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Conflict and Cooperation in Selling

Conflict and Cooperation in Selling

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Published by Frank Rumbauskas
Sales superstars gain the agreement - and the business - of prospects by guiding the sales process in a spirit of cooperation, while sales failures bring conflict to the appointment. Learn the difference and how you can succeed with cooperation!
Sales superstars gain the agreement - and the business - of prospects by guiding the sales process in a spirit of cooperation, while sales failures bring conflict to the appointment. Learn the difference and how you can succeed with cooperation!

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Published by: Frank Rumbauskas on Oct 31, 2008
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06/16/2009

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Conflict vs. Cooperation in Selling
There are two main types of communication that take place inselling situations: conflict and cooperation. Which type of com-munication you’re using will have a profound impact on whetheror not you get the sale.Conflict takes place as the result of the vast majority of salesprocesses and especially as the result of those taught in tradi-tional sales training, which usually goes as follows: The sales-person initiates the sales process through a cold call. Becausethe prospect does not expect or anticipate the call, sales resis-tance automatically exists and the salesperson is forced to over-come it. This is conflict. When the first appointment takes place,the prospect again has his defenses up in anticipation of a pushysales pitch. As a result, frivolous objections are thrown out thatthe salesperson must overcome. More conflict. At the end of theappointment, the salesperson must secure a time for a secondappointment in order to present a proposal. The prospect saysto call next week for a time, but the salesperson wants to se-cure it now. Even more conflict. The second appointment takesplace, the proposal is presented, the salesperson asks for theorder, and now the prospect really has objections. Conflict. Thesalesperson works to overcome them and then uses a sleazytechnique such as the infamous alternate close to again ask forthe order. Conflict at its worst.Now let’s take a look at a sale where the state of mind is notconflict but cooperation:The prospect learns of the salesperson’s offering through thesalesperson’s thoughtful, organized self-marketing plan. Theprospect contacts the salesperson and asks for a meeting, towhich the salesperson of course agrees. Cooperation. During thefirst appointment, the prospect willingly explains the need thatexists and the salesperson listens and takes down all pertinentinformation. They mutually agree to a time to review a solution.Cooperation. The day for the proposal appointment arrives andthe prospect is excited to finally learn of a way to solve his prob-lem. The salesperson presents it and the prospect agrees that itlooks great. More cooperation. There is no need for the sales-person to engage in any ethically questionable closing tactics
Frank J. Rumbauskas Jr.www.NeverColdCall.com
Frank J. Rumbauskas, Jr.FJR ADVISORS, LLC21163 Newport Coast DriveSuite 445Newport Beach, California 92657www.NeverColdCall.com

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