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765th Korean Commisary

765th Korean Commisary

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Published by: cunningb on Dec 14, 2011
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12/30/2013

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r
From PIO, Hqs, 3d TMRS
O
THEKOREAN, United Nations Civil
Assistance
Commission,
Korea (UNCACK),
neans
essential
items
of livelihood
will
be
n-ovided.
While UNCACK does
furnish
es-
ential
items
of
livelihood, provided
for
bynember-countries
of theUnitedNations, itJso seekstohelptheKorean help
himself.
Close observation of economic problems
n
South Korea convinced UNCACK that
aontinuous
dole
was
economically unhealthynd
would_
only add to the economic
crisis
acing
theKoreans.To
provide
amarketfor
Koreans
who
have purchasing power which
•ould
help to gradually establish a stable
market,
UNCACK set up
what
they refer to
s
Korean employee
salesstores.
These
tores
tend to force
prices
on the open
mrket
to a reasonable
level
by providing
umerous
items which employees
of the Re-
ublic
of
Korea government
and its
agencies
iay
purchase
at
reasonable
pa-ices.
One such store
is
Korean employee salesore number 8, opened on
June
13, 1952.
perated
by the 3d Transportation Military
ailway
Service for Koreans employed
by
e Korean National
Railroad
in
the
Pusan
•ea,
thestorehas
served
over
63,000
per-ns since opening, and in
excess
of 5 billion
on
have passed
across
its
busy counters.
With a
potential
of
18,000
KNR
employeesuse the store each month,
9,000
in each
ro
week
cycle,
KESS
number
8 is one • of
e largest of the
nine
stores operated by
\
T
CACK.
'
'
Col.
Robert
C,
Ross
(Fort
Smith, Ark.),
•ector
oisupply,
UNCACK, originated
and
veloped
the
stores. Supplies
for the
ires
are
secured
from
the
United States
vernment,
and the Korean and Japanese
irkets.
Most
of the
items
of
clothing
are
"plus
and
odd-sized items
of
Army issue,
nging
from
the ascot
tie to
odd-sized
nbat
boots,
and
from
military
police
hats
WAC
and
nurses uniforms,
the
store's
rcnandiss,
attractivelydisplayed,looks
ebargain
day in the
basement
of any
ge
chain
store
in the
States. Colonel
.Ross
s
that
KESS number
8, for
instance,
has
le more
business
in one day,
from
s U.S.lar
exchange
standpoint
(6,000
won per
5.
dollar),
than does
the
average
Wool-
rth
or
Nevvberry
variety store
in the
U.S.
Unbleached
material which the Koreans
for
every purpose
is
purchased
on therean
and Japanese markets.Food items
available
in the storearede-
tely
limited.
Sugar
and
salt, available
oughUNCACK
supply channels,
various
at
sauces,
pickle
sauces, pudding
mixtures,
I
other such items,
are
secured through
'••.
Army Quartermaster channels,
and are
plus
to the Army's, requirements.
CACK has
plans
for a
larger selection
food
stuffs.
i
KESS
number
3,
a
fast moving item
is
p
flakes. Lux and Ivory Soap
Flakes
are
i
lor
3,000
won per
box,
or 50.
cents. With
h
large
or
small
box of
soap
flakes, the
tomer
is
required
to
take
one bar of
ndry
soap. Japanese
laundry and
toilet
p
is
also
available.
Material
moves
idly,
and
items
of
clothing
such
as
over-
is,
jackets,
shoes,
etc.,
are
purchased
r.sley
is
secured
by the
Koreans.
Prices
ge
i'rom
2,000
won for a
necktie
to75,000
i
for a WAC overcoat.
These prices
aresptionally
reasonable
considering
the
es
of the
open
market, and the
items
arc
usually
available
on the
open market.
The
KNR
employee,
or any
member
of
family,
presents
his
identification
at
a
.11
building
outside the
main store.
He
already
looked
at the
list
of available
is.
and
the cost
thereof.
A
sales
slii_
is
cj
out st this
station,
and the
customer
s
into
the
store building, where
he
givc-s
sales
slip
to the cashier,along
with
his
i.
The
cashier
counts
the
won,
and
r.tampr.
sales
slip.
One copy is retained, and
one
V
&
relurnrdin
the
customer,
whs
£ive3
Scilt'S
slip
to a salesman,
and
receives
his
'cliandj.se.
NCACK
has
visions
of
sixty
such
stores
a'.giiout
South
Korea,
They
are
certain
hepower of
(he
stores
for
they have
ob-
•eci
prices on the
open
market marked
n
to the.iarnelevel as
prices
on
similay
is
which
the
Korean employee sales
c-s
have
for
sale.
Naturally,
when
the
an
unlimited source,
the
.market
is
forced
to
reduce prices
to
meetlegitimate
and
gov-fcrnment-supportedcompetition.Sgt. Arthur
Stirrat
(Cincinnati,
O,),
765th
Transportation Railway Shop Batta-lion, is the only soldier assigned to the
store.
The Korean manager, and other em-
ployees,
of the store, are as conscientiousabout their workas if thestorewas aprivateenterprise in which they owned a controlinginterest. Capt. Francis R.
Isenberg
(Altoona,
Pa.),
G-4
liaison
officer,
3d
TMRS, acts
in
an advisory capacity.Through such
facilities,
UNCACK pre-vents widespread
discontent"
becauseofcoldand hunger, and at the same time, makes itpossiblefor the 3dTMRS, which operatestheKorean
National
Railroad, to receive ahigher level
of
performance
and
efficiency
from
employees' whose concern about everpresent economic problems has been some-
what alleviated.
I
A
BOOMING
business
is done at store No. 8
in
Pusan. Operation of the stores tends to
lower
prices on the open Korean market.
(U.S.
Army photos
by PFC S. W.
Turner)
I
A DISPLAY OF SHOES and other items ofclothingareshownat aKorean employessales store in Pusan. It is operated by the
3d TMRS
with surplus
goods.
THE
STOKES SERVICE
Koreanpersonnel
Dnly.
Sgt.
Arthur
Stirvat
is
replenishing-
Hie
fast
moving
stock
of a 3d
TMRS
store.
SGT.
DAWSONW.
MERCHANT,
a
diver,
i
from
two
tenders
as he
climbs
back
onto
 
pleting:
a salvage job in Pusan
harbor,'

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