Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Change Leadership

Change Leadership

Ratings: (0)|Views: 25 |Likes:
Published by Michael King
This new role of authority exist on the principals ability to influence the behaviors of individuals to authorize actions of continuos school renewal from the ideas of what people believe is the purpose of educating students. The new leadership roles that must be accomplished by the school principal is to focus on the culture of the school to achieve school improvement. In this chapter the authors will explore the three essential elements of leadership and demonstrate how these elements can be adapted to influence the school improvement process.
This new role of authority exist on the principals ability to influence the behaviors of individuals to authorize actions of continuos school renewal from the ideas of what people believe is the purpose of educating students. The new leadership roles that must be accomplished by the school principal is to focus on the culture of the school to achieve school improvement. In this chapter the authors will explore the three essential elements of leadership and demonstrate how these elements can be adapted to influence the school improvement process.

More info:

Published by: Michael King on Dec 08, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/06/2012

pdf

text

original

 
2009
      C      h    a    n    g    e
     L    e    a      d    e    r    s      h     i
BY MIKE KING
Change Leadership: Working Strategically
“Leaders promote andmodel a strong normativeculture of respect, trust, andaccountability.”
1
Leadership Strategy I:Empowerment
The process of “Empowerment,” or articulating a vision for the future, is thefirst step in offsetting the lack of direction. It should be noted thatempowerment or vision statementdevelopment is not a stand-alone entitycreated by one for all others to follow.True empowerment is a sharedcommodity that belongs to allstakeholders. It is important to note herethat a vision, once shared, can lead tocommon aspiration and a sense of commonality among stakeholders. Ashared vision leads to commoncommitment.A shared vision is not an idea;rather, it is a force of impressive power.It may be inspired by an idea, but onceit goes further—if it is compelling enoughto acquire the support of more than oneperson—then it is no longer anabstraction. Few forces in human affairsare as empowering as a shared vision.At its simplest level, a shared visionis the answer to the question, “What dowe want to create?” Just as personalvisions are pictures or images peoplecarry in their heads and hearts, so tooare shared visions. Therefore, sharedvisions create a sense of community thatpermeates the school and gives purposeand meaning to diverse activities.
 
     E    m    p    o    w    e    r    m    e    n     t     V     i    s     i    o    n      C    o    m    m     i     t    m    e    n     t
Digital Sandbox
 
Change Leadership
1. Attention Through Vision
A vision is a shared goal/missionstatement.A mission statement articulates:a view of a realistic, credible,attractive futurea condition that is better thanwhat now existsa clear sense of theorganization’s purpose anddirection
When leaders beginowning these problemsand taking responsibility for student achievement,they model a different andmore productive way of approaching problems.
2
2. Assessing Position ThroughOwnership
Trust is the mechanism that makes itpossible learning schools to work.Trust implies accountability,predictability and reliability.Relentless dedication engages trust.All innovators face the challenge of overcoming resistance to change.True leaders must assess the needs of their audience.The assessing function requiressensitivity to the many needs of thestakeholders and a clear sense of theaudience’s position.The assessing function requiressensitivity to the many needs of thestakeholders and a clear sense of theaudience’s position.The leader is responsible for the setof ethics or norms that govern thebehavior of the people in the schoolsetting.
Source: Data from Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus, Leaders: Strategies for TakingCharge, p. 82, Copyright 1997, Harper Collins Publishers.
Shared vision is vital for the learning school because it provides the focus and energyfor learning.Strategy I of the leadership model therefore means that a learning school cannotexist without a shared vision. Without a focus and commitment to some vision or goalthat the stakeholders truly want to achieve, the forces supporting the status quo canoverwhelm the forces supporting meaningful change. With shared vision, thestakeholders are more likely to expose their accustomed ways of thinking and redefinethem in more cooperative and constructive terms, thereby recognizing personal andorganizational shortcomings. Thus, developing a collective vision for the future of thelearning school is the first strategy to a systematic design for successfulimplementation.
Leadership Strategy II: Assessing Positioning throughOwnership
Successful school empowerment cannot occur in a learning school without firstassessing whether the position of the vision is acceptable. This process systematicallyevaluates the quality of the vision statement in order to determine how the goals of theprogram will be developed to support issues of school reform. Assessment of one’sposition on the new vision is a process that requires collaboration and thedevelopment of trust. Trust is the lubrication that makes it possible for schools to work.Trust implies accountability, predictability, and reliability. Trust is what keeps schoolshumming—the glue that maintains educational integrity. In traditional settings of schoolreform, educational leaders do not take time to assess their position on reform issueseven when these issues are mandated through state or federal laws. The typicalresponse from educational leaders when asked why they must make these changes is,“It is out of our control” or “This is what the law requires of us.” A second type of response to the question of why we have to change is to use new mandates as anexcuse for developing policies that fit self-centered ideas on school reform. In eachcase, the educational leaders did not assess their position about why the school shouldchange. This traditional approach to positioning limits the ability of others toparticipate and sets up boundaries that restrict the development of a learning school.The restrictive leadership approach leaves the stakeholders with the feeling thatthey should stay away from making decisions on their own, and it probably alsoinhibits them from acting on their own. Using the traditional approach, assessing a
A shared vision isnot an idea; rather,it is a force of impressive power.
 
