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The Visible Energy Trial: Insights from Qualitative Interviews

The Visible Energy Trial: Insights from Qualitative Interviews

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In December 2009, the UK Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) announced its intention to roll‐out ‘smart meters’, accompanied by free standing real‐time displays, to all UK householders by 2020. As well as paving the way to a ‘smarter’ grid able to handle large amounts of micro‐generation and improved demand management, this decision is justified by the assertion that: “These meters will provide consumers with real time information on their electricity use to help them control consumption, save money and reduce emissions”. Previous studies on the provision of feedback to energy consumers support this assertion, suggesting it can help to realise savings of between 5 and 15% annually, depending on the quality and type of feedback provided. Several large scale trials into the effectiveness of various interventions into domestic energy use are ongoing, such as the Energy Demand Research Project in the UK however, as yet very little is known about the processes through which these kinds of savings are achieved. Katzev and Johnson’s (1987) observation that “our understanding of how feedback does or does not work remains unexplored or untested” still largely applies.
In December 2009, the UK Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) announced its intention to roll‐out ‘smart meters’, accompanied by free standing real‐time displays, to all UK householders by 2020. As well as paving the way to a ‘smarter’ grid able to handle large amounts of micro‐generation and improved demand management, this decision is justified by the assertion that: “These meters will provide consumers with real time information on their electricity use to help them control consumption, save money and reduce emissions”. Previous studies on the provision of feedback to energy consumers support this assertion, suggesting it can help to realise savings of between 5 and 15% annually, depending on the quality and type of feedback provided. Several large scale trials into the effectiveness of various interventions into domestic energy use are ongoing, such as the Energy Demand Research Project in the UK however, as yet very little is known about the processes through which these kinds of savings are achieved. Katzev and Johnson’s (1987) observation that “our understanding of how feedback does or does not work remains unexplored or untested” still largely applies.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research on Dec 19, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/13/2014

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The Visible Energy Trial:Insights from Qualitative Interviews 
Tom HargreavesFebruary 2010 
Tyndall Centre for Climate Change ResearchWorking Paper 141
 
 
The Visible Energy Trial: Insights from Qualitative Interviews
 
Tom Hargreaves
 
Tyndall Working Paper 14
1
,
February
2009
Please note that Tyndall working papers are "work in progress". Whilst they arecommented on by Tyndall researchers, they have not been subject to a full peer review.The accuracy of this work and the conclusions reached are the responsibility of theauthor(s) alone and not the Tyndall Centre.
 
TheVisibleEnergyTrial:InsightsfromQualitativeInterviews
TomHargreavesFebruary2010Correspondence:Dr.TomHargreavesSchoolofEnvironmentalSciencesUniversityofEastAngliaNorwich,NR47TJTom.Hargreaves@uea.ac.uk

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