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Based on the Distance of the Speed of Light

Based on the Distance of the Speed of Light

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Published by SpacedustSC
Formula I used in Avionics for frequency vs. wavelength.
Formula I used in Avionics for frequency vs. wavelength.

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Published by: SpacedustSC on Oct 25, 2008
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07/06/2013

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YORK’S RF / LIGHT FORMULA
(Based On The Distance Of The Speed Of Light)
528000 / 1863
λ 
=
or
528000 / 1863
γ 
=
 
Simplified to 283.4138486 / X
Step #1: Take the number of feet in one mile.
528000 ft. = 1 mile
 Step #2: Add two zeros on to 5280 as a scale modifier making it.
5280HOW 283.4138486 / X WAS DERIVED AT INSTEAD OF THE MEANS 98400
 Step #3: Take the distance light travels in one second.
186300 miles/sec
 Step #4: Subtract two zeros from 186300 as a scale modifier making it.
1863XX
 Step #5: Now use this formula:#1 #2 #3
FORMULA
 
528000
 
divided by
 
1863divided by (
your
frequency
in question or your full wave
length of the antenna
One will give you the other. It's as simple as that. ONE, TWO, THREE!
 
)
 Example #1: What is the length of a full wave antenna for C/B (citizens band radio) that operatesin the range of 27 MHz ?
EXAMPLES
 
528000
 
divided by
 
1863
 
divided by
 
27
Example #2: Now let’s work the same problem but this time we know the length of the antennaand are looking for what frequency range that full wave antenna will operate in at its optimumefficiency to check our first answer. We just simply substitute one in place of the other.
=
 
10.49680921 ft.
in length is the answer.
528000
 
divided by
 
1863
 
divided by
 
10.49680921=
 
27.
using ft. =
27 MHz
as our answer.
 
 HARMONICS
One of the beauties of this formula other than the same exact formula to find the wavelength isalso used to find the frequency if that is your unknown. On top of all this the formula is not onlypractical and simple but most important is based on the
“distance of the speed of light”
 . Onecan also obtain the harmonics of a known frequency just by using the harmonic conversion guideshown below.To apply this sees the example shown on the prior page using 27 MHz for the CB RadioAntenna. We used feet which will give us MHz range for our CB radio frequency. If we useinches then we are talking about the GHz frequency range or if we use miles we are looking atthe Hz frequency range. Just by changing scale we can find the harmonic of a frequency. Thedown side is some elements will have sub harmonics of a different element within that samewindow of operation range of target element under question. For now however we’ll just keep itsimple and use the harmonic conversion guide shown below. This will give us the harmonicsneeded for the frequency under question.Feet = MHz range
HARMONIC CONVERSION GUIDE
Inches = GHz rangeMiles = Hz rangeTo make the conversion we will have to take the know wavelength-
(γ)
used and convert thatwavelength-
(γ)
to a different unit of measurement. Example once again using 27 MHz for ourCB Radio frequency we get an answer in feet because “Feet” = MHz. The answer came out to be
10.49680921 ft.
in length as our answer for the wavelength-
(γ)
of our antenna. If we change thefeet units to units in inches then the answer will be the harmonic but in the GHz range scale. Feetfor the CB Radio antenna will be our base wavelength-
(γ)
for 27 MHz. All other units will showthe harmonic of that same base line wavelength-
(γ).
The symbol
(γ)
used for wavelength is called
lambda-(
γ
)
.

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