Assessing Position
Assessing one’spositioning throughownership is a process inthe leadership model thatallows for valuable inputfrom all the stakeholders.
The assessment position throughownership involves two basic acts:gathering information so thatdecisions will be informed andsupportable, and applying criteria tothe available information in order toarrive at justifiable decisions.Effective leadership takes risks; itinnovates, challenges, and changesthe school’s culture. Innovation—anynew idea—will most likely not beaccepted at first, no matter howwonderful the idea may be. If everyone embraced the innovation, itmight not be a true innovation.The assessment process should beimplemented systematically andopenly so that others can followalong and so that everyone can learnfrom the process.position would be that the leaders decide what needs to be done to improve theschool and expect the stakeholders to be loyal to their requests. Unfortunately, theresults of this position are low trust, negative feelings and comments about schoolreform, and lack of commitment to school improvement.This example reiterates two very important reasons for stressing trust throughpositioning. The first has to do with educational integrity. A learning school can becompared to healthy individuals; in fact, it is analogous to a healthy identity. A schoolpossesses a healthy structure when it has a clear sense of what it is and what it is todo. Therefore, educational integrity involves choosing a direction and staying with it.However, in order for a school to have integrity, it must have an identity, that is, asense of what it is and what it is to do. The second reason behind the significance of positioning has to do with staying the course, that is, constancy. Effective leadershiptakes risks; it innovates, challenges, and changes the school’s culture. Innovation—anynew idea—will most likely not be accepted at first, no matter how wonderful the ideamay be. If everyone embraced the innovation, it might not be a true innovation.Innovation causes resistance to stiffen, defense to set in, opposition to form. It takesrepeated attempts and endless demonstrations before innovation can be accepted andinternalized by any school.Assessing one’s positioning through ownership is a process in the leadershipmodel that allows for valuable input from all the stakeholders. Assessing thepositioning of the school’s vision can provide insightful direction toward theestablishment of future goals, can enhance the development of ownership, and cangreatly improve the overall effectiveness of the schools program. In this component of the model, practitioners will be taken through a process for developing an assessmentplan through assessment climate profiling. The assessment position through ownershipinvolves two basic acts: gathering information so that decisions will be informed andsupportable, and applying criteria to the available information in order to arrive atjustifiable decisions. The assessment process should be implemented systematically andopenly so that others can follow along and so that everyone can learn from theprocess. Information gained from the process will be transferred to the school’sstrengths and weaknesses chart for final analysis and revisions. Once this has beenaccomplished, the principal will be ready to develop strategies for designing alearning school.
Trust is thelubrication thatmakes it possible for schools to work.Trust impliesaccountability,predictability, andreliability.
Source: Data from Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus, Leaders: Strategies for TakingCharge, p. 82, Copyright 1997, Harper Collins Publishers.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->