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City Limits Magazine, February 1976 Issue

City Limits Magazine, February 1976 Issue

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Stories include a message from the editors for the introductory issue of City Limits; a profile on the Brooklyn Comprehensive Housing Development Corporation; Michael McKee on a housing strategy for 1976; the Executive Director of the Association of Neighborhood Housing Developers Inc. on talking to the media, talking to students and going to meetings with city, state and federal government officials about housing issues; The fight against demolition within the Community Housing Movement.
Stories include a message from the editors for the introductory issue of City Limits; a profile on the Brooklyn Comprehensive Housing Development Corporation; Michael McKee on a housing strategy for 1976; the Executive Director of the Association of Neighborhood Housing Developers Inc. on talking to the media, talking to students and going to meetings with city, state and federal government officials about housing issues; The fight against demolition within the Community Housing Movement.

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Published by: City Limits (New York) on Dec 14, 2011
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·
CITY
LIMITS
co.mmunity housing
news
Association
of
Neighborhood
HOUSing
Developers
Inc.
_
29
East22nd
Street New
York,
N.Y.
10010
2126747610
Feb.,
'76
~ - - - - - - -
...
.
--
--
-
._
--
_.
PROFILE: A
COMMUNITY
GROUP:
THE
BROOKLYN
COMPREHENSIVE HOUSING
DEVELOPMENT
CORPORATION
A
MESSAGE
FROM
THE
EDITORS
Brooklyn
Comprehensive
Corpora
tion,
based
in
Fort
Greene
and
Crown
Heights,
is
struggling for
its
survival.
Brooklyn
'
Compre
hensive Corporation
is
dedicated
to
providing
decent housing,
on
a
non-profit baSis, to
low
and
mod
erate
income
families
through
the
preservation
and
rehabilitation
of
sound
older
housing
and
theconstruction of
new
housing
whose
design
and
cost
are
acceptable
to
community
residents.
Bro
o
klyn
Comprehensive
Corpora
tion
4
was
founded
in
1973
by
Frank
Garrett
and
Angela
Miller
and
gr
ew
to
include
six
other
people
wi
th
·a
variety
ofprofessional
and
para-professional
backgrounds.
In
ad
dition
the
Brooklyn
Compre
h
ensive
Co
r
poration
staff
has
be
en
supplemented
by
Neighborhood
Youth
Corp
and Urban
'
Corps
stu-
dents
recruited
from
the
local
community.
Brooklyn
Comprehen
sive's
desire
was
to deal
with
the
ho
us
ing
problems
ir
.
the
community
in
a
positive
and
00mprehensive
manneri
In
particular,
they
felt
it
essential
to
add
a human
ele-
m
ent
to
planning
for the
structur-
al
upgrading
of
housing.
This
was
an
ingredient often
missing
from
projects
in
the
past.
So
in
addi
tion
to
working
on
innovative
de
sign
Brooklyn
Comprehensive
Corp
oration
places
majoremphasis
on
tenant
organizing
and
personal
counseling.
Community
involve-
.
ment
in
all
aspects of
develop
ment
-
from
early
planning
and
design,
through
construction
and
With
this
introductory
issue
of
"City
Limits," the
Association
is
responding
to
a
need, expressed
at
our
Retreat
last
September,for
more
communication
within
and
a
mong
people
and
organizations
in
the
movement
to
save
and
improve
housing
for
lowand
moderate
in-
come
residents
of
New
York
City.
We
hope
that
our
members
and
af-
filiate
groups as
well
as
others
concerned
withour
city's
housing
problems
will
find
this
publica
tion to
be
useful.
To
insure
that
it
will
serve
the
community
housing
movement and.
to
make
future issues
better
and
more
effective,
we
urge
our
read
ers to
keep
in
touch
with us.
Please
let
us
know
what you
thinkof
this
issue;
how
should
it
beimproved;
what
do
you want
to
see
included
in
future
issues;
what
should
be
left
out?
And,
of
course,
we
would
especial
ly
welcome
your
suggestions
for
specific
.
articles,
reports
and
the
like.
If
you
have
a
story
or
an
article
youwant
to write
or
to
have
written,
please
let
us
know.
We
would
like
to
include
as
much
material
as
possible
written
or
submitted
by
others
than
our
own
staff.
 
