Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Fuzzy Nonlinear Programming for Mixed-discrete Design

Fuzzy Nonlinear Programming for Mixed-discrete Design

Ratings: (0)|Views: 10 |Likes:
Published by vaalgatamilram
Fuzzy Nonlinear Programming for Mixed-discrete Design
Fuzzy Nonlinear Programming for Mixed-discrete Design

More info:

Published by: vaalgatamilram on Dec 18, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/04/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Fuzzy Sets and Systems 146 (2004) 167–186
www.elsevier.com/locate/fss
Fuzzy nonlinear programming for mixed-discrete designoptimization through hybrid genetic algorithm
Ying Xiong
, Singiresu S. Rao
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124-0624, USA
Received 28 November 2002; received in revised form 6 August 2003; accepted 3 September 2003
Abstract
Many practical engineering optimization problems involve discrete or integer design variables, and oftenthe design decisions are to be made in a fuzzy environment in which the statements might be vague orimprecise. A mixed-discrete fuzzy nonlinear programming approach that combines the fuzzy
-formulationwith a hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed in this paper. This method can ÿnd a globally compromisesolution for a mixed-discrete fuzzy optimization problem, even when the objective function is nonconvex andnondierentiable. In the construction of the objective membership function, an error from the early researchwork is corrected and the right conclusion has been made. The illustrative examples demonstrate that morereliable and satisfactory results can be obtained through the present method.c
2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords:
Hybrid genetic algorithm; Fuzzy programming; Mixed-discrete optimization; Membership function;Engineering design
1. Introduction
The traditional approaches to nonlinear programming problems treat the design variables as con-tinuous quantities. However, in real life, many engineering optimization problems frequently involvediscrete or integer design variables. This is due to limitations such as availability of components instandard sizes and constraints imposed by the construction and manufacturing practices. Examplesof discrete/integer variables are the number of gear teeth, the value of gear module, the number of screws or rivets used in a structural assembly, the number of bars in a truss, etc. Optimization prob-lems involving both continuous and discrete/integer variables are often referred to as mixed-discretenonlinear programming problems (MDNLP).
Corresponding author.
E-mail address:
yingxiong2@yahoo.com(Y. Xiong).0165-0114/$-see front matterc
2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.doi:10.1016/j.fss.2003.09.001
 
