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Peter Lance DUI-Series Part Eleven

Peter Lance DUI-Series Part Eleven

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Published by Peter Lance
Part Eleven in Peter Lance's investigative series exposing alleged corruption by the Santa Barbara PD's award-winning DUI officer Kasi Beutel
Part Eleven in Peter Lance's investigative series exposing alleged corruption by the Santa Barbara PD's award-winning DUI officer Kasi Beutel

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Published by: Peter Lance on Dec 19, 2011
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12/19/2011

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Sanchez afinalist forSan Bernardinochief of police
By PETER LANCE
SPECIAL TO THE NEWS-PRESS
The News-Press has learned SantaBarbara Police Chief Cam Sanchez isone of two finalists being consideredfor the job of police chief in San Ber-nardino, the sprawling 81-square-mile Inland Empire city with a popu-lation more than twice that of SantaBarbara.San Bernardino Police Chief KeithKilmer, who started his term June 1,2009, announced his retirement inearly March.While San Bernardino city officials,including Mayor Patrick Morris andCity Manager Charles McNeely,refused to confirm or deny that Chief Sanchez was a finalist, a member of the city’s nine-member Board of Police Commissioners as well as a CityCouncil member say Chief Sanchezmade it to the final two from a list of 30candidates that first was whittleddown to a list of five, including threelaw enforcement officials from Ari-zona and one from Ohio. According to Councilwoman WendyMcCammack, “Mayor Morris was
Chief Cam Sanchez
Please see
CHIEF
on
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Stocks resume sell-off; Dow down 519
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Specialist James Ahrens works at his post onthe floor of the New York Stock ExchangeWednesday.
By STAN CHOE
 ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Back to reality and backdown, Wall Street focused Wednesday onthe bleak landscape ahead for the economyand wiped out its big gains from a day earlier— and then some.The Dow Jones industrial average closeddown 519 points and has now lost more than2,000 in less than three weeks. Swings of several hundred points in just minutes havebecome commonplace.This time, the selling was intensified byworries about debt problems in Europe.On Tuesday, the Federal Reserve said itplanned to keep interest rates ultra-low fortwo more years. After some initial confu-sion, the stock market staged a huge come-back and had one of its best days.But the interest-rate news proved to be adistraction. The Fed made the pledgebecause it sees almost no chance that theeconomy will improve substantially by 2013,and when investors focused on that, theydumped stocks again.“Now it gets back to the fundamentals,”said Mark Lamkin, founder of LamkinWealth Management, which manages $215million.The Dow closed at 10,719.94, down 4.6percent for the day. By points, it was theninth-steepest decline for the market.Wednesday was another day marked bybig moves. The Dow was down more than 300points within minutes of the opening bell. Itrecovered some of that loss, then driftedsteadily lower in the last two hours.The market has traded that way for twoweeks, lurching up and down. The mostextreme example was Tuesday, when theDow swung more than 600 points in the onehour and 45 minutes after the Fed’sstatement.The stomach-churning highs and lows arereminiscent of the fall of 2008, the depths of 
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STOCKS
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By KATHRYN WATSON
NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER
One might guess that completestrangers from three differentcountries — Poland, the CzechRepublic and the United States —would have little in common.But as 13 high-school-agedexchange students with LibertyEducation Tours learned as theytrekked across the country by planeand bus on a two-week tour of his-toric Ronald Reagan sites, peoplehave certain commonalities that noteven geographical and linguisticbarriers can disguise for long.“For me, it seems similar,” 18-year-old Lucie Charvatova from theCzech Republic said of the assort-ment of students she had been trav-eling with from Washington, D.C., toCalifornia since Aug. 1.The tour stopped Wednesday atthe Reagan Ranch Center on StateStreet, and his home in Rancho DelCielo.The sponsored students hail fromfrom downtown Los Angeles, toNipomo, to Georgia and overseas. Allwere selected and sponsored by theReagan Legacy Foundation for thepurpose of simply giving them a fla-vor of the principles of freedom Mr.Reagan so dearly held. For many of the international students, this August visit was their first to theUnited States.“I met so many interesting peopleand I improved my English skills,”18-year-old Konrad Jaworski of Poland told the News-Press outsidethe late president’s residence atRancho Del Cielo, where studentshad a private tour of the ranch fromYoung America’s Foundation staff members and Michael Reaganhimself, son of the late president.Despite their differences, thestudents found common ground,with the Spanish-speaking Ameri-cans teaching their newfoundfriends Spanish, and the Polish stu-dents teaching their native tongue totheir American peers.The tour, a part of the MichaelReagan-founded Reagan LegacyFoundation, was open to any Euro-pean or American high school stu-dent with at least one year remainingof their secondary education, and agrade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0scale to qualify. At the ranch, Michael Reaganshared his fond memories of the688-acre property and 1,600-square-foot home, where he and his childrenwould visit for special occasions likeThanksgiving dinner.“Everything is there the way thathe left it,” Michael Reagan told thestudents of his father’s residence.Students were enthralled by sto-ries of “Rawhide,” the Secret Ser-vice code name for the powerful manwho loved to spend his free hoursriding horses on the trails he cut withhis own hands.The ranch, as Michael Reagan andYoung America’s Foundation staff members explained, was Mr.Reagan’s place to relax and rejuve-nate, away from the demands andpressures of public life.Undoubtedly, they said, Mr.Reagan was a president at all times,taking and making official calls anddevising policies on the grounds of Rancho Del Cielo, which means“Ranch in the Sky” in Spanish. Thelate president even signed hisfamous tax-cutting bill, whichslashed the top marginal tax ratefrom 70 to 28 percent, on the prop-erty almost exactly 30 years ago.But the ranch tells the story not just of an American president, but of a down-to-earth person who cutwood with a chainsaw, enjoyed