Profile:
A Community
Group(conttd)
eventual
management
of
the
new
or
rehabilitated
housing
is
thecornerstone
of
Brooklyn
Compre-
hensive's
policy.
The
founders'
own
backgrounds
contributed
to
the
development
of
this
compre
hensive
approach
to the
housing
problem.
Frank
Garrett,
President
of
Brook
lyn
Comprehensive,
was
born
in
Harlem
in
1943,and
raised.in
the
Fort
Greene
section
of
Brooklyn.
After
·
completing
his studies at
the
High
School
of
Industrial
Arts
and
Pratt
Institute,
he
began
work
as
an
architectural
designer
for
rirms
such
as
Harrison
and
Abramo-
vitz,
Lundquist
and
Stonehill.
Eventually
his desire
to
do
some
thing
about
the
worsening
housing
situation
in
Fort
Greene
led
him
to
provide
volunteer
architectur-
al
assistance to
a
number
or localprojects
such
as
the
Charles
Drew
Neighborhood
Health
Center;
and
serving
as
chairman
to
a
number
of
community
groups
including the
For~
GreeneTradesmen
Council
and
theFort
Greene
Rehabilitation
League.Angela
Miller,
Vice-President
or
BrooklynComprehensiye,
moved
to
New
York
rrom
Indiana
eight
years
ago.
A
graduate or
Ball
State
Univers~ty,
majoring
inSocial
Work,
she
was
employed
at
the
Brooklyn
Y~W.C.A.
OL
a
special
youth
counseling
pruject
rollowed
by work
at
Park
East
High
School
as
a
family
counselor
specializing
in
child
guidance,
and
then
con
ducted
a
study
on
Post
Heroin
Alcohol
Dependency on
a
specialproject
ror
a
local
community
drug
rehabilitation
program.
Angie
also
was
increasingly
dis-
turbed
by
the appalling
housing
conditions
many
of
her
clients
were
living
in.
Both
Angie and
Frank
are enrolled
at
Cornell
University'
s
·Cooper~-
tive
Extension
Tenant
Orientation
Program
Specialist
Training
Project.
Frank,
Angie and
the
other
founding
members
of
Brooklyn
Comprehensivehave
been
disappointed
by
the
re-
cent
city
cutbacks.
They
hoped
that
the
city
administration,rec
ognizing
the
worsening
condition
or
the
housing
stock,
would
rund
infill
housing
and
rehabilitation
projects
at
an
erfective
level.
Despite
these
setbacks,
they
are
determined
to
keep
working,
seeking
alternate
services
of
rinanc
ing
and
providing
services
to
the
oommunity.
Despite
the
complete
drought
or
financing,
Brooklyn
Comprehensive
can
point
with
pride
at
their
in
volvement
with
a
number
or pro
jects
it
has
sponsored
over
the
past
three
years.In
Fort
Greene
Brooklyn
Comprehensive
Corpora
tion
has been
working
with
theTri
Block
Associationor
Ashland
Place,
St.
F~lix
Street
and
·
Fort
Greene
Place.
The
residents
of
these
three
streets
/
range
fromyoung
brownstoners
to
long-time
residents,
many
or
whom
are
elderly
and
living
on
small,
.
fixed
incomes.
One
or
these"old
timers"
is
a
gentle
lady
by
the
name
of
Peace
Love,
a
seventy~
six
yearold
"driving
rorce"
in
the
block. Recently,
because
of
her
inability
to
pay
ror
the
in
creaSing
costs
of
oil,
taxes
and
repairs,
Mrs.
Love's
house
was
foreclosed
by
the
city.
Brooklyn
Comprehensive
is
helping
Mrs.
Love
and
other
small
home
ownersand
tenants obtain
financing
ror
rehabilitation
and
cooperativeconversion,
so
that
Mrs.
Love
and
others
will
not
have
to
leave
their
homes
for the uncertainexistence
or
lire
in
a
welrare
hotel.
The
Tri
Block
Association
and
Brooklyn
Comprehensivehave work
ed
unceasingly
to
develop
a
reas
ible
plan
for
the
thre~
blocks.
Although
the
city
has
had
nothingbut
praise
for the plan,
the
com-
munity has
received
empty
prom
ises
regarding the
funding
and
implementation.
 
