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A History of Science

A History of Science

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Published by Gaurav Shakya

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Published by: Gaurav Shakya on Dec 08, 2011
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A HISTORY OF SCIENCE
BY HENRY SMITH WILLIAMS, M.D., LL.D.ASSISTED BY EDWARD H. WILLIAMS, M.D.
 
IN FIVE VOLUMESVOLUME I.THE BEGINNINGS OF SCIENCE
 
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A History of Science
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BOOK I.CONTENTSCHAPTER I. PREHISTORIC SCIENCECHAPTER II. EGYPTIAN SCIENCECHAPTER III. SCIENCE OF BABYLONIA AND ASSYRIA CHAPTER IV. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ALPHABETCHAPTER V. THE BEGINNINGS OF GREEK SCIENCECHAPTER VI. THE EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHERS IN ITALYCHAPTER VII. GREEK SCIENCE IN THE EARLY ATTIC PERIODCHAPTER VIII. POST-SOCRATIC SCIENCE AT ATHENSCHAPTER IX. GREEK SCIENCE OF THE ALEXANDRIAN OR HELLENISTICPERIODCHAPTER X. SCIENCE OF THE ROMAN PERIODCHAPTER XI. A RETROSPECTIVE GLANCE AT CLASSICAL SCIENCE APPENDIX
 
A History of Science
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 A HISTORY OF SCIENCEBOOK IShould the story that is about to be unfolded be found to lackinterest, the writers must stand convicted of unpardonable lackof art. Nothing but dulness in the telling could mar the story,for in itself it is the record of the growth of those ideas thathave made our race and its civilization what they are; of ideasinstinct with human interest, vital with meaning for our race;fundamental in their influence on human development; part andparcel of the mechanism of human thought on the one hand, and ofpractical civilization on the other. Such a phrase as"fundamental principles" may seem at first thought a hard saying,but the idea it implies is less repellent than the phrase itself,for the fundamental principles in question are so closely linked with the present interests of every one of us that they lie within the grasp of every average man and woman--nay, of every well-developed boy and girl. These principles are not merely thestepping-stones to culture, the prerequisites of knowledge--theyare, in themselves, an essential part of the knowledge of everycultivated person.It is our task, not merely to show what these principles are, butto point out how they have been discovered by our predecessors.We shall trace the growth of these ideas from their first vaguebeginnings. We shall see how vagueness of thought gave way toprecision; how a general truth, once grasped and formulated, wasfound to be a stepping-stone to other truths. We shall see that