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STEVEMALONE
/NEWS-PRESS
Students and chaperones munch on sandwiches on the lawn outside the late President Ronald Reagan’s Ranch,Rancho Del Cielo, on Wednesday afternoon.
Please see
REAGAN
on
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Taking aim
FOOD / D1NATION & WORLD / B1
LEADERS WANT TO GET TOUGH WITHRIOTERS WHILE KEEPING CLOSE EYEON INTERRACIAL VIOLENCE
O
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A toast
TO SANTA RITA HILLS AND10 YEARS OF RECOGNITION AS ANATIONAL WINE REGION
$720,000possiblyembezzledfrom police
By ANGEL PACHECO
NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER
 A civilian Santa Barbara PoliceDepartment employee accused of embezzling parking citation revenuecould haveswiped asmuch as$720,000,according to asearch warrantaffidavit.The depart-ment’s busi-ness officesupervisorKaren Flores,47, has beencharged withembezzling more than $100,000 — theamount authorities say Ms. Floresadmitted to taking when she wasarrested Friday.But in an affidavit in support of asearch warrant signed a week ago bySuperior Court Judge Clifford Anderson, District Attorney Investi-gator Robert Lowry writes the city hasnoticed up to $720,000 in unaccountedfunds from parking revenue over thepast five years.“During the course of this investi-gation evidence has shown that KarenFlores has been responsible for part,if not all of the theft occurring,” wroteMr. Lowry, who has 32 years of expe-rience as a peace officer.Senior Deputy District AttorneyBrian Cota has charged Ms. Lowrywith grand theft by embezzlementwith a special allegation that the theftwas more than $100,000. She is alsocharged with four counts of thedestruction of parking citations.Mr. Cota told the News-Press that atpresent, he has filed what he believesto be the appropriate charges andcircumstances.He said he can amend the complaintagainst Ms. Flores if different oradditional charges are warranted.
Karen Flores
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MISSING
on
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By NORA K. WALLACE
NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER
The aftermath of a once-per-decade exer-cise known as redistricting manifested itself invarious ways Wednesday with Santa BarbaraCounty’s five supervisors.First District Supervisor Salud Carbajal wasmaking plans to take a group of departmentheads and county staff on a field trip in Sep-tember, to the far-flung community of Cuyama.Third District Supervisor Doreen Farrhopes to introduce herself and her staff to themembers of the Guadalupe City Council assoon as the new political boundaries takeeffect next month.Fourth District Supervisor Joni Gray,meanwhile, had tears of joy in her eyes atgetting to represent the city of Lompoc as awhole, though she is grieving at losingGuadalupe.In the 2nd District, Janet Wolf is thankful tohave kept the Mesa neighborhood in herboundary and said she plans to bring her staff to the Goleta City Council, to give its membersan update on county government.The newest member of the board, 5th Dis-trict Supervisor Steve Lavagnino, despitebeing upset at how the process evolved, calledit a “new day.”On Tuesday during its meeting in SantaMaria, the board gave its final approval to anordinance creating five supervisorial districts,each with roughly 84,500 constituents.In a process that was acrimonious at times,the board in a 3-2 vote settled on county mapdrawn by Mr. Carbajal that shifted Cuyamafrom the 5th to the 1st; Guadalupe from the 4thto the 3rd; the Santa Barbara Airport from the3rd to the 2nd; and kept the 5th with its mainbulk in the densely populated neighborhoodsof central and north Santa Maria.In the most politically charged decision, theboard majority left Isla Vista and UCSB in the3rd District — as it has been for more than 100years — igniting the fury of a group of SantaYnez residents who said the more liberalstudent population to the south was swayingelections and board decisions.Ms. Wolf sought to reassure people at theend of the meeting Tuesday.“I think you will be well served by any of us,”she said. “We are all hard workers and want todo what’s best for this community.”The most visible change geographically is inthe 3rd District, which now runs from Goleta toGuadalupe, along the coastline.“I’m really excited about it,” Ms. Farr said of her new lines. “I’m really looking forward toserving the new areas that I have.”In addition to Guadalupe, she also nowrepresents the unincorporated communitiesof Mesa Oaks and Mission Hills in the Lompoc Valley, and the Tanglewood area near SantaMaria.Ms. Farr said she takes her staff on an annualretreat where they drive through the entiredistrict, so she plans to now make sure they visita Guadalupe City Council meeting and thetown’s senior citizen program.Though Guadalupe Mayor Lupe Alvarez wasangry about the shift to a new district, Ms. Farrsaid she has an “excellent working
County supervisors prepare to represent new districts
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