Profile:
A Community
Group(cont'd)
Brooklyn
Comprehensive
is
also
in-
volved
in
Crown
Heights,
a
desig
nated
Neighborhood
Preservation
Area
located
in
central
Brooklyn.
Once.
again,
very
little
has
beenaccomplished
by
the
city,
which
has
been
unable
to
pr
'
ovide
the
necessary
funding
-
even th9ugh
completed
plans
and
specifications
were
produced, thanks
to
seed
money
provided
by
the
Consumer
Farmers
Foundation, based
on
the
6i~y's
promise
to
fund.
Nonethe
less,
.
Brooklyn
Comprehensive
is
still
attempting
to
process
four
projects
comprising
54
units
of
renovated, cooperative
housing
and
46
units
of
low-income
rental
housing.
Even
though
the
pro
Jects
have
been approved
by HDA's
Preliminary
Loan Review
Committee,
the
tenants
are
now
being
told
that
there
is
no
more money
avail-
able
with
which
to
renovate
their
apartments.
Fran
'k
Garrett
told
us,
"How
can
the
city
do
this
when
families
wit~
children
are
suffering
notonly
frominhuman
conditions,
but
also
from
bitter
disappointment?
Their
hopes have
been
raised
and
now
shattered.
On
February
lOth,
I
alongwith
those
tenants
will
demand
an
explanation
from
the
Board
of
Estimate!"
THE
STATE
LEGISLATURE
A
HOUSING STRATEGY
FOR
1976
by
Michael
McKee
Tenants
and
tenant
organizations
are
traditionally
mistrustful
ofthe
legislativ~
process
and have
chosen
to
ignore
it
rather
than
run
the
risk
of
contamination
by
getting
involved
in
it.
I
believe
this
is
a
serious
mistake.
As
un
savory
as our
legislative
system
i's ,
it
is
as
important
for
people
to
deal
with
it
as
it
is
to
organ
ize
our
communities.
Organizing
and
lobbying
are
actually
part
ofthe
same
political
process.
If
you
have
a
well-organized
housing
group
in
your
community
you
have
the
best
medium
for
influencing
the
legislative
process;
why
not
use
it?
Conversely,
if
you
are
going
to
try
to
influence
a
leg
islative
body
you
cannot
neglect
organizing
because
grass
roots
pressure
is
the
only
way
to
hold
elected
officials
~ccountable.
Community
people
usually
hesitate
to
get involved
in
lobbying
be
cause they
think
you
need
spec!al
qualifications
to
do
it.
The
fact
is
that
anyonecan
lobby.
You
do
need
to
know
how
the
legislative
body you
plan
to
lobby
functions,
but
once
you've
learnedthe
ropes,
it's
largely
a
matter
of
(1)
know
ing
what
you're
talking
about
and
(2)
sticking
with
it.
If
what
you're
talking
about
is
something
you
are
dealing
with
all
the
time
in
your neighborhood
(in
our
case,
housing
and
tenant
rights)
the
first
part
comes
naturally.
Stick
ing
with
·
it
is
harder
because
the
legislative
process
is
a
slow
one
and
it's
easy
to
become
discouraged.
Two
years
ago
tenant
and
housing
activists
from
Albany,
New
York
City
and
Westchester
Counties
founded
the
New
York
State
Ten-
ants
Coalition.
The
main
activity
of
the
Coalition
has
been
to
lobby
the
New
York
State
Legislature for
laws which improve
housing
and
strengthen tenant
rights
and

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