168
Y. Xiong, S.S. Rao/Fuzzy Sets and Systems 146 (2004) 167–186 
As early as late 1960s, people were showing interest in the research of MDNLP. However, manyresearch works were not reported until the last decade. Some of the well-known approaches can be classiÿed as: (1) branch-and-bound method [13,14,28,29]; (2) sequential linearization algorithm [20,21]; (3) sequential linearization coupled with the branch-and-bound method [4]; (4) penalty func- tion approach [5,11,32]; (5) dual strategy [17]; simulated annealing [18]; and (6) genetic algorithm [8,25]. More details of the research work done in this ÿeld can be seen in the literature surveys of  Loh and Papalambros [20], and Arora and Huang [2]. Generally, the design problems are always stated in precise mathematical forms. It must be recog-nized that many practical problems encountered by designers and decision makers would take placein an environment in which the statements might be vague or imprecise. Usually it is dicult todescribe the goals and constraints of such optimization problems by crisp relations through equationsand
=
or descriptions. It may be possible that a small violation of a given constraint may lead to amore ecient and practical solution of the problem. Fuzzy set theory can build a model to repre-sent a subjective estimation of possible eect of the given values on the problem and permit theincorporation of vagueness in the conventional set theory that can be used to deal with uncertaintyquantitatively. Hence, it has proven to be an ecient tool for the treatment of fuzzy problems, andthe mathematical developments have provided the theoretical basis necessary for use in practicalapplications.Fuzzy set theory was originally established by Zadeh [38] in 1965. Since then this theory has been widely developed and applied to various scientiÿc ÿelds. The fuzzy set-based optimizationwas introduced by Bellman and Zadeh in their seminal paper on decision making in a fuzzy en-vironment [3], in which the concepts of fuzzy constraint, fuzzy objective and fuzzy decision were introduced. These concepts were subsequently profusely used and applied by many investigators.Fuzzy optimization is a exible approach that permits a more adequate solution of real problemsin the presence of vague information. In the last two decades, the principles of fuzzy optimizationwere critically studied, and the technologies and solution procedures have been investigated withinthe scope of fuzzy sets. Today, similar to the developments in crisp optimization, dierent kinds of mathematical models have been proposed and many practical applications have been implementedto solve fuzzy optimization problems in various engineering ÿelds, such as mechanical design andmanufacturing [6,7,9,16,26,35], power systems [1,12,22,40], water resources research [36,37], control systems [15,19,23,30,33,34,39], etc. However, to the author’s knowledge, only a limited work has been done in the development of optimization techniques for fuzzy nonlinear programming problems in mixed-discrete design space,and the literature discussing the application of such techniques is scarce. Therefore, seeking a reli-able and eective optimization method seems to be necessary and meaningful to researchers in theengineering design ÿelds.In this paper, a mixed-discrete fuzzy nonlinear programming (MDFNLP) approach is presented.Speciÿcally, the fuzzy
-formulation is combined with a hybrid genetic algorithm for solving fuzzyoptimization problems with mixed-discrete design variables. The genetic algorithm starts with a population of designs instead of one design point and converges to a design space in the neighbor-hood of the global optimum point. Hence, the genetic algorithm is used as the primary scheme of optimization in this work. The basic concepts of the genetic algorithm are combined with a tradi-tional gradient-based optimization strategy to develop a new mixed-discrete hybrid genetic algorithm(MNHGA), with a detailed description given in the following sections. In the construction of the
 
Y. Xiong, S.S. Rao/Fuzzy Sets and Systems 146 (2004) 167–186 
169
objective membership function, an error from the paper of Shih and Lai is corrected and right conclu-sions have been reached. Both linear and quadratic functions are used in constructing the constraintmembership functions. Although linear membership functions are commonly used, mainly for sim- plicity, a quadratic membership function can also be used when the preference values correspondingto dierent constraint limits follow a nonlinear relationship.
2. Mathematical model
The mathematical model of a general MDFNLP problem can be stated asP(MDFNLP) : ÿnd
which minimizes
f
(
 X 
)s
:
t
: g
 j
(
 X 
)
G
 j
; j
= 1
;
2
;:::;m; X 
= [
 x
1
;:::;x
nq
;:::;x
nd
;:::x
n
]
T
; x
L
i
6
 x
i
6
 x
U
i
;
i
= 1
;
2
;:::;n
where
G
 j
indicates the allowable interval of the constraint function
g
 j
. The lower and upper boundsof the design variables are indicated by
x
L
i
and
x
U
i
, respectively.The fuzzy feasible region is deÿned by considering all the constraints as
=
m
 j
=1
G
 j
(1)and the membership degree of any design vector
to the fuzzy feasible region
is given by
 s
(
 X 
) = min
 j
{
g
 j
(
 X 
)
}
;
(2)which is the minimum degree of satisfaction of the design vector
to all of the constraints. Thedesign vector
can be considered feasible if 0
¡
 s
(
 X 
)
¡
1. The objective function deÿnes a fuzzydomain
in
that is expressed as
=
{
f
(
 X 
)
}
m
 j
=1
g
 j
(
 X 
)
;
(3)where
f
(
 X 
) and
gj
(
 X 
) denote the membership functions of the objective and
j
th constraint func-tion, respectively. Thus, the optimum solution
can be selected by maximizing the smallest mem- bership function in the fuzzy domain
such that
(
 X 
) = max
(
 X 
)
;
(4)where
(
 X 
) = min
{
f
(
 X 
)
;
g
1
(
 X 
)
;:::;
gm
(
 X 
)
}
:

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->