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A Song for the Nations

A Song for the Nations

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A term paper discussing the Jerusalem Temple and its music, especially during the post-exilic period. From the evidence in the research, I assert that Gregorian Chant, as the Church's own music - the music of the New Covenant - is the theological and historical fulfillment of Temple music - the music of the Davidic Covenant. Presented to Dr. Scott Hahn at the Franciscan University of Steubenville in my Principles of Biblical Study I class.
A term paper discussing the Jerusalem Temple and its music, especially during the post-exilic period. From the evidence in the research, I assert that Gregorian Chant, as the Church's own music - the music of the New Covenant - is the theological and historical fulfillment of Temple music - the music of the Davidic Covenant. Presented to Dr. Scott Hahn at the Franciscan University of Steubenville in my Principles of Biblical Study I class.

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Published by: John Paul Dominic Brodeur on Dec 17, 2011
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04/09/2014

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 A SONG FOR THE NATIONS:THE DAVIDIC COVENANT AND THE MUSIC OF THE TEMPLEJohn Paul Dominic BrodeurTheology 211 DDr. Scott HahnFall 2011
 
 iCONTENTSI.
 
INTRODUCTION 1II.
 
TEMPLE RITUALS 21.
 
The Perpetual Sacrifice 22.
 
Singing 3III.
 
INSTRUMENTS IN THE TEMPLE ORCHESTRA 41.
 
Stringed Instruments 42.
 
Wind Instruments 53.
 
Sabbath Considerations 6IV.
 
CULTIC SINGING 61.
 
Psalmody 62.
 
The
 Hallel
103.
 
Canticles 11V.
 
THE DAVIDIC COVENANT 121.
 
Psalms and the Temple 122.
 
Theological Foundations 133.
 
International Character 14VI.
 
LATER MUSICAL DEVELOPMENT 161.
 
Second Temple 162.
 
Pagan Cults and Percussion 173.
 
Ideology and the Prominence of Vocal Music 18VII.
 
THE SYNAGOGUE SERVICE 201.
 
Orientation toward the Temple 202.
 
The Contemporary Critical View 213.
 
Origin of the Synagogue 224.
 
Singing in the Synagogue 23VIII.
 
THE CHRISTIAN LITURGY 24IX.
 
CONCLUSION 26
 
1I. INTRODUCTIONThe question of music is foundational to the perception of right worship. This inquiry isespecially urgent because of the circumstances and technological advancements of the modernage. The accessibility and seemingly inexhaustible demand for recorded music
in today‘s society
has undeniably proven its importance to humanity and its great usefulness in communicating
life‘s most inexpressible mysteries
. It comes as no surprise in a culture with such pervasivemusical influence, that music is greatly diversified amongst Christian denominations; and notonly diversified, but in many cases, characteristic of their most fundamental religious practice.This is strikingly illustrated by some denominations who have entirely replaced those last relicsof the sanctuary, the altar and the cross, with a
―worship band.‖
 Hence, the following questions naturally arise: what is the relationship between musicand worship? What are the principles which guide a proper use of music in the act of worship?Indeed, how essential
is
the involvement of music in worship? These are difficult questions forany Christian to answer without personal bias, and they require significant reflection, far beyondthe scope of this current work.Instead, this paper seeks to provide a hermeneutical key to these questions by examiningthe musical dimension of the Jerusalem Temple as outlined in the Old Testament, in rabbinicsources, and contemporary scholarship. By examining the historical practice of music in theTemple liturgy, its association with the Davidic Covenant, its relationship with the surroundingcultures, and finally its involvement in the Synagogue, the reader may be surprised to discoveran historical and theological precedent for the emergence of Gregorian chant as the suprememodel of religious music, embodying the fulfillment of musical development throughout thewhole of Scripture.

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