads to the uncovering of numerous other crimes. The situation becomes very complex, but remains believable. This is the first Inspector Rutledge mystery that I’ve read, and I enjoyed it very much. Plot, dialogue, and characters are all excellent (although I could have done without Rutledge’s Imaginary Friend, Hamish.)
dorritt_1 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
This was the first volume I've read in the Inspector Ian Rutledge series, so approached it as a "newbie". However, didn't find this to be a problem. The book is plot- rather than character-driven, so no need for a lot of exposition to familiarize oneself with on-going story elements or returning characters.The plot being this: In the years immediately following WWI, a dying man walks into Scotland Yard and confesses to a murder. The ensuing investigation involves a wealthy family that has experienced several mysterious deaths, characters variously scarred by the war, and an insular English village guarding a Terrible Secret.All of which is fine, except that if you're going to write a story that's plot- rather than character-driven, the plot had better be able to carry the weight, and I felt like this plot wasn't quite up to the task. Some of the elements were confusing, the terrible secret wasn't that terrible, the murderers' motive was (I thought) unsatisfyingly thin, and the investigation seemed to involve an unnecessary number of fruitless interviews and dead ends, each of which had the effect of further deadening what little suspense the writer managed to sustain. Which is all the more disappointing because there was promise here. Todd is a competent writer - competent enough to have created characters whose lives are all, in one way or another, immutably altered by war: villages devastated by the encroachment of modernity, families devastated by death of brothers/lovers/sons, brains scarred by the horrors of the front. If only he'd allowed these characters to drive the story instead of filling the requisite number of pages with fruitless interviews, red herrings, and endless descriptions of marshes, think this could have been a lot more suspenseful, meaningful, and memorable.

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